Can welding Oxygen be used in place of medical oxygen?

Page 3 of 9  

On Sun, 20 Jun 2010 11:47:13 -0400, "Ed Pawlowski"

I imagine they evacuate any tank they are going to put oxygen in, just for the reasons you mention. It wouldn't take much of any fuel gas in there to make an oxygen explode like a bomb. Have you ever seen a balloon full of oxygen and acetylene go up? One the size of a bowling ball will rattle windows blocks away and that is just a balloon. Imagine that being a steel tank.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

exactly as I was taught in First Aid. Any tank of oxy (be sure it is oxy and not just compressed air) will do in an emergency but use medical for extended periods.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
AZ Nomad wrote:

Nope, exactly the opposite.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Your assertion is in direct opposition to purity standards especially those regarding impurities.
Why don't you make a slight attempt to educate yourself?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
AZ Nomad wrote:

Why don't you do some research? I actually use O2 regularly, both for welding / cutting as well as for breathing and nitrox blending. I'm well aware of the fact that the welding O2 purity standard is tighter than the standard for medical O2, as well as the fact that all grades of O2 from any of the large gas suppliers exceeds both the welding and medical purity standards by a significant margin.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It isn't. Read on impurities, not just the main percentage of O2.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/18/2010 10:17 PM, BQ340 wrote:

Next time watch the significant difference on how medical use vs other tanks are filled. Any medical use tanks are first evacuated to insure there is nothing else in the tank before it is filled.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
George wrote:

How exactly could something get into the tank in the first place?
If it's connected to a manifold system, then yes, the gas from a higher-pressure tank could flow into it. But doesn't that higher-pressure tank already contain known-pure O2?
If it's never connected to a manifold system or to another tank, then how exactly could something get into it? Deliberate tampering?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Temperature changes. If you have an open tank and let the gas inside expand, then contract, it will draw in outside air, moisture, or whatever. Leave that tank long enough and you can get all sorts of contamination, not all of which is harmful, but it would still not meet medical criteria.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Some Guy wrote:

If the other tank contained, say, acetylene.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Acetylene in an oxygen tank is a bomb. It could get contaminated by bacteria from the "breathing" that happens when you leave the valve open but most real welders will turn the tank back in with a little pressure in it, Same for SCUBA folks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/19/2010 8:05 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

You typically never allow the pressure to drop to zero because higher pressure in the tank is the only way to keep ambient moisture from entering the tank. Ultimately it's to keep the tank from rusting on the inside.
Jay
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That is exactly why medical oxygen thanks have to be evacuated. Rare that one would come back with any pressure at all.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski wrote:


I would think the contrary.
O2 tanks used by hospitals are more likely to be part of a manifold system, and as such will always be maintained at some positive pressure by virtue of the fact that at least one of their "gang-mates" is likely to have enough excess pressure to keep them partially pressurized.
If a gang of O2 tanks at a hospital collectively fall below some acceptible level of pressure, then they're no longer useful as an air souce and MUST be changed out. So again the argument here is that medical O2 tanks are MORE likely to be returned while still containing some positive pressure charge.
If the strongest argument so far is that a "medical-grade" tank of O2 has lived it's life with minimal to zero infiltration of atmospheric humidity (or even nitrogen) compared to a welding tank, then that's a pretty weak argument to say that a tank of welding O2 is unhealthy to breath. Last I checked, we all take in some some water vapor and nitrogen when we breath standard air.
In other words, a lack of "purity" does not equal unhealthy or hazardous for human breathing. A lack of purity (it seems) will degrade welding performance, maybe mess up equipment, etc.
And so far, it's just been pure speculation here that tanks of welding O2 are *not* evacuated prior to filling, just as supposedly medical tanks are.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/20/2010 7:54 AM, Some Guy wrote:

I can see a huge LOX tank next to a main traffic artery in the Southside neighborhood of Birmingham where UAB Hospital is located. Tanker trucks pull up next to the thing and fill it on a regular basis. The maintenance guys who work for the complex tell me there are tunnels all around under the place filled with all sorts of conduits and pipes that distribute various electrons, liquids and gases that keep the hospital alive. I imagine that LOX tank supplies O2 to the whole hospital and perhaps a couple of different hospitals in the same general area. The hospitals share doctors, why not oxygen?
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Daring Dufas wrote:

LOX is a different situation. It requires a cryogenic storage tank, and perhaps on-site re-compression to boost the pressure of the O2 that's vaporized from the LOX as needed.
We're talking about the bottled O2 that's sold under variously-labelled end-uses by the compressed gas retailer, and whether or not there's any *real* negative health implications when using welding O2 gas instead of "medical" O2 gas in a residential setting.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/20/2010 8:32 AM, Some Guy wrote:

It wouldn't surprise me if the LOX tank is used to fill portable tanks for patient use. I'll have to ask one of my friends who works maintenance at the hospital.
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

LOX tanks fill LOX tanks. They can be filled for patient use of that is what their supplier gives them. They are a different setup that using compressed O2 though. Different tanks, regulators, etc. They are not usually filled at hospital though, but by independent providers.
Compressed tanks either need mechanical pumps or, most home medical suppliers use a cascade system of tanks increasing pressure into the smaller tanks with each on up the line.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/20/2010 10:38 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Hummmm, so you say LOX can't be allowed to boil off into O2 gas and be distributed all over a hospital campus or used to fill portable O2 tanks? UAB hospital has several hospitals next door. The VA, the county hospital, The Eye Foundation and several clinics are all on the same street. Many are connected by skywalks so I have to believe they share resources.
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, not what I said, It is done often for use, but not for filling tanks. What I did was is that the oxygen coming off of the LOX is not of sufficient pressure to fill a compressed tank, you need mechanical pumps to assist. There are small tanks that can be filled with LOX from big tanks and that is allowed for local use or portables. You are confusing two different forms of O2 and the equipment used for them.
UAB hospital has several hospitals next door. The VA, the

I doubt they have a central tank to go that distance, but I've not seen it. Post photos or drawings of the layout when you get them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.