can I fix wood girder "checking" with carriage bolts?

Thanks in advance for your help! Here's my problem:
My 12' high living room ceiling has eight girders made from wood (don't know what kind) measuring 9.5" X 7.5" and spanning two cement block party walls 18' on center. The spacing between these girders is 48". There are 6" X 3" joists notched between these girders at 24" on center. This arrangement supports the flooring on my second floor. All of this is exposed from below for beauty. It is all mortise and tennon.
I had drywall delivered to my second floor (supported by the above describedjoists and girders), and the unloaders placed at least 100 sheets of 5/8" fire rated 4 X 9 panels on one pile right in the middle of the span of one of the girders!!!!! One of the 9.5 X 7.5 girders sagged and has serious "checking" along the middle 80% of its span (some checks seem to be 3/4". There are also some splits in the 6 X 3 joists, but I am really worried about that one 9.5 X 7.5 girder.
Can I fix this girder by screwing appropriate carriage bolts, say 7" X 3/8" at regular intervals and tighten them is some sequence that carefully pulls in the checking?
Please help me sleep at night.
Fran
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you need to have a local engineer come out and look at this. i personally wouldn't sleep under it.
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Call your insurance adjuster (or your lawyer)...
John

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It would help to see a picture, but that guy shouldnt have stacked all that weight in one place, he knows better. Glue and bolts may work, but you need someone to look at it. As others have said, you may have a claim against the drywall delivery people.
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snipped-for-privacy@bellatlantic.net (Fran) writes:

That's not checking, that is beam failure. The drywall company owes you a new beam.
--
http://home.teleport.com/~larryc

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On 13 Nov 2003 12:39:34 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@bellatlantic.net (Fran) wrote:

You really need to talk with a mechanical (structural) engineer to assess the situation. You are probably looking at a replacement beam made of wood sandwiched steel. Checking indicates your beam has "failed." I would get the weight off the second floor ASAP and get a temporary support pole.
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Yes, drywall people DEFinitely should know better. Get support pole such as a 4x4 or two 2x4 nailed together, an engineer, and an insurance adjuster.
(Fran) wrote:

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