bye-bye land line telephone

Page 1 of 6  
Today I got connected to internet telephone service for my home - the old land line still has dial tone but only gets the "not connected" message when used. The hub that the internet company provides has only one RJ-11 phone port - but four < 3 unused > RJ-45 LAN ports. What is my easiest route to connect my 3 or 4 home telephones to the new system ? 1. go to the interface box on the outside wall of my house and disconnect the incoming Bell line ; then run a new phone line from here to the hub ? < the hub needs to be located centrally in the house - not near the Bell interface > 2. other ideas ? Thanks in advance. John T.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/11/2016 06:43 PM, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

No , don't mess with the incoming lines, there should be a phone out put jack on your gateway router...that's what you use.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But I need to get all the home phones - somehow - into the single port on the hub ... doing it "en masse" via the interface seemed most efficient - but I'm no expert, to say the least - so I'm looking for ideas .. John T.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/11/2016 5:03 PM, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

You don't need to go *to* the interface. Every phone jack in your home already goes there! All you need to do is sever the phone company's connection to your house. I.e., "unplug the RJ11" that's in the TNI box.
Then, just find a nearby jack to pick up the EXISTING wiring to those other phones.
(Note that if the closest jack is in use with a phone, you can buy one of those little "Y connectors" that lets you connect two PHONES (or a phone+answering machine) to a single jack. The Y adapter won't care whether "you" are a phone, answering machine OR a VoIP gateway!
"Wire is wire"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I always wondered what would happen if I switched all my phones to VOIP, on my dialup internet service, and then had my phone service disconnected..... :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, May 11, 2016 at 7:43:38 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

Yes, one way is to do what you said. Disconnect the house wiring from the phone company at the box and run a wire from the new hub to the house phone wiring. Or if there is a house phone jack near the hub, disconnect the phone company at the box, then run a wire from the house jack to the hub.
Another way would be to put the hub where you have a cordless phone base station and just use cordless in the house. That's what I did. You can get a new 4 phones plus answering machine for $50
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 11 May 2016 16:59:55 -0700 (PDT), trader_4

Why not just unplug "the house" from the Dmark box outside and plug the output of your VOIP into any empty jack. They are all wired together. They don't know where the signal comes from.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/11/2016 06:59 PM, trader_4 wrote:
[snip]

When I got cable phone, I had a multi-handset cordless phone, and put the base there their adapter (called a MTA) was going. The company (Suddenlink) insisted on sending an installer just to plug it in and that's all I let him do. After the old phone line quit working (it took almost a day), I disconnected the incoming phone line and used the existing wiring to connect other phones.
Make sure you never have the new phone adapter connected to the old phone line.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/11/2016 4:43 PM, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

<frown> Your choice. (We keep our land line because it has mandated availability/reliability guarantees)

Presumably, all that same "number"?

You need to see what the VoIP gateway is capable of driving before you saddle it with 4 loads. At the very least, you will need to verify how many "REN's" (Ringer Equivalence Numbers) it can drive. Then, examine each of your "3 or 4 home telephones" to see what sort of REN's each represents. If your loads exceed the capabilities of the VoIP gateway, you'll have to take other steps to make them work.

The obvious other option is just to disconnect TPC from your interface box (so YOU aren't trying to push signal OUT onto the incoming line). Then, run a RJ11 cable from the VoIP gateway to the nearest "telephone jack" inside your home. It will be wired to all of the other, similar, jacks throughout your home.
If they made provisions for TWO lines to come into your home (often on an unused pair of a 2-6 pair cable), then you can also try to chase down the uncommitted end of that cable and use it as a vector onto the "used" pair).
Again, disconnecting the phone company from your home AT the network interface for the reason outlined above.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/11/2016 7:04 PM, Don Y wrote:

[snip]

Taking into account the REN situation that Don mentions, his second option is exactly what I did when we gave up our landline in favor of our cellular phones. We bought a Siemens Gigaset which connects via Bluetooth to our cell phones whenever we are in range (our model will accept up to three cell phones and port them to the hardwired home phone system. All we do is plug in a single RJ11 cable from the Gigaset to the nearest telephone jack and we were done. The Gigaset gives us incoming and outgoing call capabilities on all three lines through a Panasonic cordless phone with FOUR extensions and an POTS or two scattered throughout the house. We do not miss the landline at all.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 11 May 2016 19:14:10 -0500, Unquestionably Confused

Thanks for the ideas - much appreciated. I'm leaning toward the cordless phone option .. We have a 2-phone cordless now - buy another & a Y-adapter or replace with a 4 phone set ... I just hate the idea of scrapping these gadgets every 5 years ! ... my 3 home phones are all 20 years old & working fine. John T.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/11/2016 7:39 PM, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

John, if you follow through in the manner that Don, I and others suggest you can pretend that you're still bent over and taking it from Ma Bell/AT&T and buy what you want to use in the house, when you want to buy it. That said, the quality of the newer 5ghz cordless phones is really quite good. As I said, we miss landlines not at all.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/11/2016 5:39 PM, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

SWMBO *prefers* the cordless phones as they have a speakerphone option. She'd much rather hold the phone in her lap and talk normally than have to hold it up to her ear.
I keep a (genuine) "trimline" phone hanging in the closet as a fallback. And, the "long range" cordless base there as well.
[I've been migrating everything over to VoIP *inside* the house... but still tethered to a land-line service! The magic of PSTN gateways! :> ]
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John,

When I first switched to VOIP, I simply disconnected the incoming cable from the phone company and fed back through the existing phone wiring in the house. It worked fine.
However, somewhere down the line I had a problem with the phone wiring in the house. I have numerous cables running indoors and a few to outbuildings as well. Rather than fuss with tracking down the wiring problem, I just abandoned the wires and bought a cordless phone system. The base unit connects directly to my VOIP adapter, and all the other handsets are wireless. I can move them anywhere in the house, even if there are no phone jacks.

You might check to see if additional handsets are still available for your existing phone system. I bought an extra handset for my Panasonic so I could have a phone out in the garage. I got the part number right off one of the existing handsets.
Otherwise, a new phone system is relatively inexpensive and will bring everything up to modern standards.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 11 May 2016 20:39:15 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

Sometimes you can buy more extensions for the current phone. In my case it was cheaper to buy a whole second phone with a base station and a cordless phone, or maybe I bought that one first, but at least 3 extensions work with either base station (which has either a corded or non-cordedd phone.)
One of the buttons to answer the phone is taking a little extra pressure and I should buy a spare before they're all gone from ebay.

Absolutelyh

I haved one phone that is 50 years old and working fine, though it's hard to get to and rarely used, and another phone that's 60 or 70 years old and works fine. I'd put it in the living room but there's no jack and hard to ilnstall. ...Wait, that must be why I bought the wireless jack. But the phones I use are about 10 y.o.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/13/2016 01:51 AM, Micky wrote:
[snip]

I have a 3-handset cordless phone that allows up to 10 handsets. I looked on the internet for extra handsets and they cost so much I was better off buying another system (and that comes with an extra base, too).
[snip]
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 5/13/2016 9:55 AM, Mark Lloyd wrote:

I think the reasoning is that: - not many people (relatively speaking) want extra bases (so, quantities are lower, shelf space gets wasted on products with low turnover, etc.) - people who want more, can *afford* to pay more (for the convenience of having interchangeable handsets)
Be careful running multiple bases concurrently. Some may not like this.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 13 May 2016 10:25:28 -0700, Don Y

You also want to be careful what frequency they are on. One of my neighbors is on 900mz and I get them on my wireless headset. I had to move my audio to another channel.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 05/13/2016 01:09 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
[snip]

With some of the older (pre-900MHz?) cordless phones, you had to exchange it with one that used a different channel if you had interference. IIRC, 900MHz devices let you change the channel. Later ones should automatically find a clear channel.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us/
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 13 May 2016 10:25:28 -0700, Don Y

I'm figuring by now, several years later, base stations have broken or they've upgraded, so Ebay would be the place for extra handesets.

I figured he meant it was a spare, for when the first one breaks, like I have it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.