Burnt electrical outlet and plug

Page 3 of 3  


There is something wrong with that plug. Open it up and look inside.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/9/2011 10:18 PM, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Replace the plug. It has a poor connection that resulted in overheating which was left go until it ruined the outlet... and then ruined the other outlet. The average person thinks they are safe from electrical fires if the fuses/breakers work, and there is no short circuits. The truth is that most electrical fires are due to poor connections... just like you have. It should have been repaired after it burnt up the first outlet. Be sure to replace the outlets also. If you can't replace the plug and the outlets, please call a qualified electrician before you burn down the office.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 09 Jan 2011 22:50:51 -0500, Tony Miklos

Is the "conditioner" the plug is on a Ferro-resonant transformer type AC Voltage regulator? They can be really nasty to a high-resistance connection - a lot worse than a non-resonant load.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why are two outlets discolored? Is it a fuse or a circuit-breaker, fuses blow, circuit breakers trip, you mixed up words for both devices, which is it?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

My neighbour had a fire in an 4-outlet box(industry quality) 4 days ago. Turned out, one of the screws was not tightened enough, the insulation had burned off 2 inches of wire, and a short developed, where the wire touched the other feed wire, but current was not enough to trip the fuse, because there was no actual metal contact, just carbonized insulation(when hot, that conducts). After checking out the whole box, 6 screws turned out to be tightened rather sloppy. So, it might be prudent to check out wiring and screws in your office.
In our case, the outlets were high quality, but assembly sucked. The outlet in question fell apart when checked out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/9/2011 9:18 PM, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

bad connection inside the plug. The outlet is probably ok.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 1/10/2011 1:33 AM, Steve Barker wrote:

I hate to believe someone actually might not replace the outlets after they have been overheated so bad. The connection will surely be corroded and lost most of its spring tension.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Best way to sell a house now days. When you get an arc going all bets are off as to how much heat is generated and woe to you if the wall has flammable covering or a curtain is against it. Ever do any arc welding? From the looks of the photos though this one looks like it might have been to much current going through a bad internal connection for to long of time. And probably someone didn't get a good connection when they attached the plug to the wire or pinched the wire to much or not enough when attaching the plug. What device or devices is this thing running? It must require lot of current. Things like this are not supposed to happen.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

*The circuit may be rated for 20 amps, but the receptacles and plug are not. Change them both to 20 amps and measure the actual current draw.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nowhere that this kind of outlet is used is it legal for a non- electrician to replace outlets or plugs in an office or workplace. Have an electrician come in and replace both.
If you don't believe me, ask your insurance agent. Better him than the adjuster who comes in after something burns down.
I presume the reason you -- er, "someone" -- put an aftermarket plug on the cord is because the equipment came with a 30A plug, probably a twistlock. You may think that you've loaded it lightly enough that it won't draw more than 15A, but you may be wrong. Have the sparky quote on a proper 30A circuit installation while he's there.
If you do put it all back together in a 15A config, get yourself a Kill-A-Watt or other current monitor and find out what you're really drawing. If it's more than 12A continuous, you should not be on a 15A circuit. Some offices are wired all 12-gauge even on 15A circuits; if that's the case, depending on length and local regs, your electrician may be able to swap in a 20A breaker and T-slot receptacle.
Chip C Toronto
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Maybe that is true in Canada Chip, but here in much of the US it is perfectly OK for maintenance technicians to repair or replace installed electrical devices (outlets, switches and fixtures) with identically rated devices without an electrical license...
Now whether or not the maintenance technician is good at doing that sort of work is an entirely different subject, but it is allowed...
~~ Evan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 10 Jan 2011 21:48:25 -0800 (PST), Evan

It's always been allowed here too (Canada)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.