Brick pavers over old driveway?

My driveway is wearing and I want to replace it with interlocking brick. Can I avoid tearing up the pavement and use this as the base (re-tamp again) for the sand then brick? Tearing up of pavement would be a hard task for an old timer like myself. Disposing of the old pavement would be equally as hard on a fixed income. This will be a DIY project.
Thank you
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snipped-for-privacy@nf.sympatico.ca wrote:

Well you did not tell us what your current drive is made if. I have seen gravel, concrete, asphalt, etc.
My question is have you considered that you would be adding the at least a couple inches of sand plus the height of the brick. Do you want your drive that much higher? I would also want to make sure you have good drainage through the drive. From here I can't tell. :-)
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Joseph Meehan

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Joseph Meehan wrote:

The surface is asphalt and the current driveway slopes down at an angle so the extra height would not be a problem. During rain there appears to be good drainage as there is no standing water.
ty
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snipped-for-privacy@nf.sympatico.ca wrote:

I don't think I would want to do it on asphalt. You want drainage to go down through the base into the soil, not run off. With an asphalt base the water would go there, then it would be stopped. I would expect problems. I can't help by think the extra height would have to be a problem as well.
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On Thu, 27 Jul 2006 19:21:13 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"

I do a lot of strange things with pavers, I got a truckload for free. I built a fireplace and tiled the walls of my shed and outside bar with them. I agree if he is in a freeze thaw place I would worry about them heaving up but if he is one of us sub tropical folks I would just stick them down with thinset, like tile and be happy.
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Besides the height issue of adding at least 6 inches to the surface height, I would think there will be problems with the pavement trapping water and heaving. Do you live in a hard freeze area?
How is the drivevway "wearing"? There may be resurfacing options. Many places will hot-top the driveway, which is essentially a skim coat of new asphalt. It works OK, and can buy you a bunch more years on aging pavement.
snipped-for-privacy@nf.sympatico.ca wrote:

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There is also the tar and chip scenario which may give more mongevity than a skim coat. One other issue that I would be concerned about, Ty, is water washing the sand from between the pavers. Since they will be above grade on the edges the joints which terminate there will tend to shed sand. That will probably progresseively worsen and creep inward making the pavers loose. Then, you're out there resetting some pavers every couple of years. Now, that may be acceptable maintenance for you but I thought that I'd bring it up. Good luck with the project and post back with your progress.
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