Brass cleanout plugs


I have a few brass cleanout plugs on cast iron risers, they probably have not been opened in 30 years and would not come out. I tried a 18" wrench and even a chisel with a hammer to try to drift it open and it would not move an inch. Soaked with WD-40 let sit for an hour tried again no luck.
I think my only option left is a desctructive method.
Can I drill a hole and start a cut with sawzall to cut a piece out (like a slice of cake)? and then use a plier to pull it out once a slice is removed? I don't care about the plug I can replace it with PVC plugs, but I don't want to destroy the threads (or whatever threads are left).
MC
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The threads may already be shot. I'd try heat next. Lots of heat.
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I would heat the pipe up with a good torch, and then put some ice on the plug to shrink it. The a wrench and a long extension on the plug and an accomplice to hit the plug with a hammer.
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After you get it real hot, squirt some penetrating oil on the seam. The chilling effect of putting the penetrating oil on the hot metal causes it to suck the oil into the threads. Did this many times in my fathers auto repair shop to get rusted parts apart without damage. Then heat again and use a BIG wrench, possibly with a pipe a few feet long on the end of it. If that fails destroy it and replace it.
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MiamiCuse wrote:

futilely to open up my basement floor drain, he didn't even try wrenching them. He just whacked them on the edge with a drift and a BFH. They popped right out, visibly potato-chipped. Maybe you need a bigger H.
-- aem sends...
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Try Liquid Wrench, let it soak & tap on it a bit, let it soak longer.
Use a larger wrench (18" isn't very big) , 24" or larger........ tighten first, then loosen.''
cheers Bob
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Our plumbers might try one half hearted time to turn out a brass plug. If it doesn't turn first lick, the next tool is a hammer with a chisel. They are kinda meant to be expendable.
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Yes use a hammer on the edge of it a few times soak in wd40 then tighten a then lossen , if no success use chisel on very edge of plug and hammer it out replace with abs plug use vasiline on the threads to stop this problem .
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I don't care about the plug I can replace it. But I cannot get it out no matter what I tried. I did not hammer it REAL hard I didn't want to crack the cast riser and turn this small problem into a bug problem.
There is no edge exposed in that the plug is recessed deeper than the edge of the riser, the only access I have is from the top, and it has a square knob but my largest plier would not even do anything.
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MiamiCuse wrote:

necessary. It'll come out.
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I've seen 6 and 12. But, an 8 point socket? That's likely to cost more than the job is worth. Bigger pipe wrench comes to mind. Cutting the brass plug with a sawzall is also sensible.
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MC-
Sorry to not answer your original questions...yes, you can cut the plug out.
I use saw cuts at 10 o'clock & 2 o'clock
Make cuts only deep enough to just kiss the the cast iron. The chisel, pry or twist the pieces out.
When you install the new plug, use a soft set dope compatible with the plastic plug (or use brass)
cheers Bob
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Put the pliers away and get a wrench. Now slip a 4' piece of pipe over the handle for real leverage.
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MiamiCuse wrote:

fails, let it cool completely and repeat. Remember, once the plug gets hot, you've not gained anything. You need the cast hot fast and the plug still relatively cool.
s
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.

this is how the pros on this old house do it.
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