Better ideas for fixing leak right at the pool pump inlet (no room!)

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After emptying, cleaning, refilling, and replumbing a cracked Jandy valve, I finally started up the filter & cleaner pumps.
Guess what?
BOTH are leaking at a LOUSY spot!
The water comes out of the INLET side of each of the pumps. There's no room to replumb without ripping out three jandy valves per pump, and emptying the pool again (since the plumbing is five feet below the surface of the pool).
So I'm looking for a leak-fix patch method.
Going to the Saratoga pool store for HASA chlorine (thanks SMC for the 2- for-1 hint), they didn't have anything.
The Leslies near by sold me common silicone glue. The Home Depot sold me heat-cured and pliable-putty epoxy.
I'll try them all ...
But - before I do - what would YOU use to seal this leak?

Note: - Water comes out when the pumps are off. - When the pumps are on, the leak lets in air.
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You don't drain the pool to fix plumbing leaks.
There is some way to close off the pool from your plumbing.
There should be plugs for the inlets and a cover for the outlets.
--
Dan Espen

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On Fri, 25 May 2012 15:11:18 -0400, Dan Espen wrote:

The devil is in the details! :) The pool equipment is a good five feet below the waterline of the pool (I know this because I cut the valve off and then filled the pool too much and it came out the cut pipe).
The valve you speak of is the exact valve I had to replace. It cracked. So, I think, there was no possible way to cut the valve out and replace it without draining the pool at least to the level of the valve itself which was about five feet of water.

Hmmmm... maybe you have an idea there. I have emptied the entire pool and have not seen any 'drains' per se, but, ... are you saying I could have plugged up the dozen holes for the self-cleaning pop-ups and then that would have prevented the water from leaking out when I replaced the cracked Jandy valve?
I 'guess' that's an idea I had never thought of. It seems unworkable for the cleaning system (which has a dozen openings in the pool) ... but ... plugging the five drains 'might' be workable for the filtering system.
The filtering system has two drains in the spa (one is the safety, I believe), and one main drain in the deep end of the pool, and two safety drains on the walls of the pool.
Are you saying, should I need to cut off the three shutoff jandy valves which control the inlet to the filter pump ... that I could plug those five drains instead of draining the pool?
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On Fri, 25 May 2012 18:07:07 -0700, Evan wrote:

Hmmm... not for me ...
Here is a picture of the cracked Jandy valve:

It's almost impossible to get your head down there to even see WHERE the crack was:

Here is what it looked like before removing the cracked valve:

The valve was in the worst place possible:

And here is what it looked like after replacing the cracked valve:

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Don't know. If the pop-ups are not popped up, do they still let water in?

I don't have an in-ground but my above ground has a cap that you screw into the water inlet and a cover you screw over the skimmer (outlet).
With those covered, I can work on all the equipment with a full pool.
It seems logical to me that your in ground pool SHOULD have the same capabilities. It's even more important in your case.
I think you said your main drain is at the bottom of the deep end, Do you have something that covers it or screws on to block it?
--
Dan Espen

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On Sat, 26 May 2012 12:19:00 -0400, Dan Espen wrote:

I suspect they do.

For now, this is a theoretical question because I'm done fixing the broken plumbing. But to answer the questions, when the pool was dry, I removed the main filter inlet cover which is in the floor of the deep end of the pool. The only thing below it is a flush pipe opening set in concrete. There are no threads.
So, any plug would have to be a physical male plug (a female wouldn't work because there's no pipe sticking up to grab onto). It's the same with the safety in the wall at the deep end.
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Based on my experience, just a small block of dry ice is sufficient. I once turned a 2K repair into a $.60 cent repair with dry ice. That was in the 70s.
I'd only suggest dry ice if there was no other way. I think the drains SHOULD have covers.
--
Dan Espen

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On Fri, 25 May 2012 15:11:18 -0400, Dan Espen wrote:

Given this picture of the pool when drained, I suspect the dozen floor pop-up sprayers are pretty hard to plug. Right?
But maybe the five 'main drains' might be easier?
How does one plug that wall drain and the floor drain in this picture?

Here's another wall drain:

There are two more floor drains in the spa.
Do you just shove something inside each of those five main drains?
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As another poster said, a pool store should have the right plugs.
--
Dan Espen

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On Sat, 26 May 2012 15:41:09 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

plug-1-12-inch.aspx
That picture is worth a thousand words!
I now see exactly how this plug would work!
I would simply buy five of them (to be sure), and plug the two drains in the spa floor and the main drain in the deep end floor, and then the two safeties on the walls of the pool.
As long as I'm not working on the cleaning system (which has a dozen pop- up valves in the floor), I could then work on the pool!
Thanks for the information! It's great to know!
Here's the description from that URL:
Tapered Rubber Expansion Plug 1-1/2 inch W1100 Rubber Expansion Plug, Price: $3.79 Our Tapered Expansion Plug features black rubber with stainless steel washers, slotted screw, and easy to turn Wing-Nut handle. Provides a good seal to protect plumbing lines from freeze damage. Plug fits a 1-1/2" Wall Fitting.
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On Fri, 25 May 2012 13:48:02 -0700, Bob F wrote:

Yes. White schedule 40 PVC, painted black (to protect from UV).

Now that is interesting! And inexpensive (I have plenty of the blue PVC glue and it hardens pretty fast). In essence, that's what Leslie's said when they sold the silicone glue to me - they said let it suck itself into the pump.
What I like about your idea is (a) I already had tons of blue stuff ... (b) it's a thinner glue than the silicone glue, and (c) it probably dries quicker and might gum up the pump itself less (because it's thinner).

Good to know it worked with a 'pressure/vacuum' system (a pool can be near 50 psi I'm told). thanks for the great idea!
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On Fri, 25 May 2012 18:02:15 -0700, Bob F wrote:

That was a GREAT idea!


It's still leaking slightly but VASTLY LESS! Thanks!

I think I'll need to choose one of these glues I bought to 'strengthen' the protection over the thin blue PVC glue (and plug the final drip leak):

Q: Now that your suggestion has slowed the huge leak to a drip - what should I put OVER the soft blue glue to protect it from the elements and to make the final seal?
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On Sat, 26 May 2012 04:17:47 +0000, Arklin K. wrote:

BTW, every store I went to sold me a different magic potion so I have all these to choose from.

Even with the GREAT PVC GLUE IDEA!, I 'still' have a (now) small leak at the pump:

Which (magic glue) would you use to: a) Stop the remaining small leak, and, b) Protect the fragile blue PVC plug that I just put in place
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ME??
I would cut the mess apart and redesign it with ease of service as priority #1
So it took a entire day, but will never be a issue again
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+1...
OP or whoever allowed that pool equipment to be installed in that manner got "hosed"...
Definitely not very repair friendly at all...
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Rube would be proud.

I'd say the OP bought a chunk of that "hose", too.
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Isn't that a DE filter in the pic? But he says he has a cartridge filter? Are there two?
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wrote:

Never mind. Took another look at the other thread and that filter is indeed a cartridge filter.
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On Sat, 26 May 2012 15:43:05 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

Looks more like a sand filter to me. That would explain 1/10 of the valves, anyway. ;-)
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On May 26, 7:24pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Per the other thread, it's apparently a cartridge filter. But I agree, I thought it was DE or sand because of the shape and size.
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