Best way to cut off bottom of studs?

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I have a weird problem. I bought a shed with a wooden plywood floor. The guy who built it did some strange things to it. The strangest is that he made the walls with no bottom plate. The 2x4 studs just sit on top of the plywood and he put one 2" drywall screw in each stud. That seemed to work when the shed was at the place it was built, but I moved it about 20 miles. By the time I got it home, the walls were starting to come off the floor. While jacking and leveling the shed the walls were starting to come off the floor completely and once side was almost off when I listed the front to remove the trailer from under the shed floor. I had to add some temporary 2x4s to the exterior of the building and screw them to the walls to keep the walls on the floor.
I decided the only way to fix this is to saw 1 1/2 inches off each stud and add a bottom plate like there should have been in the firsdt place. The problem I am trying to figure out, is how to best saw off this inch and a half. The inside of the shed is just the 2x4s, the exterior is made of 5/8 treated plywood. With the plywood siding, I cant just cut across these studs. I'll be cutting toward the plywood. But what kind of saw should I use?
I have a circular saw, but I dont think I can get it that low, since they table part of this saw. I have a sawsall, but I'd have to lay it flat against the floor, and even then I dont think I can cut off only a inch and a half due to the thickness of the saw body. I also have a saber saaw, which is slow, but at the moment seems to be the only option aside from a hand saw.
Anyone have any other ideas or suggestions.
Thanks JW
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

Though it seems strange to today's standards, my 120 yr old house has no bottom plate. We didn't need any bottom plates until sheetgoods became the quick-and-dirty way to cover a wall.

Bang it back together as best you can. Add a couple of 16D nails to each stud. If you're going to sheetrock it throw a piece of 2x4 in the gap.
If you sell it to someone else that is going to move it tell them to be careful.
Enjoy the shed.
Jim
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

I think I'd add a 2x4 along the inside bottom of the studs then fasten from the outside to it through the siding and studs. I realize there isn't much meat in the ply for the inside 2x4s so I'd glue them to the ply and use screws to hold in place til the glue dries.
--

dadiOH
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dadiOH wrote:

I'd do it this way. It will be effective and be very easy and quick to do. Not sure I'd screw from outside, I'd have to see it.
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nailed to the studs.
He is an idea. Instead of a full lower plate, cut 2 X 4s to fit between the studs. Nail this 2 X 4 to the floor between each stud. Then nail the stud onto each 2 X 4 by nailing through the stud into the end of the 2 X 4. You will have to toe nail the end pieces.
Looks like this would do the job. What do you think>
Bob-tx
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Bob-tx wrote the following:

That's what I would do.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On 7/19/2010 8:04 AM, willshak wrote:

I like this idea the best.
Jay
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wrote:

What am I missing? This adds nothing to the integrity of the shed. If he is going to sheath the inside, then I might go to that trouble. But all he need to do now is re-attach the studs to the floor. If it worked while stationary, then probably the builder hit something substantial with his sheetrock screws.
I say replace the broken/pulled-out ones with 16d nails or deck screws and be done with it.
Jim
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Suggestion The blade on my el cheapo 7.25" circular saw is 1.25 inches from the edge of the bottom plate and it will cut almost 3 inches deep (typical 2 b 4 being some 3.75" thick?) Seems likely that one could make a mark on each stud 1.75 inches from bottom end cut off the end (finsih of with the sawz etc. or hand saw. Probaly on about 40 cuts in total? Then slip pieces of 2 by 4 under each stud. Question does the 2 by 4 'bottom plate' have be a one continuous piece? Perhaps individual bits under each stud each long enough to be nailed down both side of the stud? Or; pull the studs down to floor level by some means (a pulley etc.) and run a piece of 90 degree metal flashing along the angle between the floor and each stud screwing it to both floor and each stud through the metal; that should hold it together? It is not essential to have a bottom 2 by 4 plate! unless you want to use some sort of wall board inside? And even then some scarp blocks of 2 by tacked in between each pair of studs .....would be enough to nail to. A cordless or electric drill/screw-gun might be useful with long enough screws to to reach whatever is under the edge of the floor. Some 3.5 inch construction screw put in with a drill can provide a lot of power to pull those studs down to bottom on the floor.
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This is the only valid idea. It's really a no-brainer if you stop and think about it.
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On 7/19/2010 5:40 AM, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

each stud with the 4" dimension vertical. It could then be nailed or screwed to each stud and then the 2x4 could be toe nailed or screwed to the plywood floor ... sort of like a baseboard. Maybe even a 1x4 would work just as well, but the 2x4 would give a little better attachment to the floor. Or, you could even notch the 1x4 into each stud, but that would be a lot more work.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

Since you aren't building a piano, If you are good with a chainsaw and have one with a sharp chain you can cut them off and then clean up the cut with something like this, http://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/multifunction-tools.html I'd use long screws toenailed in when putting in new plate.
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On Jul 19, 4:40am, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

I'd just get a joist hanger for each one.
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On Jul 19, 5:40am, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

You could use metal connectors, like Simpson Strong-tie makes, to attach each stud to the plywood. The big box stores have a good selection to choose from.
R
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Bob TX has the best and easy solution. See his reply. WW
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why cut them at all, put the plate under the existing studs? Mark
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WW wrote: ...

I don't know about "best" altho is "easy"...
Like Jim E I don't see much point in the baseplate fill-in unless OP is going to sheetrock or otherwise panel the interior.
What he really needs is a tight connection to keep wind forces from ripping a side loose during a storm and for that I'd suggest ties near the corners and 1-2 along the walls depending on how long they are as being adequate for most anything; I think the one on every stud is way overkill for the purpose. Other than that, I'd do as Jim says and simply toenail w/ 16's and go on.
--
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On Jul 19, 5:40am, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

Why do people have to come up with the most asinine and complicated solutions?
If you're bent on having a bottom plate, then finish the job and knock the walls clear of the floor. Add your bottom plate. Toe nail the studs back to the bottom plate. Done.
Most shed kits are designed with no bottom plate. You're not talking about a major structure here, only a 6' tall, 10x10 shed. Works fine.
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On Mon, 19 Jul 2010 10:38:29 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

This is not a kit. It's also much bigger. 12' X 16' and 10' high. The walls are all 3/4" plywood, and when they started to shift off the floor, they were very heavy to get back in place. The roof is 2x6s spaced 12" apart with 3 of them sandwiched together in the middle of the roof. The floor has doubled 2x6's spaced every 12" and the outer edge of the floor, they' spaced six inches apart. The shingled roof has 3/4' plywood under it.
I bought this shed where several houses were moved away, or torn down, because of being in a flood plain, the county made them move. The shed was to be sold or demolished. I got it cheap, but whoever built it, really did things strangely. Moving this shed about 20 miles was quite the ordeal, the things is amazingly heavy with all that excess dimentional lumber on floor and roof and all that 3/4" plywood. Yet, they hardly attached the walls to the floor. One 2" drywall screw only into the plywood. By the time I got it off the trailer, the walls were coming off the floor and I had to bolt angle iron to the walls and floor on the exterior to keep it from coming all trhe way off the floor and collapsing with that heavy roof. Even more strange is that the builder put the 2x6 roof joists INSIDE the 2x4 walls.... Not on top of them, but inside them, then he added a horizontal 2x4 against the studs on the inside to hold them up.
The walls are standing right on top of the floor, so I can see the edges of the plywood from the outside. So, there's nothing holding the walls to the floor except my angle iron right now, and even a few of them pulled loose when I was levelling the floor. When it rains, water runs across the floor because the water runs down the wall and comes in under the plywood walls.
I'm not going to tear it down and start over, just patch it together so the walls are attached well to the floor and I guess I'll have to just caulk around the edge to keep water out. Although I did think about using some sort of steel or aluminum trim around the base to cover the edge of the plywood floor and push it up under the wall plywood. That will keep water out.
I have never seen anything built like this. I have built lots of things over the years and this is just not right. Yet, it's a nice shed, I just need to fix this walls to floor screwup. Heck, just levelling the floor made a whole corner nearly slip off the floor. I had to add more angle iron strips. The other thing, the guy must have spent a fortune on all those 2x6's and treated 3/4" plywood, yet he only put about 12 screws in each full sheet of wall plywood. I'm just going to add some galv nails, as well as put furring strips on all the plywood seams.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com wrote:

Stick flashing up under the plywood sides. You could also bend it out and add a 1x and bend the flashing over the top and sides of that if that was needed. Any caulking job would always be half assed and leak. Flashing, not much else would fix that. You can even get some colored stuff and paint it to match the shed. I wouldn't try painting bare aluminum.
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