Best quick-connect for rope?

I want to make circles of various sizes out of nylon rope to use as targets for practicing short golf shots. The method I am using calls for the target circle to have a radius that is 1/10 of the length of the shot. If I am practicing 10-yard chip shots, I would need a target circle with a radius of 1 yard. For 30-yard pitch shots, I'd need a target circle with a radius of 3 yards.
I would like to make up a bunch of lengths of rope that are each 2-pi yards long (about 6' 4") with some type of "connector" on the ends so that I could connect as many as I need to make targets with radii of 1, 2, 3, ... yards.
I have thought of several solutions, but they all have problems. Can anyone suggest another approach?
Here's what I've considered:
1. Make each length a bit longer and simply tie them together using a square knot. This is probably the method I will use since it is simple and easy to use. The only disadvantage is that it is not as quick as using some sort of locking hook.
2. Make a small loop in one end and put a knot in the other. Connect the sections by pushing the knotted end through the loop. This is a simple solution and is a bit quicker than the square knot. The resulting circle is not as smooth.
3. Make a loop in one end and attach a locking snap connector to the other end. This would be a little quicker than the previous solution and would make a smoother circle, but it requires hardware.
4. Overlap the ends and secure them with velcro tape or some sort of clamp. This is probably more trouble than it is worth.
I only need 5-6 targets, so I could just make each one from a single piece of rope and permanently connect the ends, but having the 2-pi lengths provides more flexibility and the connectors make it easy to "read" the size of the circle at a glance.
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Why do you need the rope to be the exact length? You're learning golf, not geometry. Use a length of rope that is as long as necessary for the biggest target circle. For smaller target circles just overlap the rope. You can paint colored marks on the rope or use tape to indicate the appropriate length rope to use for a particular target size.
The target does not have to be perfectly circular, either. Oval would be better for a number of reasons. Generally you're looking to avoid constraints that are either lateral or linear. If you can hit the target more accurately in the more important direction, a little leeway in the other direction is usually acceptable.
R
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5. Splice the rope ends together. Any Eagle Scout, sailboat owner, farmer, oil rig roughneck, or rancher can show you how. There may even be a few Navy people that know how. It's surprisingly easy to do, and a good trick to have when you don't want tp make a long trip to the store to replace a broken rope. Around here, I always splice a loop in the end of a new rope as a handy way to cinch a load of stuff to drag to another location or whatever. Plus it keeps the rope from fraying. HTH
Joe
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Why not put a small loop in one end and thread the other end through it. Then if you mark the rope you just pull through to you get the distance you want.
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On Mon, 20 Apr 2009 13:46:18 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

That's brilliant!!! Brilliant, I tell you. ;-)
This has the added advantage of providing for intermediate sizes.
The extra rope can be laid alongside the circle. If the extra rope creates too much clutter, I can make 2-3 sizes.
Thank you very much.
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For your small loop, you can use a reduced-coil hangman's noose:
http://www.geocities.com/roo_two/hangmansnoose.html
It'll allow easy adjustment of how snug the loop is.
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On Mon, 20 Apr 2009 13:46:36 -0700 (PDT), mike

Good suggestion. I was just going to make a permanent fixed loop with plenty of room for the other end. I hadn't decided how to secure the loose end (velcro, piece of string, clamp, nothing, ???). It doesn't need to be tight as it won't have any force on it.
I'll probably experiment a little.
Thanks.
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Maybe I'm missing something here, but how does it matter if the ends are loose, if the circle is perfectly round, if the circle is _exactly_ five feet in diameter (or whatever)? Are you that good that if the rope is off by three inches it will make a difference? How does it improve anything by having a perfectly round circle of totally arbitrary diameter as your target?
Oh, sorry, I just noticed your screen name...never mind.
R
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wrote:

Glad that helped. Sometimes throwing out a question to the groups will give an answer that you would never have thought of. YOu may have to sort through a bunch of ideas, but one may be just the thing.
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On Mon, 20 Apr 2009 16:21:50 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

Quite right. This time, it seems to have struck pay dirt.
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Square Peg wrote:

it's nearly tight. If you expect a 10" overlap, slide it 9" from the end. Apply the other rubber band to the other end and slide back 9".
Then tuck each end of the rope under the rubber band that was put around the other end. The loop will lie flat, can be shaped as you wish, and can be adjusted quickly and precisely.
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