Best mosquito killer?

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Asian Tigers require Lurex attractant in your MM, not the octenol that comes with it and is available at HD. Asian Tigers only bite in the middle of the day.
I'm in Fort Worth and we don't seem to have any Asian Tigers around here.
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wrote:

LOL!
Isn't Lurex a trade name for a fabric? It is not to be confused with a different product of the same namefrom American Biophysics [can you say "trade name theft"?], which more than likely contains octanol [not to be confused with octenol].
If I were the Dow Badische company, I'd sue the bastards.
-- -john wide-open at throttle dot info
~~~~~~~~ The time to repair the roof is when the sun is shining - JFK ~~~~~~~~
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Bat house are good.
Google up BCI or Bat conservancy International. As a spelunker I can attest to their voracity.
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Get a bat. Not a baseball bat....a real bat. They love mosquito's.
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On Wed, 07 Jul 2004 17:46:21 GMT, "suzn"
:) Get a bat. :) Not a baseball bat....a real bat. :) They love mosquito's.
Interesting article from the Texas Mosquito Control Association site http://www.texasmosquito.org/bats.html
Lar. (to e-mail, get rid of the BUGS!!
It is said that the early bird gets the worm, but it is the second mouse that gets the cheese.
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Hmmm...
For more bat information...
Go to the, already mentioned, Bat Conservation International at: http://www.batcon.org / use their search and see numerous articles about bats and mosquitos, some by Dr. Tuttle (whom I have met on numerous occasions). I would venture a guess that he is THE world expert on bats.
The largest bat population in the world is in a cave in Central Texas, Bracken Bat Cave. I have visited there many, many times. Bracken is a nursery colony, the females give birth and raise young there, most of the bachelors are under the Congress Stree bridge in Austin. These are Mexican Freetails.
Estimates of insect consumption per year are well over 6,000 tons.
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Its quite a show at sunset isn't it?
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Yes, very neat (stinky too)!
The REAL show is at Bracken - bigger-better-faster-stronger! It's like a 50 foot wide tornado rising out of the sinkhole to treetop level, where it runs off over the trees like a river for a mile or two. The Red Tailed hawks come in and snatch them out of the aerial stream for snacks! I've even witnessed rattlesnakes grabbing them out of the air from the entrance wall. Every now and then you can see the rare albinos in the vortex, they stick out well against the dark wall of bats. These are Mexican Freetail bats. They winter in South America, although a small few stay year around in the cave.
A fellow here in central Texas, has created a man made bat cave. He enlisted the help of the Bat Conservancy to design it. The whole purpose was to mine guano. He laid a concrete slab of a couple of acres and used rebar and steel to build domes, which he then gunnited and then he buried the whole thing in earth (basically an upsidedown pool). The entrance is just large enough for a front-end loader to go in and scoop the poop. It's been very successful.
There is another cave at Kickapoo Caverns State Park that has a very nice bat flight, Stewart Bat Cave. I did some volunteer work there at the cave for the Park service a few times. It used to be a shelter for goats and sheep!
Yet another bat flight is at an old railroad tunnel out near -I wanna say- Beorne? or is it Frederickburg? I've not visited that one.
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The railroad tunnel is between Boerne and Fredericksburg. Beautiful rolling hills. Nice drive.
Jeepers wrote:

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wrote:

would a baseball "bat" work on mosquitoes?
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There is no magic cure to eliminate large numbers of mosquitoes in your yard without repeatedly spraying your yard with insecticides, as many cities in this country have resorted to doing. It does work, though - my parents who now live in Florida say there are less mosquitoes there (where spraying is a common occurrence) than there are in Iowa.
First I'll discuss some things that DON'T work or have very little effect:
Electronic repellers. Studies have shown that female mosquitoes do not flee from male mosquitoes and mosquitoes as a whole will not flee the area from dragonflies. They will not prevent mosquitoes from biting.
Bug zappers. They look cool and can be cheap entertainment on a summer night, but studies have shown that biting insects only make up around 1% of the take. Reasons not to get them include killing beneficial insects and potential spreading of disease by exploding insect bodies (NEVER place these near areas where there is food or people eating).
Citrosa plants. Mosquitoes will land on it, proving that it does not produce enough citronella oil to repel insects.
Citronella candles or incense. They only work for the area downwind of the smoke. One study showed citronella candles being 42% more effective at preventing bites on people near the candles versus no candles, but even ordinary candles were 23% more effective (the incense was no more effective than the regular candles).
Bats/purple martins/swallows. Purple martin colonies need maintenance while swallows and bats are potential health hazards. All for creatures for which mosquitoes make up only a small portion of their diet at best (they are opportunistic and will go for larger prey like flies, dragonflies, and beetles before settling for huge numbers of mosquitoes).
What DOES work:
Knowing your enemy. It's easier to kill them in the larval stage than in the adult stage. While some mosquitoes can travel upwards of 30 miles, the Culex mosquito (thought to be the primary carrier of the West Nile Virus) will only fly .5 to 1.5 miles from their breeding site. Some won't go farther than 200-300 yds from where they breed. Also see if you can find out (from your local public health department?) what species are most active. You can have dozens of species of mosquito in the same area, all with different behaviors (day vs night biters, whether they bite or not), risks of carrying disease, and breeding behavior (some need a puddle, some need a wet piece of ground that will dry out and get wet again).
Go on a thorough mosquito-proofing venture in your home and neighborhood. Eliminate places where water is left standing (old tires, trash left outside, blocked gutters, buckets, childrens swimming pools, tarps, flowerpot saucers, pet dishes). Birdbaths and wading pools should have their water changed at least once a week. If you have ponds, stock them with mosquito fish or treat them with larvicide. Cover or drill holes in the bottom of any containers that must remain outside (like garbage cans or tire swings). Fix leaking hoses or water pipes. If you have depressions where water collects (old stumps, low areas in your yard), fill them in. If a puddle of water lasts undisturbed for 4 days near your house, it can potentially breed mosquitoes. Be careful of taking any action on ditches near your home as they may be protected wetlands.
Mosquitoes rest in weeds and vegetation during their inactive periods, so keep your yard and surrounding areas mowed and use a weed whacker to eliminate tall grass from around your house that your mower may not be able to reach. You can apply residual insecticides to vegetation (like flowers) that you can't or don't want to eliminate.
Foggers can provide temporary relief by killing mosquitoes in the vegetation. It will not work in the long-term but works great if you're having a planned family gathering. Spray during the early morning or evening as rising air currents from the heat of the day will make the fog rise and be ineffective. If you have an event, spray the morning before, evening before, and the morning the day of for maximum effectiveness.
A pesticide-free way to protect family gatherings outside is with electric fans. Mosquitoes hate strong wind currents.
Mosquito traps. They do work, but they are expensive and there is still a lot of debate over how much area they really protect (I wouldn't give them any more credit than a few hundred yards downwind). They are also not a method of sole mosquito control. If you are depending on them as such, you are wasting your money.
- Joanne
If everyone in the country would spend just one afternoon finding and eliminating sources of standing water around their homes, there would be a massive decrease in mosquito populations.
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Okay, not exactly what I asked for, but can I make smoke with "hickory chunks" and such and hope that it will chase mosquitos away>?
i
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Smoke would be better than nothing and that's about all that can be said on the matter. If you're going to do smoke, why not try tiki torches with citronella-treated oil around the perimeter?
Personally I would suggest candles, electric fans, and plenty of DEET-containing insect repellent.
- Joanne (who is currently scratching several bug bites from the July 4th weekend at the cabin)
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Sorry if someone already mentioned this, which I read on a household tips page last week (I haven't tried it): "Put some water in a white dinner plate and add a couple drops of Lemon Fresh Joy dish detergent. Set the dish on your porch, patio, or other outdoor area. Not sure what attracts them, the lemon smell, the white plate color, or what, but mosquitoes flock to it, and drop dead shortly after drinking the Lemon Fresh Joy/water mixture, and usually within about 10 feet of the plate. Check this out---it works just super! May seem trivial, but it may help control mosquitoes around your home, especially in the South and elsewhere where the West Nile virus is reaching epidemic proportions in mosquitoes, birds, and humans."
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:Sorry if someone already mentioned this, which I read on a household ;tips page last week (I haven't tried it): :"Put some water in a white dinner plate and add a couple drops of Lemon ;Fresh Joy dish detergent. Set the dish on your porch, patio, or other :outdoor area. Not sure what attracts them, the lemon smell, the white ;plate color, or what, but mosquitoes flock to it, and drop dead shortly :after drinking the Lemon Fresh Joy/water mixture, and usually within ;about 10 feet of the plate. Check this out---it works just super! May :seem trivial, but it may help control mosquitoes around your home, ;especially in the South and elsewhere where the West Nile virus is :reaching epidemic proportions in mosquitoes, birds, and humans."
See http://www.snopes.com/spoons/oldwives/dishsoap.htm
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snipped-for-privacy@myri.com (Wen-King Su) wrote:

(original poster here) Yuk, yuk! I mighta known it was a hoax!
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Of course you haven't. If you had, you would know it does not work.
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wrote:

I tried it as of yesterday. In a few hours since it looked like rain I moved the plate under the eave. It had a small mosquito in it at that time. This morning i checked it and there were 4 dead mosquitos in it.....all small. Does that mean males? The biters around here have a wingspan of about 1 1/2 inches.
I am looking for a natural mosquito repellant. Not 'natural' as in a tube or spray of something at the store for $5 but natural as in what might be around the house.
FACE
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ONE AND A HALF INCHES!? Man I dunno....
--
It's no good unless it makes your eyes water.

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Jeepers wrote:

"Let's eat him in here. If we carry him outside the big guys will take him."
--
Cheers,
Bev
ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
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