Bathtub wall replacing


We took down the tile and found that the drywall had mold. I was told this was the original tile from 1972. Took out the old drywall and tile and put new greenboard up and tiled her up again. My guess is this should last over 20yrs or so. So why would I spend $2000.00 - $3000.00 on cement board and Ditra system when this will last well over 10yrs and would be easy to replace. Using Greenboard and tiling cost me $350.00 installed.
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85 Capri wrote:

Because using Ditra you can do a whole room in 3minutes and they have a cool web video to proove it http://www.schluter.co.uk/produkt_video.aspx?doc=6-1-ditra.xml&pg=uebersicht
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Thats a nice vid

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RayV wrote:

Damn that's fast! It would take me more than 3 minutes just to do the grout.
Best regards, :^)
Bob
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85 Capri wrote:

Assuming you're not a troll - with the amount of partial and disinformation in your post it's not clear one way or the other - I'll humor you with a few observations.
Cement backer board costs about three times as much as greenboard, so for a typical tub surround area the backer board would have cost roughly $80 more. Ditra is most commonly used on floors, not walls. Kerdi is used on walls. Either one would have cost a couple or three hundred bucks for your installation. Why are you multiplying by ten in your guesstimate?
Tiling on greenboard is for hacks. It's done all of the time. By hacks. If you wanted ease of installation, a waterproof barrier and added insulation on the walls, you could have used Wedi board which is a bit more than cement backer board but has the added benefits listed above.
There's no reason why you should spend money you don't want to. It's your house. I'm guessing from the $350 installed price you mentioned you did the work yourself and didn't include the value of your labor. If you hired someone to install it for that price, you hired a hack.
If you really wanted to save money you could have gone with a $100 vinyl tub surround. Viewed from that angle you wasted money.
Justifying your decisions by puffing up the numbers to support your choice is an art form best left to politicians.
R
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Ok.
I had a couple of companies come in and estimate taking old off and putting new on. The companies both said you must be a qualified installer to do the schluter system. Both came in around the $2000.00 to $3000.00 price range. Yes, I installed myself, so you calling me a Hack?. My labor to my own place is free labor, thats the whole point of saving the labor not hiring someone else.
So what is wrong with installing on Greenboard?
My work is proffesionall and will last well over 20yrs most definatly. so I would not call myself a Hack. The tile will need to redone in 5 -10 yrs.

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This can't be real, but tile on greenboard in a tub surround => hack.
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so tile on Greenboard = hack for a TUB surround?
Why?

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85 Capri wrote:

Maybe, if you'd relax, and listen to what people are trying to tell you, you'd "get it." Or RTFM and DAGS.
Greenboard is moisture _resistant_, a little more so than std sheetrock. Not suitable for regular wetting, as happens behind shower tiles.
Cement board can withstand regular wetting, though there really should be a moisture-barrier, too.
J
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85 Capri wrote:

The manufacturer of the product says not to use it in tub or shower surrounds.
The International Residential Code says not to use it in tub or shower surrounds.
That's why.
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85 Capri wrote:

I'm not here to hold anyone's hand, and I do apologize if I stepped on your toes. The time to be asking these questions is before you do the construction, not after. There is a boat load of knowledge on Usenet and it is _always_ a good idea to seek out advice before you start blazing away. Sometimes asking a couple of questions beforehand could save you money, labor or a law suit.
Moisture resistant wallboard (greenboard) is not intended for use in wet areas and is no longer approved by the International Residential Code for such applications. Gypsum is known to disintegrate over time with continuous moisture exposure and the paper facing on greenboard can serve as a food source for mold.
If your work is professional, you will use the correct materials in the correct way. I can understand your reticence to pay for what you consider an unnecessary expenditure, but doing a tile installation that is doomed to failure is not the way to go about "saving" money. Tile installations are as a rule not waterproof. You cannot rely on a bit of caulking and some grout to create a perfectly waterproof installation. If you need waterproof, you install a waterproof membrane.
By the time the signs of failure show up in your tile installation, far more damage will be hiding in your walls. If you're lucky the damage will just be to the wall board. If you're not the framing may be rotting.
Your labor is not free unless you don't value your time. Presumably there are other things that you could be doing that you enjoy. Putting in more time on your regular job would earn you more money than your labor on your bathroom would save you. Offsetting the value of your time is the sweat equity that you are accruing in your house. You're paying with your time now, you'll reap the rewards when you sell or refinance.
Why are you planning on redoing the tile job in five or ten years?
R
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Tile will be outdated.
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By the way, The (Shluter) system for tub surround costs at Home depot was $499.99 plus tax
Cement board was $150.00
The kirdi was optional and very recommended at $120.00
Thinset - $22.00 x 2 bags
approx- $1000.00 just for the schluter system + $250.00 for the tile and grout.

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wrote:

Damn, I like the way you express yourself.
Ken
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lol... Outdated tile in a tub surround? Hell, I have some 40 year old ceramic in my tub surround... off-white with green dots... Find curtains to match that. ;-)
Y'all wanna talk about hacks? I just painted the tile and tub (needed refinished and new tile) with oil-based gloss white (4 coats, no primer). The idea was to seal it for a while until I can afford to replace them, and to cover over that horribly disgustingly ancient pattern that was on the ceramic. The reality is, the tub looks and acts like new... the tile looks exceptional...as good a white ceramic with white grout.
Who knows, sometimes we hack something together to save a few bucks...and it ends up better than our wildest expectations..... or at least better than ugly tile from the 60's.
snipped-for-privacy@nospam.tnx wrote:

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