Baseboard questions

Hello,
I have some questions about the right way to install the baseboards at a couple places in my remodeling work. My house has flat 1x10s for the baseboards.
First, I have several outside corners in the new work, and I'm wondering if I should butt joint them or miter them. There are no outside corners in the old work to match, but all the the inside corners are butt jointed. Obviously with a profiled baseboard you have to miter the outside corners, but I was thinking with the flat stock I should butt joint them to match the inside corners. Is that right?
Second, in an alcove I have to deal with a floor height transition of about 1/8" and a metal transition strip. I was thinking that I should install the baseboard first and just run the transition strip between the baseboards. For the baseboard itself, I'm planning on just notching the part over the higher floor. Does this sound right?
Thanks, Wayne
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On Mon, 19 Jul 2004 17:24:50 GMT, Wayne Whitney

With outside corners you will see the end grain of one piece. This does not match the inside corners where end grain is hidden. IMHO it should be mitered.

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I agree with Alan. The OS corners need to be mitered because of the end grain. You may also need to trim them a bit for a tight fit. Suggest you use some scrap pieces to cut a test fit as wall and corners are seldom true.

You might be able to get away with just trimming the bottom for such a small rise or hide the difference with the shoe molding. I did one last year with a 5/8" difference in a doorway and it required a compound miter cut to allow for the angle of incline and to get a good tight miter. I really don't recall what I did now. I used a several feet of scrap pieces figuring it out. I do recall that is was like cutting crown, upside down and backwards.
Colbyt
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I though that shoe molding is only used when a finish floor is installed after baseboards. Is there any reason for it when the baseboard is installed after the finish floor?
Thanks, Wayne
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Colbyt wrote:

floor in all installs except carpet in all installations that I have seen. Reason: it is flexible and can be bent up or down as needed. Very few floors are truly level. The minor variation in the shoe is never noticed.
Colbyt
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If the gap is minor, is it reasonable to use painter's caulk for it? I understand this is OK for small gaps between the baseboard and the wall, when the wall finish is not perfectly straight.
Cheers, Wayne
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Colbyt wrote:

Sure! It is your house. If it were mine I would try to match the new to the old as close as possible. If the old has no shoe then install no shoe. Come to think of it; with 10" BB you may not have shoe. I would use the trim and siding caulk which is a little thicker and will shrink less and last longer than painter's grade.
Colbyt
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Indeed, this is the case, and this is what I plan to do. I was just looking for a reality check, thanks.
Cheers, Wayne
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Wayne Whitney wrote:

Yes.
Practically, to hide any gap between baseboard and floor. Floors are seldom truly level and you couldn't bend your 1x10. You could spile it though.
Esthetically, there are those that like the look of a shoe.
BTW, wood floors are never - or should not be, at least - installed after baseboards. The purpose of the baseboard is to hide the expansion area between floor and wall. Come to think of it I guess one *could* install floor after baseboard and hide expansion between floor and baseboard with a shoe. Poor form though.
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