Attaching cedar baseboard to drywall [problem]


Hello All,
I have a problem with some cedar baseboard. We got it straight from a mill. It took us 2 days to sand and tint 30 meters of it.
The problem is that the wood either came with or has developed a slight bend. The bends range in all directions and in almost all pieces (a couple are straight).
The main issue I have right now is that these are not going into concrete walls like the rest of my house they are going into drywall so I acquired a tube of a no nails type of glue. The problem is though that I can't force the baseboard into the correct position without securing it with something.
Here are some options i've thinking about:
- Nail some finishing nails to the bottom rail that runs on the floor (1/4" is used up by the floor though) and use the glue.
- Nail long steel nails through the drywall and into the concrete wall behind it (possible on 3 walls and all the stairs) ofcourse glue would be applied as well.
- Glue a section of the baseboard. Leave it for a couple hours and then come back and glue the next part, etc. This could potentially take an eternity.
Any other suggestions?
Thanks in advance, Nick
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Nick Aron wrote:

Concrete blocks to set on the floor, with a cardboard pad so you don't scuff the baseboard. Glue the board to wall, and shove blocks up against it until the glue sets. After you are done, use them in the garden for edging, or in the workshop to hold up shelves. Sounds like they didn't age the boards well enough before they milled them, or you didn't keep them dry enough after you got them. Don't be surprised if they pop back off, though- warped wood is stronger than the bond of the surface paper to the gypsum underneath it.
--
aem sends...

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Thanks for your reply. I wonder if there is another method? Maybe screws? Screw it into the drywall to hold in place?
I don't want the bricks to damage the floor (it's brand new)...
The most likely is that they didn't allow it to cure enough. We got it, sanded it and immediately put on sealer. The baseboards were certainly never in the rain once we had them.
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Rent or borrow an air nailier that shoots nail 1" longer than the combined thickness of the drywall and base. One or two nail every 16" into the stud and or sill plate will hold it forever.
No offense intended, I personally consider glue to amateur way of installing base and trim
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Nick Aron wrote:

Nails. Or screws. Into the same things the drywall is fastened to... the sole plate (at the bottom) and studs. If there is a slight gap at the top of the baseboard after nailing, caulk it and paint same color as wall. There most likely *will* be gaps because drywalls aren't straight due to the humps at joints.
You could use molly bolts - they go through the drywall and expand behind it - but it would be a horrendous and unnecessary task.
--

dadiOH
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I agree with DadiOH...The only thing I would add is the humps in the wall will be in more places than just the joints..Typical areas you could see a gap besides butt joints is both inside and outside corners..Of course if the framing isn't good all bets are off...There could be gaps everywhere...And I don't mean just the framing job itself , the framing stock itself isn't what it used to be..And not just big box lumber either..Even the small yards suck as they store it outside around here.....Framing can make doing all kinds of trim work an adventure , especially if it's not painted and it's done whith stain and/or poly....Including installing cabinets of any kind...HTH...
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benick wrote:

Amen to that.
I remember watching carpenters building a house back in the 30s when I was a kid...all hand saws and Douglas fir framing lumber that was knot free and straight as an arrow. They would have used the curenntly available junk only for fire wood to warm up on cold days.
--

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dadiOH wrote:

I agree...but what is not stated is the amount of variance from "straight". Sometimes it is the wall that is out of straight. Typical fix for gaps is to caulk and paint along top edge. The lumber could have been straightened by dampening the concave side and then clamping or weighting it until it dried. Might still work, but with sealer already applied I would have doubts. Angling nails slightly will help keep it from pulling away from the wall over time.
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Thanks everyone for your help.
Seems like everyone agrees i'm going to need to use screws or nails, I like the idea of screws better just because it will have more grab than a nail. Yes hitting the studs sounds like the best idea.
Nick
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Nick Aron wrote:

If you have trouble finding the studs tap in a nail above the level of the sole plate but below where the top of the baseboard until you find one; then locate both edges, mark the center and measure over 16" for the center of the next. That's assuming the studs are on 16" centers.
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You might consider back kerfing the baseboard to ease the fit to the wall. But that will add time to your project. Joe G
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Don't attempt to attach the baseboard *to* the drywall, rather, attach the drywall through the drywall to the wall behind it.
If the warpage is minor nails should work OK. If the warpage is major then you can either use screws, or perhaps make some partial cuts through the back of the wood to reduce its desire to bend.
Another option might be to shorten the baseboard and make more seams.
--

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Roger Shoaf

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Nick Aron wrote:

Here's the trick if the floor is not level:
* Cut the baseboard to the correct length and prop it up against the wall. * Open a school-compass to the widest gap seen and draw a line using the floor as the guide. * Cut - or sand - the bottom of the baseboard to match the line.
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HeyBub wrote:

Most easily done if the bottom of the baseboard is beveled up a bit toward the back, less to plane/cut/sand off.
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dadiOH
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