Asbestos Popcorn Removal Question

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Okay. I removed the popcorn acoustic ceilings in my home just 2 days ago after a friend told me how easy it was. Then last night I discover that the material probably contains asbestos so I took it into a testing center today and indeed it does. There's not much I can do now to reduce my own exposure since I'm pretty much done with the job, but what can I do to minimize my family's exposure to it?
Do I keep the spouse and kids out of the house for a couple of days? Do I need to turn on the A/C and change the filter a few times? What steps can I take? Right now I'm afraid to let anyone near the house.
Thanks.
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Last night, how did you discover that it probably contained asbestos?
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I'm not sure why this matters to answer my question, but I jumped online and Googled popcorn ceiling removal and found lots of websites that indicated that my house was the right age to likely have asbestos in the ceiling.
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I was just wondering why you checked this AFTER doing the work. Sometimes, I ask how old people are in these situations, but that doesn't go over well with most people for some reason.
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Generally, I place more value on friends who have done a job before and are standing next to me showing me how to do something than I do on Internet searches. Nothing wrong with the Internet, I just didn't see the need to look it up at the time. After he left and I had a question, I jumped online to get it answered. It's nearly impossible to find a web site detailing the removal procedure of popcorn without a bunch of disclaimers about the dangers of asbestos.
That's when I started to think, "hmmm... maybe my kids shouldn't be playing in this room for a day or two."
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Where is the asbestos going to go in a couple of days?
And then you vacuum and spray it into the air again. Only HEPA vacuums would prevent this.
Bob
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I would wash things down to remove the dust, you really dont want it sucked through the heating system
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*+-I would wash things down to remove the dust, you really dont want it *+-sucked through the heating system
This is the best advice posted here. I got the same advice from one of the leading asbestosis doctors around. Next time if you remove it, wet it first so it stays put. Chances are if you can't actually see it, the threat is not that great. But be especially careful of fabrics - the stuff tangles into fabrics and releases slowly. If it went on a rug, throw out the rug. Tell us more as to what you mean you removed them. From the whole house? Or only one room? Did you remove the sheetrock with the popcorn on it (prolly safer) or did you shave the popcorn off the sheetrock? (As to the brake wiseguy, I know another brake worker who died of mesothelioma.) However, the ceiling asbestos is probably "white" which is several orders of magnitude less hazardous than "blue" or "grey". (To put it in perspective, fiberglas is in turn several orders of magnitude less hazardous than "white", and sand is several orders of magnitude less hazardous than fiberglas.) Most plaster from 1920-1980 is like one third asbestos (it looks like shattered eggshell by now), even what you got if you broke your arm. The Vermont mines were a cheap source back then, and they used it everywhere (and do I mean everywhere). Before that they used straw or horsehair. The reason I'm telling you this, is you need to take things into an ambient perspective. I mean the guys who built the house probably spread some of it around, as well. I once read ages ago (like the 1950s?), they let small furry animals run around inside vent systems to clean them. If you can, get hold of a specialist. Try to get your contractor or insurance to help pay for them. You have to realise that every time you make a jerk pay for being a jerk, you not only get satisfaction, you're probably saving someone else's life. Approach your local NSPE.org or ASSE.org. They can measure how much airborne asbestos there is after the cleanup when you have the HVAC running. Still, you have to be agressive and like turn on all your appliances so the vibrations release the max that will be released. Try to understand what makes asbestos so bad - it's got the longest naturally occuring aspect ratio. It's hairy rock. Mesothelioma is to lung cancer what pleurisy is to pneumonia - the stuff pokes its way out to the OUTSIDE of your lungs, not just the inside.
                 - = - Vasos Panagiotopoulos, Columbia'81+, Reagan, Mozart, Pindus, BioStrategist      http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/vjp2/vasos.htm ---{Nothing herein constitutes advice. Everything fully disclaimed.}--- [Homeland Security means private firearms not lazy obstructive guards] [Urb sprawl confounds terror] [Remorse begets zeal] [Windows is for Bimbos]
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This is one of the best sites on the topic:
http://www.fiberquant.com/asbestos.htm
                 - = - Vasos Panagiotopoulos, Columbia'81+, Reagan, Mozart, Pindus, BioStrategist      http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/vjp2/vasos.htm ---{Nothing herein constitutes advice. Everything fully disclaimed.}--- [Homeland Security means private firearms not lazy obstructive guards] [Urb sprawl confounds terror] [Remorse begets zeal] [Windows is for Bimbos]
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Relax. Sweep it up, put it in a plastic bag, take it to the trash. It contains very little asbestos and it encapsulated in the paint. It is really not much of a hazard at all.
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Keep in mind you have to be exposed to asbestos dust DAILY for 20+ years before you MIGHT contract some symptom some 20 years after that. For a one time deal, forget it and go on. It's no different than the 8700 brake jobs I did in the 70's and 80's and blew everyone of them out with compressed air. I don't worry about that for sure.
--
Steve Barker


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Whattya mean, blew it out? You stood where in the room, and directed the compressed air where?
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I stood in front of the brake being serviced, and BLEW the air onto the old shoes and backing plate to clean the dust off. (same way I still do it for that matter)
--
Steve Barker



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That's a bit different from living in an enclosed space full of asbestos dust.
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Full of dust? From what? There shouldn't be any dust left if the OP wet the popcorn first, and even if he scraped it dry (the hard way), there shouldn't be much dust left.
They're not beagles who are running around with their noses to the floor.
Steve
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Call the state office or a licensed contractor that deals with asbestos abatement? No, you don't want to do that, I guess. Like the rest of the respondents, I say move on. Like a ninja! Tom
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Take a deep breath. Buy a vowel. Get a clue.
Unless your house was made prior to 1970, the chances of having asbestos in it are minimal.
If you wet the popcorn to take it off (and what moron wouldn't) you negated the possibility of it floating around in the air.
Read up on asbestosis (facts, ya know) and you will learn that it is inhaled.
Realize that even according to OSHA standards, you would have to remove a lot of asbestos in a lot of houses and do it DRY and make a big dusty mess many times before you would reach even the THRESHOLD levels.
If you are still paranoid, do this:
Open the doors and windows and blow fans for a couple of days. Vacuum with a vacuum that has a HEPA filter. Wear respirators or Scott packs while doing this.
Or just burn the place. Or sell it really cheap.
How much do you want?
Call your local mental health clinic and make an appointment.
You're a troll or a paranoid person.
Steve
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Up until your last few statements, you were helpful. I'm always amazed at how the anonymity of the Internet seems to cause ordinarily polite poeple to be rude. If I'm a troll, then why bother responding.
Assuming that you actually did mean to be helpful and not rude... I *have* read up on asbestos which is how I came to discover that I probably had it. My house was built in 1972. I attempted to wet the ceiling first, but due to the many times it has been painted, the paint kept the water from really doing its job.
Among some of the articles that I read on asbestos and its removal: http://realestate.msn.com/Improve/Article.aspx?cp-documentid '3335 http://www.airquality.utah.gov/HAPs/ASBESTOS/info/asbstrem.htm
I have zero experience with this sort of thing and have basically received my home improvement education (or lack thereof) from the Home & Garden Network. If you can put yourself in the shoes of an inexperienced do-it-yourselfer, you can probably see why the above articles gave me pause. I'm not a paranoid individual, but I imagine the above articles would put the fear of God into such an individual. I just don't want my young kids exposed to this any more than I want to see them gnawing on walls covered in lead paint.
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The "job" of the water is just this: To keep dust clinging to the stuff you remove, rather than the dust floating around the room.

If you're a new homeowner, here's a job for you: Open the yellow pages and look for hardware stores. Not Home Depot. Not Lowe's. Real, locally owned hardware stores. Type up a list of those stores, with addresses and phone numbers. Print 3 copies. One for your refrigerator, one for the glove box in the car, and one more in case you lose the others. Every time you need something for home repair, visit one of those stores, even if it's completely out of your way and you happen to be at a red light, staring at a nice, convenient Home Depot. When you find a hardware store whose people seem to know the answers to every problem you ask about, patronize that store forever so it stays in business.

Speaking of lead paint, if you find you have it, don't go nuts trying to remove it. If it's in good shape (adhering, not falling off), just paint over it to seal it. And, kids who eat paint chips are a sign of a very serious parenting problem.
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I understand that, but I'm not sure how well it worked since the popcorn wouldn't absorb the water. The water just bounced off of it like it was waterproofed. I'm guessing it's due to coat after coat of paint being applied to it over the years.

Not a bad suggestion, but I think you're too focused on the philosophy and not the specific problem. Rather than just address my questions, you're assuming that this is normal behavior for me when you don't know anything about me. I don't make a habit out of starting projects without research. In fact, I typically do so much research that I never start the project. This was a very unusual case where a buddy and I were talking about removing it and he said, "I've done it many times. How about we stop talking about it and just knock it out right now while I'm here." For a six pack of beer and an offer to watch the Superbowl on my 52" Plasma, I thought having him help me remove the ceiling was a pretty good deal.

No lead paint in my house that I know of. If there is, it has been painted over many many times.
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