Are ALL front loader washers junk?!!

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At least according to extraction theory, dividing a fixed amount of rinse water into more than one rinsing (aliquots) should be more effective, provided the volume of water in each doesn't get ridiculously small.

Does a bubble bath clean better than a regular one? And by "bubble", do you mean bubbles of air or other gas IN the water, or suds ON TOP OF the water?
Robert
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Douglas Johnson wrote:

We have two front load washers (one for us, one for our tenants). Ours is a roughly 9 years old Maytag Neptune, the other is a roughly 10-11 years old Frigidaire. So far we've had one repair for the Neptune to replace a blown fuse Other than that, they have been no trouble and are workhorses. We especially like the fact the clothes are half-way dry when we transfer them to the dryer. Clothes from a top loader tend to be wetter coming out of the washer and thus take longer to dry.
Our water bill covers both our and our tenant's water usage so it makes sense to do what we can to keep things under control. This was especially true 3 years ago when we had the clean-freak, extremely uptight* tenant from heck who washed 2-3 loads every day - more if she was especially anxious.
*How uptight? The first week she lived in the apartment, she complained about the noise of the acorns from our oak tree falling onto the lawn and demanded that we do something about it.
Chris
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Hi Chris,
I can sympathize. Years ago I had a basement tenant (a single girl) who would do one to two loads a day and for the life of me I could never understand how this would be possible.
My den was also directly above her kitchen and whenever she did the dishes she turned on the hot water full blast and left it running so that she could rinse them in the adjoining sink as she went (I knew it was hot water because within a minute or so you'd here a faint "woosh" as the gas water heater kicked on). I'd literally have to get up from my desk and leave the room because the sound drove me crazy. By the time I bought my next home I swore I'd never rent again.
Cheers, Paul
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obviously you have needed to service the stack unit. stacks are terrible when it comes to repairing
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oh bullshit
There was no reason whatsoever they couldn't have designed the unit where the seal and bearing could be replaced alone!
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snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

If you don't like the assembly price, you are certainly free to replace at component parts level, you'll just have to measure the bearings and whatnot and lookup the standard part numbers and get the parts from regular suppliers, not the appliance manufacturer. I've done this myself, and in some cases I've fabricated replacement parts that were not available separately and fixed the design flaws that caused them to fail while I was at it.
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Front loaders have been around for a long time in the commercial environment including Laundromats.
The early front loaders certainly had their problems. Some, but not all the later problems are much better. I suggest checking out Consumer's reports (they are far from perfect, but they are the best easily available information) for information on what is reliable.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
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Joseph Meehan wrote:

My daughter has an LG and loves it. Has had it for about a year. Exceedingly quiet ... it is on carpeted floor, main level of home, and you can't hear it outside of the room it is in. It will hold a ton of bluejeans at one time. Has steaming feature, which I doubt that I would use. For any washer, having it level goes a way in preventing problems.
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Here in Europe front loaders are the norm. I haven't seen a top loader in the ten years I've been here. We have a 10 year old machine from a Swiss maker called Zug. Runs about 10 loads a week (2 families on a farm with cows and a great dane, we make a lot of laundry). So far it hasn't needed any service at all.
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Will do
But should I look to commercial units only?
And......the real question is..... is a top loader "good" enough for me vs the premium of a front loader?
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On Mar 11, 2:29�pm, snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

compare top load vs front load washer price. how much more does front load cost?
how many loads a week do you do. water savings on those loads, plus add a little for dryer savings, since front loads spin out better... usually
now cost of water and sewage, around here its near 6 bucks a thousand. regular top load use 40 gallons front load say half that.
so a front loader saves at 2 loads a week 20 gallons of water and sewer saved per load 40 gallons a week, times 52 weeks a year = 2080 gallons of water. at 6 bucks per thousand thats just over 12 bucks a year in water and sewer savings, so say $15 and lets be generous and double that for drying energy saved so the total is 30 bucks a year, and lets assume hot water saved is equal to another 15 bucks now before anyone complains front loads are easier on clothes, so lets add the 15 buck savings for less clothes wear. at most if you are really lucky you might save 90 bucks a year........
but the front load costs at least twice as much so it might take you 5 years before any savings begin, and if you had invested the money somewhere else that diminishes the return on the front load
geez your savings is near zip in the lifetime of the unit, one breakdown and your out money.
I believe my savings estimates are on the generous side........... but your mileage may vary.
front loaders were designed by the marketing department for the expressed purpose of greater profits............
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High end top loaders have no agitator and have all the other advantages of a front loader, except that the opening is on top.
    Una
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You must be referring to the Calypso top loader which is pretty much a failed experiment on US consumers.
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Una wrote:

Never heard of it.
    Una
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On Tue, 11 Mar 2008 14:29:05 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

Do yourself a BIG favor and research Fisher & Paykel washing machines. You'll get over the misguided idea that front loaders are somehow superior.
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wrote:

all
available
You'll
Dont bother with F & P if you arent happy about having to by replacement parts as "assembles". I had one, the seal on the pump went, happens no big deal, easy 2 minute job to get the old pump out. To replace the seal you only need to unscrew the impeller and slip the seal off. But you cant buy the seal just a new pump ($60au about 10 years ago) Later on one of the PCB boards went, F & P had no idea which one so was going to replace the lot for $450+. Now have an Asko front loader so far its been great. As far as water goes the F & P used about 200l a load, the Asko about 30l. (the F & P used about 10l a load just to "change gear")
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Oh, you mean they sell parts the same way as virtually every other washer manufacturer in the world? The HORROR!

So, you had a bum technician who didn't know how to diagnose the problem. That isn't the fault of the machine.

Just wait until it needs a pump seal!
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wrote:

not
Consumer's
big
Oops i was talking to the OP, I didnt mean to imply that other makers were better or worse, just that if he wasnt happy buying assembles he better look else where.

for
That
He was a F & P tech from F & P in a F & P van, so while it might not be the machines fault, it is F & P's. The self diagnosis lite up with an invalid error code so he said the board needed replacing, but the boards only as a set.

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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

I DON'T believe FL washers are superior!
So what are you talking abt? That Fisher Paykel are superior? Confused
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On Tue, 11 Mar 2008 19:36:37 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net wrote:

I think Fisher & Paykel are just what you are looking for. A Top Load machine of moderate price with very advanced design and the same energy savings as a front loader, including a 1000rpm+ spin cycle so the dryer doesn't need to run as long. They also use any regular (much cheaper) detergent. They don't even have a transmission to go bad!
http://www.fisherpaykel.com /
I bought mine from a local "Mom & Pop" type appliance place. The owner's wife mentioned that she had one at home and loved it.
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