Aprilaire 600 humidity output

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wrote:

Don, you're using Agent 1.93, the same as I am. I was about to tell you to just turn on word wrap, with O.
But I looked at his op and found that it looked the same with wordwrap on or not. And its lines are only about 70 characters, though they all end with = except the last line in a paragraph.
So obviously one of Agent's other many parameters is set different for you and me. I don't want to go over ever singlee one of them, but if you have a couple suggestions, I'll check what my settings are.
You're right, when I reply to the OP and quote it, each paragraph is one line with one > in front of it. But it still only spans the width of my not new, not wide monitor. There is a scroll bar at the bottom, though nothing to the right to scroll to. Of course I'm in full-screen mode (for Agent and anything else that will go full screen.)
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On Saturday, November 22, 2014 5:42:43 PM UTC-5, micky wrote:

he wrong place. I recently (3 months ago) installed a new Trane 2 stage EC M furnace and along with it an Aprilaire 600 whole house Humidifier. It's upstate New York here, I've been setting the the thermostat to 73 degree, s o furnace officially started working since late September.

kes

On Saturday, November 22, 2014 5:42:43 PM UTC-5, micky wrote:

he wrong place. I recently (3 months ago) installed a new Trane 2 stage EC M furnace and along with it an Aprilaire 600 whole house Humidifier. It's upstate New York here, I've been setting the the thermostat to 73 degree, s o furnace officially started working since late September.

kes

I kind of get what carriage return means here now, I guess the paragraphs I typed all just went into one single line? I'm pressing enter at the end of every line I'm typing now, hope that will help! I'm just using google chrome on a desktop computer to read and post right now. Not sure if there is any app i'm using.
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On Sat, 22 Nov 2014 14:40:50 -0800 (PST), Hongyi Kang

At least for the sake of testing, you can raisse the humidity further by putting a big pot of water on the stove and boiling it until it's almost dry. (You can boil it dry for that matter without hurting most pots that much.) And/or you can stopper the bathtub, turn on the shower all hot, and just make sure you don't overflow the tub. (You could leave the tub unstopped, but that's a waste of hot water, and not as effective, because the water steams off of the surface as much as the spray.)
It's certainly worth doing this once, to see if it helps your wife. If it doesn't, then you can just stick with the humidifier as you have it.
The boiling water is better than the shower, I think. You can just keep adding more hot water to the boiling water, but you can only let the bathtub fill up so high, and I won't drain the tub until the water is room temperature.
Both of these, btw, are good ways of making the house feel warm, by raising the humidity, when the furnace is broken.

It's only too much if it bothers you for some reason. It would bother some of the people here, I think, or at least water on the windows would, but they don't have a wife with a sore throat. The only problem with the water is that it might damage the paint on the windows sills, but you might not have paint or even sills, and you have to repaiint painted ones once in a while anyhow.
They also worry about mold. I've had black mold for other reasons and it doesn't bother me, but I'm sure it does bother some people. I killed it either by removing the source of the wetness (a lot of water just outside) or with bleach, or with paint with mold suppressor added. (I thought killing it with bleach would make it turn white again, but that was silly.)

This had not bothered her like this before?
Maybe she was also sick with something that she doesn't have anymore. Or does have and should be treated for it.
So it made her feel worse than it normally will.

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On Saturday, November 22, 2014 6:17:26 PM UTC-5, micky wrote:

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bamboo slippers all the time, not sure how that's gonna affect static shoc k though. The 45% is actually the highest setting on this humidifier. I w ish I could crank it up any higher lol.


midity then?

e register but instead just judge by the water on window. This whole measur ing humidity thing actually started because my wife woke up on a morning ab out two weeks ago telling me her throat had been burning the whole night an d she had to drink water every hour to feel a little better.

t floor this afternoon and it read 36%. This number actually is consistent with the humidistat by the humidifier, because when I turned the humidista t to under 35%, it would stop the hot water feed to the humidifier. Maybe j ust like Stormin said, I might need two of these... Or maybe it's time to b leach clean my portable one again XD.
I will definitely try both the boiling water and the bathtub. And thanks for explaining the window water situation, I think we should be fine with water on the window then. My wife have had this coughing and sore throat problem for about 3 years, and it's mainly during winter that it's the worst. Before I moved into this house I used a portable humidifier to keep the humidity in bedroom high so that she feels better during the winter. That was a little problematic because I had to shut off the dry hot air reg ister in that room and keep the door half shut to keep the humidity to be around 50%. But the room got kinda cold which aggravated her throat as well. After we moved into this new house when I heard about this whole hous e humidifier you can imagine how happy I was. I thought I could keep the house warm and humid at the same time now :D. That's why I felt a little u pset when it started to not function as expected since the temperature drop .
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On 11/22/2014 6:33 PM, Hongyi Kang wrote:

Sounds like more humidity does good. The portable humidifier sounds like it worked for awhile.
But, it would be nice to get the real humidifier working properly.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Saturday, November 22, 2014 6:17:26 PM UTC-5, micky wrote:

It would bother

If you get significant condensation on the windows, what do you think is happening everywhere else that there is a similar cold spot, eg inside walls, near electric outlets, etc? Having humidity too high when it's cold isn't just a bother. It promotes mold, mildew, rot, etc.

There you go.
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On 11/22/2014 6:17 PM, micky wrote:

When I was a teen, I used to put hot water in a spray bottle and spray hot water mist into the air near the ceiling. It would evaporate on the way down. Quick and easy. Parents did not have a humidifier, so I pumped water into the air.
The pot on the stove is an old favorite of people who burn wood.
I agree, it's good for testing. See if she and you both feel better.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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wrote:

I can't look here right now.

I've seen User-Agent: G2/1.0 many times, for years, and I thought it was a regular application program.

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On Sat, 22 Nov 2014 14:58:19 -0800 (PST), Hongyi Kang

Yes, Enter is a carriage return (CR) It does help a lot, but you shouldn't have to do that. Still, Don knows more than I do about electronics, so he probably knows more than I here too.

I think it takes more than that. Are you at a particular website, like groups.google.com?

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I am indeed on groups.google.com
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On 11/22/2014 11:36 PM, Hongyi Kang wrote:

Worth noting, google groups is a portal to Usenet, which is a much older message system.
You are actually not talking (writing) with google people for the most part.
--
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Christopher A. Young
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To op If you want more humidity, did you try just turning the control upfull for a few days? I try to keep the house at 40% in the winter and it takes a lot of water to do that. And yes i get condensation on the cold glass, but that is normal, if you have humidity and cold glass, you will have condensation.
You might try a warm mist vaporizer in the bed rom. Make sure it is a warm mist type that actually heats the water, not the spinning disc type that slings the water and not an ultrasonic type.
Unfortunatly the warm mist type need a lot of maintenance but that is just The nature of evaporating water that contains minerals.
Get a digital humidity meter off ebay for a few bucks.
Also re google, with all the smart people they claim to have, you would think they would get the Cr thing roght. Maybe they are not as smart as they think. The zoom feature also does not work right When viweing google groups on an ipad.
Mark
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On Sunday, November 23, 2014 10:07:48 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Thanks Mark! I think my thing right now is, I don't think the humidifier is putting more humidity into the rooms when the furnace is on. I actually think it's drier when the hot air is coming out of the registers. This really bothers the hell out of me because I don't know whether I should trust my feelings, but the humidistat kinda agrees with me.
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On 11/23/2014 3:20 PM, Hongyi Kang wrote:

I'd rely more on the wife being comfortable. I don't care as much what a gauge says, it's people comfort that is important.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Sunday, November 23, 2014 3:46:21 PM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Agree, last night and today had been warm, and the humidity in the house increased to ~47%. My wife said she felt better. I tried both the boiling and filling up bath tub methods last night :D, was a lot of fun lol.
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On Sunday, November 23, 2014 8:16:23 AM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Oh that's really good to know! Thanks!
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On Sat, 22 Nov 2014 16:03:22 -0800 (PST), trader_4

Why would there be cold spots in the interior walls? Or the exterior wall inside the insulation.

AFA wwater near electric outlets, what's that going to do. Trip a breaker at most.
I have an extension cord I use with my electric lawn mower. I've left it outside for 10 years, day and night, 365 days a year lying in the rain and under the snow. It's never tripped the breaker, and it's a ground fault breaker that knows how to trip.

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On Saturday, November 22, 2014 11:28:42 PM UTC-5, micky wrote:

Because insulation isn't put in perfectly, even in new houses. And then you have areas where there is no insulation, or minimal insulation, eg where there is an electrical outlet box, recessed lights, a pipe going through a wall, etc. In old homes, who knows what you have. There are bound to be cold spots, and if excess humidity is condensing on the windows, it's bound to be condensing elsewhere, where you can't see it. Like maybe in the attic, because vapor barriers aren't perfect either and an old home may not even have one. Every credible building authority that I've seen talk about humidity, warns that excess humidity can cause damage and that you should not go above about 45%, lower as it gets colder outside. If you want water stains, peeling paint, rotting wood, that's up to you, crank it up to 75%+

Fine, have water dripping out of your outlets if you want.

Another sound practice. Who could argue with that?
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On Sun, 23 Nov 2014 12:55:26 -0800 (PST), Hongyi Kang

On second thought, the bathtub is pretty risky. If you do it often enough, eventually you'll forget and water will overflow who knows how long, hours?
BTW, the overflow drain in tubs (and sinks too I think) doesn't drain nearly fast enough to make up for a running faucet.
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On Sunday, November 23, 2014 9:34:10 PM UTC-5, micky wrote:

lol yeah, I figured I probably shouldn't do it every night :D
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