...And that's why I keep SharkBite End Caps in the shop

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A long time ago I needed to cap a pipe, so I decided to try a SharkBite End Cap just to see what they were like. It worked so well that I said to myself, "Self, maybe you should toss a couple of End Caps in the plumbing drawer just in case you need to cap a pipe in an emergency."
So, here it is, 9 PM on a Friday night and I walked down into the basement to find that the pipe from the water heater has developed a pin hole leak.
So, off with the main, a couple of quick cuts to remove the bad section, push on 2 caps and back on with the main.
No showers tomorrow morning, but at least we have water tonight. Tomorrow, I can take my time replacing the bad section.
...and that's why I keep SharkBite End Caps in the shop.
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On Fri, 18 Mar 2016 18:34:12 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

What do you think caused the pinhole leak?
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On Friday, March 18, 2016 at 11:47:44 PM UTC-4, Vic Smith wrote:

I don't know. The pinhole was on a short (4") section of pipe between a T and a 90. I cut the pipe exactly at the pin hole, leaving about 1" sticking out the T. (That left me enough room to put the cap on. I'll need to replace the T and the 90 tomorrow)
Anyway, after I cut the pipe I noticed that the pin hole had begun to turn into a slit, I assume from the pressure of the cutter. That tells me the leak was about to get much bigger.
As I said, I cut the pipe exactly at the pin hole and this is what I found inside the pipe right at the cut. (Ignore the outside of the pipe. I had cleaned the outside before cutting it.)
http://tinyurl.com/CutPipe
Full Link:
http://i440.photobucket.com/albums/qq121/DerbyDad03/20160319_001145_zpsl6dtvfep.jpg
I can't tell if the "scale" that you see is buildup or what's left behind from disintegrating copper. It extends down about 1/2" but it is all around the inside of the pipe at the cut, not just on the side where the hole was.
I have a plumbing supply house that I like, so I may take the piece over there and have them tell me what's going on. In any case, the rest of that short piece of pipe will be gone first thing in the morning.
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On Fri, 18 Mar 2016 21:30:16 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Let us know what they say. I'm curious. I'll be repiping my galvanized soon with copper. Because I don't have my threading tools anymore, copper pipe is cheaper, and it might make a difference in the house's resale value. The piping is 58 years old. No leaks, but the flow is getting restricted enough that it's time to do it.
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On Saturday, March 19, 2016 at 12:58:44 AM UTC-4, Vic Smith wrote:

save yourself tons of work and gobs of money and use PEX!
its cheap, works awesome, no one will steal it, it never corrodes.
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wrote:

Code here is galvanized or copper. PEX not allowed.
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are you certain that still code? PEX is actually less likely to leak since it can all be home runs from a manifold to fixture. no fittings buried in walls etc
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wrote:

Yes, I've checked. http://forms.mortongroveil.org/code/
890 appendix A, table A. Delete "Approved Building Drainage/Vent Pipe", "Approved Materials For Building Sewer", "Approved Material For Water Service Pipe", and "Approved Materials For Water Distribution Pipe" and replace with:
Approved Materials For Water Service Pipe Material Standard Ductile iron water pipe AWWA C151; AWWA C115 Copper or copper alloy pipe ASTM B42; ASTM B302 Copper or copper alloy tubing (type K only) ASTM B75; ASTM B88; ASTM B251 Approved Materials For Water Distribution Pipe Material Standard Copper or copper alloy pipe ASTM B42; ASTM B30 Copper or copper alloy tubing (type K or L) ASTM B75; ASTM B88; ASTM B251 Galvanized steel pipe ASTM A53
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On 03/20/2016 03:12 AM, Vic Smith wrote:

Does union influence have anything to do with Morton Grove plumbing code?
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wrote:

It's probably the trades in general that run the show. Plenty of non-union plumbers and electricians here. Chicago code is common in the counties around Chicago.
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On 3/19/2016 7:24 AM, bob haller wrote:

Said it better than I could have. I did hear of someone in the city who had his copper pipes stolen out of the house one night.
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On Fri, 18 Mar 2016 23:58:45 -0500, Vic Smith

I'd also consider PEX. Easy to work with. Personally, I'd not buy a house with galvanized that was slowing down so it is a good thing to replace it if you are eventually selling.
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On Saturday, March 19, 2016 at 12:58:44 AM UTC-4, Vic Smith wrote:

I finished sweating in the new section. I noticed that when I tried to use the same type fittings as the originals - a T and a 90, the horizontal pipe from the WH would not line up with the 90.
One of the issues (I think) is that the pipe that goes to the upstairs bathroom from the top of the T is not a straight run. They apparently used a bender to put some curves in the pipe. Therefore the pipe coming out of the bottom of the T was not at a right angle to horizontal pipe to the water heater, even though they had used a 90 to connect those 2 pipes.
In the image linked to below, you can see the curve in the pipe as it comes through the sub floor.
I think the original installation was under tension, although things didn't really "spring" when I cut out the leaking section last night. I wonder if the tension had relaxed because the original 4" section that came out of the bottom of the T had weakened over time and eventually failed. Just a guess.
What I was able to do was use two 45's instead of a single 90. You can see one coming out of the bottom of the T and another about 3" down. I also put 1/4" spacers between the bottom of the joists and the horizontal pipe that comes out of the middle of the T. This set up allowed everything to go back together in a "relaxed" manner.
The new section starts with the T and ends with the repair coupling near the electrical wire. The leak was in that short pipe between the two 45's. Originally that pipe had a 90 at the bottom and went directly into the bottom of the T.
http://tinyurl.com/NotLeakingYet
Full Link:
http://i440.photobucket.com/albums/qq121/DerbyDad03/20160319_150722_zpsicmvmj9x.jpg
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On 3/19/2016 2:40 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

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Vic Smith posted for all of us...

Have you thought about PEX?
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On Monday, March 21, 2016 at 3:56:04 PM UTC-4, Tekkie® wrote:

Have you thought about reading the thread before responding?
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On Mon, 21 Mar 2016 13:01:58 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

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On Mon, 21 Mar 2016 13:01:58 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

PEX is for people who are too lazy to do REAL Plumbing. It's about the same as running a garden hose to your sink, toilet, or whatever else. It may seem durable and strong, but for how long? It's plastic, and like all plastics, it has a limited life span. Some day in the future you'll come home and find your house flooded because this plastic crap broke.
REAL PLUMBING is made from metal, and is a PIPE, not a HOSE!
But we live in a day and age when people worship plastics and dont want to do any REAL work, or pay for REAL plumbing.
Pex is fine for a temporary means to get water from point A to point B, but it's NOT a permanent plumbing. I might consider it for an outdoor sprinkler system. but not for "piping" in my home.
--

As far as the original topic of this thread, I recall reading somewhere
in this (long) thread that there was stress on these copper pipes due to
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On 3/21/2016 5:50 PM, snipped-for-privacy@unlisted.moo wrote:

Oh man, that is funny. The start of this thread was about a copper tube leaking. Yeah, metal pipe is perfect! PEX has been in use for about 60 years now.
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Any pipe can develop a leak, and the copper was a pin hole, not a gushing fully broken pipe. If a PEX connector comes apart, it will result in a flood, not a small puddle.
PEX may have been developed 60 years ago, but it was not allowed in America until recently, and is still not allowed by code in some parts of the country, and for GOOD REASON! I dont know if it's allowed in my part of the country, and I really dont care, but if I had any say in local codes, I would vote against it. (But I dont have any say). No matter how you look at it, it's a HOSE, not REAL PLUMBING!
I do know it will never be used in any home I live in!
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