Aluminum threshold on cement floor

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On 12/26/2013 4:26 PM, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

My plan was to run the drill in, leave it in, and blow while the drill is keeping the hole plugged.
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Christopher A. Young
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

I haven't read all of the other replies yet, so maybe someone already mentioned this....
But, have you considered just gluing the threshold down using this?: http://www.loctiteproducts.com/p/pg_ca_all_p_clr/overview/Loctite-Power-Grab-All-Purpose-Clear-Construction-Adhesive-Cartridge.htm .
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On 12/26/2013 6:42 PM, TomR wrote:

New one, thanks. It's cold and snowing, here. I don't know what the temp range. New technology. Tapcons, well, they are something the store can see and understand.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

I don't know about the cold temperature part, but I have used Loctite PowerGrab to glue down thresholds to concrete and it worked well.
I have also used Tapcons a couple of times to try to attach things to concrete, not including thresholds, but including securing interior 2x4 walls to a concrete floor with pre-drilled holes in the concrete. One thing that I found was that if I got a little too hasty using a screw gun to put them in, they "over-drilled"(?) and the Tapcons just destroyed the concrete like a drill and they wouldn't hold. So, I partially screwed them in with a screw gun and then hand-tightened the final part. And, even with Tapcons, maybe a little glue in the pre-drilled holes (such as the Loctite stuff) would help secure the Tapcons in place.
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A threshold is a strip across the bottom of a door opening that seals it wh en the door is closed, so cold (or hot) air does not seep in under the door . A threshold can be wood, metal or vinyl, but a popular option is aluminum , which is resistant to rot or water damage, cleans easily and requires no regular maintenance. Many aluminum thresholds have rubber strips that flex when the door is closed to provide a tighter seal. Replacing a threshold wi th a new aluminum one is fairly simple.Measure the bottom of the doorway wi th a tape measure and buy an aluminum threshold to fit; most entry doors ar e about 36 inches wide. Match height of the new threshold to the old; make sure the new threshold is no higher off the floor to avoid door closing pro blems. Use a rubber-centered threshold if the old one had such a piece. For more information http://www.buyliquidroof.com/liquid-coatings.html
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On 1/24/2014 8:23 AM, Alan Smith wrote:

The most durable seal especially for commercial doors where there is a lot of traffic, is a solid flat threshold and the seal on the bottom of the door. A brush strip seal on both sides works very well. ^_^
TDD
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