Air conditioner outlet is 220 v; how can i run a 110v line off this?

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So obviously not identical. Also they don't flow at the same time, but during alternate half-cycles. Both go through both breakers.

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I am pretty sure someone doesn't know basic electricity. Sorry to inform you that you're it.
If you have 10A on one side of a double pole breaker and 10A on the other. It's the same 10A
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Sorry to say you are wrong Ted. There is only one amp of current flowing in the circuit when you remove the neutral. Easy way to prove this is that if we follow your reasoning is that you now have 2 amps and 240 volts which is 480 watts. What is using the extra wattage ? There is only one amp flowing and that is one amp at 220 volts which is the 240 watts of the lights you have.
YOu have a series circuit and there is only one amp flowing, not two.
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No you idiot; 1a at 120v on two circuits. 120w on each. Where did the 220 volts come from. You are horribly confused.
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On Mon, 9 Jun 2008 15:06:17 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

How you know a 110 ac is going to e big enough? It isn't August yet. If you're just trying to be cheap on buying an ac, you might want to rethink it. If your outlet has three holes, forget it, there is no safe way to adapt. If you have four, you could build something with the proper plug, maybe a dryer corrd set or something going into a box with a 110 outlet wired to one hot, neutral and ground.
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wrote:

In over 35 years in the electrical business, I've never seen an airconditioner outlet with four holes, and I've certainly never installed one. Only in Hallerb's fantasies are neutrals required to be run, despite the fact that there is no place to attach them

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On Jun 9, 8:06pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Simplest answer is: Ignore the 220 volt outlet. A 110 volt AC (with lower BTU output) will use less power so run an extension cord of reasonable gauge (not one of those teensy weensy Christmas tree light extensions with wires as thin as cotton thread) to a suitable outlet. And plug in your 110 volt air conditioner to that. You may have to make sure there is nothing else 'heavy' on that same circuit as the outlet you plug into; so get a long enough extension cord to pick an outlet on another circuit if necessary. Irritating if you have, say, a coffee-maker on and the AC cuts in and pops the breaker!
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terry wrote: ...

"Simple" maybe; "appropriate", no.... :(
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wrote:

Simplest answer is: Ignore the 220 volt outlet. A 110 volt AC (with lower BTU output) will use less power so run an extension cord of reasonable gauge (not one of those teensy weensy Christmas tree light extensions with wires as thin as cotton thread) to a suitable outlet. ---------------------------- Thats the worst advice I have heard in a while. Unless he as a 600w A/C you are looking at a house fire.
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Oh, sure, just what someone wants..a shitty 12 ft extension cord running along their floor from an outlet to the A/C unit cord "dangling" down the wall to the floor.. Or maybe they should "tack" it to the wall about 3 ft "up" R

Simplest answer is: Ignore the 220 volt outlet. A 110 volt AC (with lower BTU output) will use less power so run an extension cord of reasonable gauge (not one of those teensy weensy Christmas tree light extensions with wires as thin as cotton thread) to a suitable outlet and plug in your 110 volt air conditioner to that.
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wrote:

Getting back to basics and the original poster's topic for a moment -
220V appliances are designed for 220V outlets and 220V circuits.
110V appliances are designed for 110V outlets and 110V circuits.
Any attempt to jerry-rig or circumvent this is generally a bad idea.
If you don't own the property, you shouldn't mess with the wiring.
In your case, at some time, someone decided a 220V. outlet was needed for an air-conditioner. Be thankful you have it and don't have to pay the expense of installing a new electric line yourself. It's going to be more cost-effective in this case to use a 220V. air conditioner. They are generally larger, and (perhaps) more efficient.
If you don't need all that cooling power, you can always turn it to the low setting.
Extension cords for air conditioners are generally a bad idea. Most people don't want to spend the money to get the one that is the size that they really need.
However, if you use one, make sure it is a special heavy-duty cord marked for that purpose. They are usually very short and used to reach a plug that is just out of reach.
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You are renting. You have no rights to do anything.
Contact your landlord and ask them.
Colbyt
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