Advice for moss and algae on asphalt roof shingles

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On Nov 26, 6:56pm, snipped-for-privacy@worthless.info wrote:

Is new roof the same color and texture, I could understand a more agressive texture or style holding tree debris instead of alowing it to wash off since oaks drop sticky sap in early summer, a different color would not heat up the same as the old roof from the sun affecting what lives. I would not scrub the roof. Zinc strips at the peak might help. Contact the roof co, bleach and other "moss" treatments will kill mold and moss but will it ruin the roofs life expectancy? Your store bought moss treatments probably have Sodium Hypochlorate as the main ingrediant, thats just Laundry bleach for 10x the price. Contact GAF.
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ransley wrote:

Some roofing material has things added to stop moss growth. Other doesn't.
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bobm3 wrote:

Considering it recently started on the siding along with the relatively new shingles, I'd say the new shingles has little or nothing to do with the problem.
As your trees grow, the shade becomes denser, which promotes moss, fungus and algae. Temperature, moisture and humidity are also factors. Perhaps this years weather promoted growth more than average.

Over time, plenty. You don't want to let this go unsolved.

There are a variety of chemical treatments, plus the metal strip method.
Trim the trees back so the roof gets more sun.

Maybe. Did they give you an ironclad guarantee against all moss, fungus, algae and mildew growth? If not, I suspect that you're on your own.

I had the same problem on my roof this year, in a shady spot that sounds similar to yours. I had both moss and fungus well established on the roof.
I considered a bleach solution, but I was worried about the affect it might have on the asphalt fiberglass shingles on my roof.
I checked all the products at Lowes, and all I found was siding and deck wash products did not mention use on roofs.
So I took a chance, and sprayed a weed killer on it one afternoon when heavy rain was forecast for that night. It looks to have killed about 90% of it. But since I don't know what that might have done to shorten the life of the shingles, I don't recommend doing what I did.
--
Tony Sivori
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I thought you were concerned with Eco-Friendly products? Or is it just a concern when others use them?
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Wow! Thanks everyone for quite of bit of education. I am going to try the product mentioned first and next spring try the zinc plates for an ongoing effect.
Thanks again all - this was great!
Bob
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On Fri, 27 Nov 2009 22:26:55 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@mucks.net wrote:

If by "weedkiller" he meant Roundup, then it was quite eco-friendly. The stuff is approved for use on food crops.
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tnom wrote: [attributes restored]

I don't know where you got that idea, given that I've never posted my position on that topic.
So many companies greenwash their product that the "green" or "Environmentally friendly" tags have become meaningless advertising fodder.
That said, I am substantially more concerned about environmental issues than many of my peers and acquaintances.
There are things that were commonplace in the old days (say, 35 years ago) that I would not consider doing today. A few examples: dumping used motor oil into soil as fence line weed killer. Gasoline as parts wash, then dumped on the fence line as weed killer. Venting freon to the atmosphere, both to repeatedly refill leaking systems and for actual repair.
As far as necessary use of chemicals (and other goods), I want products that work. If there are choices that are truly better for the biosphere, and the purchase cost different is not too great, I will go with the "bio friendly" option.
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Tony Sivori wrote:

Careful, a reasonable opinion like that could get you kicked out of here.
-- aem sends....
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On Thu, 26 Nov 2009 19:56:15 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@worthless.info wrote:

I used the product "Shingle Shield" which are zinc strips installed near the roof peak, that was nearly 20 years ago. Today there are shingles made that release metal ions. For existing conditions you might try a moss/algae killer product (hardware store, HD, Lowes). Increase the sunlight and airflow to your roof (remove a tree or two?). Increase your roof's pH. Decrease moisture--Check drains/gutters. Your trees are probably giving you a lot more shade than 5 years ago.
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