Advice for converting Sears Craftsman 220V compressor plug to washing machine plug

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FatterDumber& Happier Moe" <"WheresMyCheck wrote:

I've had a compressor for over a decade, but I've only had air tools (impact and ratchet, also nail and brad guns) for a couple of years. Makes working on the car _so_ much easier, I can't believe it took me so long to get them!
Jon
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That's likely why the repair garages use them.
--
Christopher A. Young
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 06:06:44 +0000 (UTC), Elmo wrote:

Here's the summary after reading all the posts, especially djb's (Dave Bot..o perhaps?) posts.
1. The BEST approach is, all agree, to replace the NEMA 10-30R dedicated dryer receptacle and 30 amp breaker with a NEMA 6-20R and a 20 amp breaker.
2. However, the use of a well-made adapter will be just as safe and "compliant" to code, for temporary use (e.g., once every few months for a few minutes).
3. The two 120V hot wires match up one-to-one; what doesn't match (at first) are the two inconsistencies (a) amperage, and (b) ground/neutral
4. Taking amperage first, the 30 amp circuit is protecting the house wiring, not the load. The 15 amp load will not cause a safety hazard to the house wiring. The load has its own overcurrent protection on the motor.
5. Taking the contentious ground/neutral situation next, djb summed it up best by clarifying the W wire in the grandfathered NEMA 10-30R receptacle is a ground for the 240 volts of the compressor. So it's a one-to-one match of the NEMA 6-20P plug ground to the NEMA 10-30R receptacle ground (via the adapter cord).
6. If we were to plug in a non-existent dryer, then (and only then), would the NEMA 10-30R receptacle ground wire be also carrying dual duty as the 110 volt neutral (for the dryer 110V circuitry).
In summary, it appears, as long as my adapter is well made (picture of it below), it's safe (even safer than plugging in a dryer) to plug in the cord that I made.
A picture of the adapter cord and compressor is here:
http://img534.imageshack.us/i/006ary.jpg/
http://img153.imageshack.us/i/005tqn.jpg/
http://img714.imageshack.us/i/004wtt.jpg/
http://img525.imageshack.us/i/003zpn.jpg/
http://img809.imageshack.us/i/007pet.jpg/
http://img828.imageshack.us/i/002nd.jpg/
http://img265.imageshack.us/i/001aaz.jpg/
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On Jul 25, 1:06 pm, Elmo <dcdraftwo...@Use-Author-Supplied- Address.invalid> wrote:

That is seriously the STUPIDEST thing I have ever seen made out of electrical components...
You don't know how to put a cord end on a cord ?
Also, you could CUT the pre-made ring terminations off of the dryer cord you purchased and used wire nuts to make pigtails that would have fit the screw terminals on the side of that outlet you are using...
Just because you have made something that provides power doesn't mean you have done so properly or safely... ~~ Evan
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 16:25:57 -0700 (PDT), Evan wrote:

Hi Evan, Thanks for the advice after looking at the pictures of the adapter.
You're the only one to comment on the pictures of the adapter.
The ring terminals caused no problem; and certainly the way I did it is as safe as any other method ... but you mention the strain relief???
Do you have a picture of how it should be done if the way I did it is either improper or unsafe?
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 06:06:44 +0000 (UTC), Elmo

The only thing I can say is what has already been said. If you have to ask these questions you should not be doing this job. This is something left for the professionals.
Consider what could happen to your family if you assume wrong...
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wrote:

The compressor won't work, and they'll run out of air?
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That's one possibility I hadn't thought of. Another possibility is the compressor will suck. That's the logical possibility. After all, it is a Craftsman compressor...
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wrote:

Yea, but it's on old Craftsman, from when the sucked less
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wrote:

You'll shoot yer eye out, kid?
Three wires is pretty hard to screw up. The only thing is that the dryer/range plug will have too big a breaker, and if the compressor overheats, it won't pop off in time to save it.
Steve
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 12:10:26 -0700, "Steve B"

That is why these motors have built in overload protection. The breaker can be 250% of the FLA of the motor. (430.52)
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 12:29:18 -0500, Gordon Shumway

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On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 15:05:31 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Maybe. I don't know about you but I hope I never live next to someone that thinks they know how to work with electricity only to find out they know how to burn their house down.
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I wouldn't want to plug a two phase compressor into a single phase socket.
--
Christopher A. Young
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 15:45:35 -0400, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I read everything stated in all the helpful posts, and I only have two things that I'm not sure of at this point, neither of which were questions initially.
1. The 30-year old Craftsman compressor (model 919.176940, nameplate says 240 volts, 15 amps) certainly uses two hot wires ... but since it's using the third (green on the compressor, white on the adapter) wire as a ground, I guess it's really not TWO phase but really one phase.
Is it in actuality just a one phase two hundred volt motor?
2. Since the garage dryer receptacle is just on the other side of the main panel, I assume it's connected to the main panel; but I need to check. What I'll do, before plugging in the compressor, is stick a DMM into it and then hit the breakers.
Is there any other way to tell that you're NOT on a sub panel?
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It is a single phase 240 volt motor

For your purposes, it doesn't matter if it's connected to a sub panel
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2010 18:31:35 -0400, RBM wrote:

Well, after reading everything, I put it all together and plugged it in and tested it and it worked just fine.
I finally have a convenient way to plug in the old compressor.
Thanks for all your help!
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First question - do you know you even HAVE a sub-panel?????? If you don't have one it's pretty obvious it's not connected to one.
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On Mon, 26 Jul 2010 22:34:40 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I tested it on the main panel and the power to the 240 volt receptacle switched off when I hit one of the breakers on the main panel.
Yes, I have multiple sub panels. The house has had multiple additions by previous owners. In fact, the actual dryer is in one of those additions, so, I suspect (I didn't check) that it's on a sub panel.
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Most compressors are single phase.
As to being on a sub panel, only way I know would be to trace the wires, and look for one. Does your house even have a sub panel?
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Christopher A. Young
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