Adding Utility Tub Next to Washer/Dryer


I want to add a utility tub next to the washer in the laundry room. The room is on the first floor with basement access. The washer is connected to a utility box that supplies hot/cold water and drain. The utility tub will use a regular kitchen faucet and will be mounted in an enclosed cabinet. Of the options available, what is code required and the easiest to install.
For the new water connections, these are my options: 1. Use Y connectors in the existing utility box and run stainless hoses to the faucet. 2. Tap into the copper pipes in the stud cavity (2x4 studs) of the utility box and solder new pipes to the adjoining stud cavity. This may present problems since the there may not be enough room to allow the one of the new pipes to get around the PVC drain pipe. 3. Tap into the existing copper pipes in the stud cavity and run it outside the drywall. 4. Tap into the existing copper pipes in the basement. This is doable but there are things in the way that makes this choice a lot harder.
For the PVC drain pipe there are similar options: 1. In the stud cavity add a T fitting either above or below the J trap to the adjoining stud cavity. Again I am not sure there will be enough room to get around the copper pipe that is in the way. Will there also be a problem with drain water from the washer being pushed into the utility tub? 2. Add T fitting and extend it outside of drywall. 3. From the basement add a T fitting that will come underneath to the adjoining stud cavity.
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You might be able to do a neater system by scrapping the copper and putting a manifold in the basement with PEX tubing. That could leave more room for the drainage system, too. PEX gets around obstacles much easier than rigid piping. And with proper venting, the washer discharge should not burp out the tub drain. Your local building code people should be a good source of info on what is legal and works, too.
Joe
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wrote:

Don't be shocked if they want you to change the receptacle your washing machine is plugged into to a GFCI. It is the code now. (since 2005)
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On Oct 9, 10:51 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

...and this has...what to do with plumbing?
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wrote:

Tap off existing copper lines with copper and terminate with the required shut off valves for each cold and hot line. Make sure the hot is positioned on the left. Check for leaks. More expensive (but faster) use Sharkbite connections, if you don't have good solder skills.

Tap off the stack using 2" PVC. The shorter the distance, the better. If it is greater than a few feet you may need a revent loop. Your laundry/utility tub will have its own trap to prevent backflow. Make sure you have at least a 1/4" drop per foot for all drain lines.
The job will look much more professional if your pipes are located inside the wall. There should be an accessable cleanout plug on the stack, if not add one.
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