50A 240V GFI Circuit Breaker Tripping with nothing connected to it

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On Thu, 28 May 2015 20:52:07 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

He said he disconnected the wires.....
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On Thu, 28 May 2015 20:40:06 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

If he removed the load wires right at the GFCI breaker, it pretty well eliminates wiring issues. If he just disconnected the pump, there are still wires involved. Not always accurately described.
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On Thursday, May 28, 2015 at 10:16:04 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

More often not accurately read by some folks....
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On 5/28/2015 7:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I removed the wires at the breaker. The breaker still tripped instantly. And prior to that, the breaker would not trip and the circuit was still open so clearly it's at least part of the problem.
It's only about 15" of wire from the breaker to the timer and another 3' down to the pump so it's easy to replace all that wire if moisture is the issue.
I'll know tonight. The breaker is on the UPS truck for delivery.
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On Thu, 28 May 2015 20:52:07 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

He said he disconnected the wires.....
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On 5/28/2015 5:52 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
<snip?

No wires are connected to it on the load side.
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I don't know your exact situation, but you may not need the 50 amp breaker to be a GFCI. You can put in a regular breaker and change the load breakers to GFCI or change the outlet(s) to GFCI.
It's possible that the insulation on the wire is breaking down and moisture is causing a ground fault. My guess though is a bad GFCI breaker.
John Grabowski http://www.MrElectrician.TV
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And we have a winner!
--
Bobby G.




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John G posted for all of us...

+1 He is the real answer.
--
Tekkie *Please post a follow-up*

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On Tuesday, June 2, 2015 at 3:06:18 PM UTC-4, Tekkie® wrote:


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ker to be a GFCI. You can put in a regular breaker and change the load bre akers to GFCI or change the outlet(s) to GFCI.

ture is causing a ground fault. My guess though is a bad GFCI breaker.

IDK what all that breaker powers, but since it's for a pool sub panel and it's 50A, it sounds like it's probably a main breaker in the subpanel. If so, it would provide the GFCI protection for everything at the pool. Without it, he'd need a GFCI breaker for the pump, a GFCI breaker for lights, a GFCI breaker or GFCI receptacles, etc. One versus two or more...
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As far as I know, the actual disconnecting of the power inside a gfci is do ne by an old-fashioned relay. The semiconductors are use to sense an imbal ance between the two wire circuits/conductors that go thru the gfci, and th en to cause a relay to open the circuit if the unbalance exceeds a certain limit.
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