500 microns? - then you are a HACK!!

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DUH!
(I missed that)
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PrecisionMachinisT writes:

No, not without heat added.
No, not when the water is hydrating another substance.
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Dont be a fuckwit.
_Pressure_= heat.....

And so now pray tell just what the hell is this mysterious 'substance' youve added ( to the case in point)
Hmmm.......
Given a vacuum with some small amount of frozen water in it........will it ( eventually ) sublime or no ???
--
SVL




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Learn something new every day around here.
Nick
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PrecisionMachinisT writes:

Dessicants, lubricants, contaminants. They will not release water of hydration just because you apply a vacuum at ambient temperatures. Neither will slugs of free water trapped in lines, without either a lot of time or an external heating source.

Only in proportion to the heat added. It *will not* sublime at all if there is no heat added, even in a perfect vacuum.
The universe is full of solid water in the near-perfect vacuum of space. Comets are an example.
Commercial food freeze-drying apparatus provide a circulating heat medium on the trays. You can't just shove hunks of wet food in a vacuum chamber and pump it down to freeze-dry it, practically speaking. Neither can you dry out a wet HVAC system by leaving it on a vacuum. I know this is an article of faith in the HVAC trade, but it is a myth beacuse the tradesmen only learn a shallow smattering of chemistry and thermodynamics. And they just want to believe it.
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Ignore the entire concept of latent heat if its convenient to you then....
Point being is the heat was already added or subtrcated from the sytstem before or after the phase change took place........still, its pressure causing the actual change to occur.
Im done, your a fuckwit and my opinion still stands.

And I've heard that it's fucking hotter than hell out there, too...
--
SVL








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PrecisionMachinisT writes:

Haven't ignored anything.
(Regardless, I suspect you mean sensible heat.)

The heat initially present in the water itself, or something intimately in contact with it, will vaporize very little water, and in practice the ambient heat will not flow in quickly (the vacuum being an insulator).
And this only applies to free water. Ordinary vacuum dessication does not work for water bound in something like a silica gel dessicant, or entrained in the oil, or hydrating contaminants.
A lot of people have been taught the pseudo-scientific myth that "water boils in a vacuum" in some magic sense that it doesn't in the atmosphere. The truth is that water vaporizes in a vacuum or in the atmosphere the same way: *only* because you add heat. In the same sense, water doesn't boil at 212 deg F, it boils because you add more heat after it is at 212 deg F.
Another related myth is that if *you* were put into a vacuum, your body would explode or your "blood would boil". Pure bunk.
Another popular (and yes, even in the HVAC trade) myth is "saturation" of air with humidity, that the moisture is carried or dissolved in the air, and that it "saturates" like a solution of salt in water.
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Obviously then , some part of "Im done, your a fuckwit and my opinion still stands" has apparently still escaped your attention.
Bye bye idiot troll.........
--
SVL








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-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA1
On Sun, 21 Aug 2005 02:15:25 -0500, Richard J Kinch

Then you're all wet.
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iQA/AwUBQwjejAIk7T39FC4ZEQIO9QCguHSRV5tUO06ZeIVnzzonnEDuqsEAnjJ1 Imv1in/cDv3fIdImpY7Mj8dN =ZMXn -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
--
-john
wide-open at throttle dot info
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Sun, 21 Aug 2005 00:07:30 -0500, Richard J Kinch

I am not sure where you live but it is about 600 degrees F warmer than "space " on earth, even in the winter. There is plenty of available heat to sublimate water.
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Repeat after me: temperature is not heat.
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On Sun, 21 Aug 2005 00:41:04 -0500, Richard J Kinch

Repeat after me, a gas at a given temperature (ambient air) is heat.
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See cat...notice cat has a tail....pull on cat's tail........
Repeat until bored.
--
SVL




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Air = heat. Oxygen = heat. Nitrogen = heat...
Learn something new every day around here.
Nick
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On 22 Aug 2005 08:46:05 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

If that air, nitrogen and oxygen is anything but 0 degrees Kelvin it has heat. That is why we have "AIR" conditionoing in the first place.
For the purposes of this silly argument, water in the system will actually be touching the metal or in the oil, both excellent conductors of ambient heat. If the water is trapped in the dessicants of the dryer, who cares?, That should be in the trash by now and a new dryer in the system. If you are not replacing your dryers you are certainly a hack.
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Oh, you meant it CONTAINS heat...
Nick
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PrecisionMachinisT wrote:

I think Dido is talking about when you have a evap coil exposed to other cold temps within a running freezer.. a common occurence in the commercial world.
This is what the man meant, I believe.
Jake
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Jake,
Doesn't matter--next time it snows, watch your outside temp real close, and take note of any period over several days, or perhaps up to a week where the temp stays constantly below freezing....notice that the snow 'just kinda dissapears'....given enough time, it will eventually dissapear altogether, without ever reaching a temp above freezing, and without rain falling on it, etc.....now note that this process speeds up considerably at pressures below atmospheric.
--
SVL




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OK, I buy that! The info in your article also said "If you've got a week" or something similar. I don't think a tech in the field has that kind of time, so perhaps that's what Dido is addressing.
I've seen ice develop in commercial Vacuum systems, and it does not dissipate easily... it takes a long and slow pull. (NO one please make a inference from this given my comments below)...
I *do* understand the pressure relationship, believe it or not....
BTW, I think I was either drunk or high in 9th grade science class...or perhaps making passes at the lovely 'Tracey' that sat next to me, as I recall. Tracey ended up on crack or welfare, or both, I think...
Oh, I got an A in Science... maybe it was Math, or English... or something (-;.....
ahhhh... the '70's. DON'T TRY THIS NOW, KIDS!
Jake
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