220V dryer sparked on startup (3 wire) What to test?

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On Tue, 19 Nov 2013 09:01:09 -0600, bud-- wrote:

I'm not sure I fully understand, but it *does* appear to be as you say:
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5484/10951784553_afa8b636fc_o.gif
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On Tue, 19 Nov 2013 16:37:19 -0800, Oren wrote:

How you notice these things, from where you sit, and I don't even *see* it when I'm directly in front of it, I'll never understand.
You're right! It's dark outside now (and I buttoned it all up), but, here is a large-format picture that I had taken earlier.
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7325/10953807416_f38917aa93_o.gif
What would make that huge neutral get that hot so as to melt the insulation to a caramel color?
Could it be as simple as that rusty screw?
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Danny D'Amico wrote:

I wonder how long you have been living in that house not knowing all this? I never lived in a preowned house. I always had mine built to my liking(custom built) and have blue prints for building, hvac duct work, plumbing, electrical lay out in the house. When I do some work on them I always mark them on the prints. When I sell the house, new owner gets them.
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On Tue, 19 Nov 2013 19:37:42 -0700, Tony Hwang wrote:

I have no idea if that was there when I bought the house, or, if it's new. Now, at least, I have pictures to see what changes moving forward.
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On 11/19/2013 8:21 PM, Danny D'Amico wrote:

which might explain the brown insulation.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Tue, 19 Nov 2013 22:09:37 -0500, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I'll have to feel it for heat.
In daylight, I'll see if I can trace it to which circuit it feeds, and then I can feel it to see if it's hot or not.
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On Tue, 19 Nov 2013 18:57:19 -0800, Oren wrote:

I thought they had fixed that problem. But maybe I'm grandfathered in.
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On Tue, 19 Nov 2013 19:17:02 -0800, Oren wrote:

I'll turn the generator off, shut the 200 Amp breaker feed, and then see what I can do about the connections.
Thanks for noticing that.
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On 11/19/2013 10:24 PM, Danny D'Amico wrote:

With the power off (and ideally the switch padlocked shut) you might be able to loosen these screws, and wire brush the wires, screws, inside the connection, etc.
There used to be grey stuff sold, for protecting aluminum connections. Noalox (NOAH=locks) is one such. Might also be called Nocorode. (NO corrode.) I'm not sure if it's any good. I've seen it in the electrical department of pretty much any hardware store.
I don't know if a coating of heavy grease can be used, or which grease. I know we used to use car wheel bearing grease for auto electrical connections like battery posts.
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On Wed, 20 Nov 2013 07:05:31 -0500, Stormin Mormon wrote:

I have electrical dielectric in a can that oozes out like vaseline when you tilt the tube. Would that work?
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On 11/20/2013 10:00 AM, Danny D'Amico wrote:

that on my own panel.
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On Wed, 20 Nov 2013 10:34:14 -0500, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Thanks. It is for electrical work, but I bought it at the auto parts store 'cuz it's for car electronics (low voltage).
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On 11/20/2013 1:53 PM, Danny D'Amico wrote:

making dangerous reccomendations. The way I figure, it helps retard oxidation, and that's a good thing.
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On Wed, 20 Nov 2013 13:28:17 -0800, Oren wrote:

I must have missed that, but, I don't disagree. I love getting more torque, so, I'll look for those.
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On Tue, 19 Nov 2013 09:01:09 -0600, bud-- wrote:

The top three circuit breakers have HUUUUGE black wires coming out of them: Here's a closeup of the one on the left:
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2829/10951781763_970e674b81_o.gif
And, here's a closeup of the two on the right:
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3768/10951711724_11533c8587_o.gif
It looks like the top two actually go into a hole straight behind them:
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5484/10951784553_afa8b636fc_o.gif
And, it looks like there is both huge aluminum and huge copper wires in the mix!
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7343/10951716294_4293d38c02_o.gif
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On Tue, 19 Nov 2013 16:44:13 -0800, Oren wrote:

A *lot* of them are 100 amps!
I just went outside in the drizzle (our first rain in 8 or 9 months!) with a flashlight to read the numbers off the breaker paddles:
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5484/10951784553_afa8b636fc_o.gif
1. Top left 240V mongo breaker is 100A (labelled rec room panel). 2. Top right upper 240V mongo breaker is 100A (laundry room panel). 3. Top right lower 240V mongo breaker is 100A (labelled pool). 4. Bottom left top 240V baby breaker is 30A (labeled garage/well). 5. Bottom left bottom 240V baby breaker is 20A (seems to be a spare). 6. Bottom right top 120V baby breaker is 15A (seems to be a spare). 7. Bottom right bottom 120V baby breaker is 30A (can't make out the label). 8. Bottom middle panel breaker is 200A (probably I have 200A service).
PS: Why they write these labels in pencil is beyond me.
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Pencil may be erased if a change in the landing of the wires is performed (moving a circuit breaker for whatever reason).
We curse those who use pen. White-out is not always on board. :-)
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On Tue, 19 Nov 2013 21:28:16 -0600, Nightcrawler® wrote:

I hadn't thought of that!
Thanks.
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On Tue, 19 Nov 2013 09:01:09 -0600, bud-- wrote:

Thanks for explaining that. Someday, I'll get the courage to open 'em up, but for now, I'll leave 'em.
BTW, does the bottom left breaker in this picture look like a 220 to you that is not connected to anything? (Is it a 220v spare?)
http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3696/10951545765_ec38f77b97_o.gif
Also, why is there a single red wire in the top breaker? (All the others had black wires coming out.)
The only red I've seen in the past was for the switched hot wire of a switched lighting circuit.
I noticed there is no red wires going into any of those 2-inch holes:
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5510/10951717594_e5cd773bb7_o.gif
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On 11/19/2013 5:43 PM, Danny D'Amico wrote:

Red can be a power wire, it's often the other leg of a 220 VAC circuit.
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