0W20 oil

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hibb wrote:

Actually, 5W and 0W are the same by the SAE Standard for the low-temperature viscosity rating; only the low temperature cranking effort is slightly lower for the 0W as opposed to the 5W.
So, you'll have no lubrication issues using a 5W-20.
Here's the SAE J300 chart for comparison purposes... Low-Shear-Rate SAE Low Temp. Low Temp. Kin. Visc-cSt Grade Cranking Pumping Min. Max 0W 6,200 @ -35 60,000 @ -40 3.8           5W 6,600 @ -30 60,000 @ -35 3.8           10W 7,000 @ -25 60,000 @ -30 4.1           15W 7,000 @ -20 60,000 @ -25 5.6           20W 9,500 @ -15 60,000 @ -20 5.6           25W 13,000 @ -10 60,000 @ -15 9.3           20 5.6 9.3 30 9.3 12.5 40 12.5 16.3 40 12.5 16.3 50 16.3 21.9 60 21.9 26.1
I truncated and additional column for the high-temp high-shear viscosity as it didn't fit well and the above seemed adequate to demonstrate the general nature of the rating system.
The Low Temp cranking and pumping columns are in cP(oise) @ the listed temperatures in C. The kinematic viscosities are in cSt(okes).
It's the low temperature lubrication before the engine is warm that the W rating is for anyway as once it gets to operating temperature the other end of the spectrum is the key item.
Upshot is, go w/ the 5W-x and you'll be fine (and as someone else noted, if you take it to the dealer for service in all likelihood that's what they'll use, anyway... :) )
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hibb wrote:

since most people are hell bent on using multiviscosity oil, just use good old 10w30. Personally, i use straight 30 in all my vehicles year 'round.
steve
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Steve Barker wrote:

Some people do care about compatibility issues etc because additives vary with viscosity. Running straight weight oil is a relic from the long ago past. A car engine isn't some industrial gear box that is always in the same temperature range. Using a lubricant that changes viscosity as required is quite sensible and good engineering. This is especially true where using a heavy straight weight oil would make the vehicle unusable for half the year because you could never start it.
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George wrote: ...

Actually, that could be a major benefit under that scenario since if it isn't running at least it isn't running cold unlubricated because the oil is too viscous at low temperature to get to the upper parts of the engine. (wry :) )
This is particularly important w/ OHV engines...
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dpb wrote:

Aren't all engines since the early 50's OHV ??
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wrote:

That is a blanket statement that doesn't take into account, some of us live in the tropics where 30w always flows.
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On Mon, 05 Oct 2009 16:30:21 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

It was an accurate statement. He said it was "especially true where using a heavy straight weight oil would make the vehicle unusable for half the year because you could never start it."
That's in about 1/2 to 2/3 of the world for 1/4 to 1/2 the time.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Exactly, no blankets were used in the construction of my post..
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wrote:

My only point is you shouldn't beat someone up about their experience on an international newsgroup based on your experience in the arctic.
The other thing I would say is just about any oil will work in most engines for the life most people expect out of their car. Most cars are junked long before the engine blows up. In the little latitudes I care more about what the oil pressure is on a hot day than what the cold cranking characteristics are. Multi viscosity oils don't seem to hold up as long. 10w30 is 10 weight oil with a magic ingredient that makes it 30 when it gets hot ... until that ingredient stops working. Then it is just 10 weight or less
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On Tue, 06 Oct 2009 10:15:09 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

That is not what multi-viscosity oils do, or how they behave. No wonder you are confused.
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On Tue, 06 Oct 2009 10:34:48 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

It's close. Long chain polymer VI improvers coil up and thicken the oil somewhat when hot. (not thicher than when cold, but thicher than they would be without them) If and when these long-chain polymers shear, they loose their ability to stabilize the viscosity.
This is about half of how multigrade oils work. At the other end, pour point depressants keep the oil from thickening as much when cold, and friction modifiers reduce the cold strat friction, reducing the cranking power required to start the cold engine (which is part of the SAE test sequence for the XW part of the rating - so in reality a 10W30 oil is closer to a 15 weight oil with addatives - or even a 20, in the "real world"
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On Tue, 06 Oct 2009 10:15:09 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I'll "kinda" agree with you. Even here in Cenral Ontario, the "interlaken: region " of the "great white north" it gets hot enough in the summer that I do not trust an Xw20 or Xw30 conventional oil for highway use.
My summer oil in the 2.5 Mystique is 10W40 - changed before 6000 km (usually before 5000). The 3.0 liter Chrysler (mitsubishi) that preceded it used 10W40 in the winter and 20W50 in the summer for over 240,000 km an 18 years, as did both 3.0 liter Aerostars. My 2003 PT Cruiser runs 5W30 full synthetic Mannheim oil year round. 3 changes a year - no more than 4 months on a change which varies from 5-8000 km. If I hit 8000 km before 4 months (happens once in a while) it gets changed.
Today's "quality" multigrades do not suffer from serious shear degredation of viscosity in normal use with 5000km change intervals. With 10,000km change intervals (particularly summer highway driving with a load) I'd be worrying.
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George wrote:

blah blah blah. did you notice that the straight 30 still has the same sg or sh rating as your wonderful multi-vis? Also, multiple hundreds of thousands of miles on my '02, '03 and '04 vehicles with no ill effect. the multi-vis thing is a scam for gas mileage ratings only.
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Steve Barker wrote:

in use since before I was born. Sometimes the "new" thing isn't evil just because you think it is.
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George wrote:

I never said evil. Just unnecessary. Waste of money.
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wrote:

Tell the poor sucker in Moose Jaw Sak or Billings Montana that when he tries to start his car New Years Eve with 30 weight oil in it.
Or even in London Ontario, Detroit Michigan, or Oshkosh Wisconsin.
Now the 0W20 and 5W50??? Yup - fuel mileage ratings. Pure and simple.

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Steve Barker wrote:

Actually multi-viscosity has nothing to do with gas mileage, it has to do with excessive engine wear at start-up. At operating temperature the 5W30 and the 30 have the same viscosity.
In tropical climates you're probably fine with straight 30 in a vehicle that specifies 5W30, you'll get slightly more engine wear at start-up but not enough to worry about.
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wrote:

Sure, if the ambient temps where you live are the same as normal engine operating temps. Then it would be no problem.
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On Thu, 08 Oct 2009 12:13:02 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

The flow rate of straigt 30 at 45F is better than the flow rate of 5W20 at 0F - by a significant margin.
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George wrote:

OH, and BTW, i live in zone 5, granted not the coldest place in the US, but the oil has nothing to do with the ability to start the engine. I ran straight 50 in a 400 ford for years due to consumption issues and never had a bit of problem with it either. It also was used to push snow, so yes, it was used in the winter.
s
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