What's right soil for ROS cutting: sand, or perlite: what?

What happened to Miracle Grow potting soil? Thats what I would have used until I was told to use sand or perlite. I am not mixing a big batch, just enough to take a clipping from my dying Rose of Sharon and make a new one; to do a switch in time. I am quite out of my element here, but I was told to use sand or perlite, whatever it is or does, or why. I will need to go the HomeDepot, and if n/a there, I'll travel a little further to a nursery. Also I was told to use a few pots, with a few cuttings in each. I understand increasing the chances of getting a good one with a greater number of pots, but how can you use a few cuttings in each pot. I have black pot(s) 12" dia x 12"H. How would I space 3 twigs in one pot to wait to see which is good/best? A small circle all in the center, or 1/4, 2/4, 3/4 from one end, in line? A 6"Dia circle in the center? Would you move them later? How can you move it, dig it up, or make a trough and slide it? Would you pull 2 of the 3, how long before you know to keep one and pull the others, I only need one transplant? What if the good one is the side one? Isn't the point of having a big pot having lots of room on all sides? Or does 1/3 over not matter? Will I be waiting with three pot(s), with 1 best plant in each. I think the required transplant height will require 4 years of total growth.
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bent wrote:

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http://www.ask.com/web?q=what+is+perlite&search=&qsrc=0&o33&l=dir
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Maybe add some rootone to your recipes?
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bent said:

You want something that drains well. Peat-based potting soils (like MG) will retain too much moisture, and could rot the cuttings or make them more susceptable to damping off (google it, if you don't know what it means). That's the "why". I prefer sand.

Is your Hibiscus syriacus a clumping variety? That is, are there many "trunks" coming out at ground level? If so, then you'll want to start several cuttings in a pot.

That's a 2# (gallon) pot. That's a bit large for what you're wanting to do, to start with. I would use a 4" pot to start. Then, when it becomes root-bound, move it to a 1# pot. Once it becomes root-bound in that, it would go to a 2# or 3# pot. Again, once it's root-bound, then it's ready to go into the ground. Don't rush this, it takes time.

You're not doing it to 'wait and see which is good/best'. You're not going to thin them out unless some of the cuttings die.

Put 4-5 cuttings, spaced evenly, in the original pot (not something as large as a 2#).

Not until they're root-bound.

The same as planting any other potted plant, in a larger container. Place one hand across the soil level, supporting the entire mass. Turn the pot completely upside down, so the plant slides out (DO NOT pull the plants out, either from the top, or while it's upside down). If it won't slide, gently squeeze the sides of the pot (while still supporting the plants), until it slides out.

If it's grown as a standard, then you'll thin to one cutting. If it's a clumping variety, leave them all.

Don't over-think this, man. It's not rocket science. ;)

I rarely start one transplant, when it's going to be replacing a plant. That's a bit risky. Hell, I rarely start one transplant of anything. If I end up with more plants than I need, I can always find someone who wants the extras.

Why do you think that? Where did you come up with that number?
As to the procedure for taking the cuttings...
The best method, for the plant you're trying to propagate, would be a soft-wood cutting. this would be from THIS season's growth ONLY. This is the green, soft part of the branch, near the tip. Avoid material with flower buds if possible. Remove any flowers and flower buds when preparing cuttings so the cutting’s energy can be used in producing new roots rather than flowers.
Early morning is the best time to take cuttings, because the plant is fully turgid. It is important to keep the cuttings cool and moist until they are stuck. An ice chest or dark plastic bag with wet paper towels may be used to store cuttings. If there will be a delay in sticking cuttings, store them in a plastic bag in your refrigerator.
While terminal parts of the stem are best, a long shoot can be divided into several cuttings. Cuttings are generally 4 to 6 inches long. Use a sharp, thin-bladed pocket knife or sharp pruning shears. If necessary, dip the cutting tool in rubbing alcohol or a mixture of 1 part bleach to 9 parts water to prevent transmitting diseases from infected plant parts to healthy ones.
Remove the leaves from the lower one-third to one-half of the cutting. On large-leafed plants, the remaining leaves may be cut in half to reduce water loss and conserve space.
Treating cuttings with root-promoting compounds can be a valuable tool in stimulating rooting of some plants that might otherwise be difficult to root. Prevent possible contamination of the entire supply of rooting hormone by putting some in a separate container before treating cuttings. Any material that remains after treatment should be discarded and not returned to the original container. Be sure to tap the cuttings to remove excess hormone when using a powder (rooting hormone also comes in a liquid form, but it's more expensive).
Insert the cuttings one-third to one-half their length into the medium. Maintain the vertical orientation of the stem (do not insert the cuttings upside down). Make sure the buds are pointed up. Space cuttings just far enough apart to allow all leaves to receive sunlight. Water again after inserting the cuttings if the containers or frames are 3 or more inches in depth. Cover the cuttings with plastic and place in indirect light. Avoid direct sun. Keep the medium moist (NOT soaking wet), until the cuttings have rooted. Rooting will be improved if the cuttings are misted on a regular basis.
If you want to use hardwood cuttings, it's best to wait until the plant goes dormant. The rest of the procedure is the same.
HTH
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"I have a 50 yr old purple Rose of Sharon planted in my front yard in Toronto. It has a mossy green covering, and the whole thing is split at the base into the dirt, snd even those branches are split, pinned with bolts, and are dying and breaking off."
btw, whats the mossy stuff?
I was curious why there is branching at and into the ground, because of it, the tree looks like it is split (like its been damaged) and maybe it is, because it looks like one trunk was split into 3 or 4 branches down and into the dirt, and the bark didn't grow back cover the insides vry well. And I am curious if this will happen again, and if this complicates the clippings process, or time, or choice of clippings. And if I have a choice. Why do you say if it is a clumping variety, I should start several in a pot. Are they clumping together (is each branch is a clipping that has mingled together?). What would happen if I used a single in each pot (like 9 pots instead of 3x3pots) - would I get the same final result by using the best in eac scenario. Are you saying it takes mor ethan one clipping?
And why is someone saying several pots (w/ several in each pot)? Just increasing the odds again?
I came up with 4 yrs. only b/c theres one in my neighbors sidewalk that started itself that is about 6 foot high, and I can only remember it being there for maybe 5 years. The dying? original is maybe 12 foot high, and I can't see myself dropping in a tiny thing, and am only guessing. I am just going by 6 feet in 5 years and dividing. No idea really. How long do you think.
At any time before I transplant it into the yards' dirt, will I be changing to soil other than the original (ie egHD perlite, or sand) from pot to pot. To be honest I like the idea of using 12" pts, and not changing ever from the beginning until its ready to transplant. I have 2 for sure, and I may have another, or can get one more to make 3. Is this a problem?
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SO; I just did a little reading, but still need some back to basics My first task is to get the dirt: apparently HD has perlite, if not I could go to a nearby nursery. Assuming they have both, would I use?: 100% perlite 100% coarse builders sand a mix (& what %ages)
If I can I would just like to use the one and only pot(s) right up to transplant, but in that case the soil would be the same right from the beginning to the transplant time, or unless I re-used it, a waste of soil if I had to change all the soil in the large pots. Is one pot/soil possible, or am I supposed to put it into "soil" after at time, but before transplant time. Its ok; I just don't have an eficiency or space limitation, and it would be less fuss with single pot(s)/soils.
wrt the plastic greenhouse, is the top and everything compleltely closed off , and if so how do I water?
btw, I have three (+1) 12"Diameter pots: Are these big enough to get to any significant size?
12" H black plastic w/ 4 drain holes
10" H plastic w/ 4 drain holes
8" H ceramic w/ 1 drain holes
10" H ceramic w/ 0 drain holes
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I do have a larger collection of smaller pots.
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bent said:

Find something much finer than "course builders sand".

[...]
It's just a plastic bag to keep the humidity up. How difficult would it be to just remove the bag to water? Good grief. Common sense, man.

Save this one for the final pot-up:

This sounds like a 1#:

Don't use either of these:

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bent said:

Posting some pics to the web, and linking to them here, would be VERY helpful. Pics of "the mossy stuff", the entire plant, a closeup of a bloom, a branch, the "split base", and a leaf, would be ideal. ;)

I'm saying that it depends on the cultivar. There are probably hundreds of H. syriacus cultivars. Some grow more from a single trunk and some from many smaller trunks. Again, pics would be helpful.

If you only start one pot, the stock plant dies, and the cuttings don't survive, you're screwed. Both have to get through one (more) winter.

Is it the exact same cultivar? They're growth rates may be different. By starting more cuttings in a single pot, the shrub will fill out more quickly.

The sand is only the rooting medium. Once it's developed roots, and it's first potting up (from 4" to 1#), it goes into a well-draining, potting mix. During this process, most of the sand will probably fall off the roots, which is fine. The sand won't hold any elements or other nutrients, the potting mix will. The plant's water needs will also increase, and you'll need a medium that can hold more moisture.

If you're going to turn this advice-seeking thread into another waste of everyone's time (ignoring advice and requests for more info), as you did with all of the lawn threads, say so now, please. I've little time to waste explaing each and every step (the "why's", etc.), only to have you ignore the advice and do it "your way". If you already have a method in mind, and you're set to use it, no matter what, then just go do it.

Yes. Find some 4" pots to start your cuttings.
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bent said:

Ok. Got ya. Go fuck yourself. =)
*woogiewave*
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that's ok, I'm not gonna use cuttings now anyway. What do you call 'em?
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Well come on guys, what do you call 'em; the "buds" you take off the tree and put in soil that then grows into a plant. I was told to wait a little while longer so they turn a bit brown or something. Do you need a picture? That way I won't need Dr. Mengella.
wrote Go fuck yourself. =)

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With your attitude, why would anybody answer?
bent wrote:

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I'm gonna need that in writing

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