Pure seed

Is it possible or even desirable to buy one breed of grass ? I was thinking about putting in Thermal Blue after this summers brown-out of my lawn but I read the package contents for Scotts Pure Premium Heat-Tolerant Blue Grass Seed and noted that it's in fact only 10% Thermal Blue and the rest is Tall Fescue.
JD
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John wrote:

I've never had good luck with Scotts seed. I don't know why. But Tall Fescue has worked well. Lofts Rebel II is what I patch with and it seems to have stayed fairly green here in the Boston burbs even though the Summer has been dry. I've been hearing Jonathan Green's Black Beauty advertised and bought 5 lb for patching.
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Stubby wrote:

I have also had very good results with a southern facing lawn using the Rebel II blend after a severe drought in Southern NJ a couple years ago. I seeded a new lawn from scratch after having some topsoil delivered. I only water when needed after the roots got going. I'm too lazy to be dragging the hose around the lawn every day and the wife said no to a sprinkler system.
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Certainly it's possible, but not desirable. The advantage with a blend is that certain grasses do well in sun, some in shade, some weather better in drought, while others do better when cool and wet. A single grass may completely die off by disease where with a blend some will die and be replaced by others.
BTW, I would pass on any seed that has a lot of tall fescue; it's rank. Talk with you local county agriculture agent as to what he would recommend for your area (soil type and weather conditions).

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Most seed mixes will have a nurse grass, meant to germinate quickly to hold everything else in place. The nurse grass will then die off and be replaced by the other cultivars.
The poster below has made some very good comments as well.
One other consideration would be to check for insect damage if your brown spots have not yet recovered.
Peter H

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"BTW, I would pass on any seed that has a lot of tall fescue; it's rank."
Just about all turf experts would reject this assertion. The turf type tall fescues makes an excellent lawn and are very popular in quality lawn seed mix. They are also used for many athletic fields, play grounds and parks. In fact, they are even used by commercial sod growers. The benefits include less maintenance than blue grass, good drought tolerance, and quick to establish. The only tall fescues that I would consider rank are the older coarse type, but they are not used for lawns.
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4ax.com:

Try: http://www.penningtonseed.com/section/lawn_02.asp ? type=products&category=tall+fescues&idS5
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