Privacy Screen

Greetings all.
I live in Eastern Oklahoma (Zone 7) and am looking for a plant to use as a hedge/screen to shield about 250' of my property from the sight of traffic (and hopefully abate some of the noise) on a nearby road. I have privets there now which do a fairly good job until they lose their leaves in the fall.
Any ideas or suggestions on what to plant that would be fast-growing and drought resistant preferably native to the area.
Thanks in advance.
--Stu
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Stu said:

Upright junipers, boxwoods, and yews would all be good candidates for a screen. The junipers will require the least maintainence, and are xeric. Boxwoods are nice and dense, but grow less than a foot a year. Buxus sempervirens 'Handsworthiensis" would be a good choice for a boxwood. Yews would probably be the cheapest, however be thorough with your research on the cultivar. A lot of yews aren't drought tolerant. They also don't grow very fast, and any damaged areas on them take quite a while to fill in, due to the fact that the leaves are all at the ends of the branches, unlike boxwoods, whose leaves go much deeper towards the trunk.
250' is a long way to cover with a screen. For immediate results, you'll need to purchase larger plants, which could get expensive. If each plant has a 5' spread when mature, you're looking at 50 plants, possibly up to 15# pot size. You also may want to purchase one or two extra. Chances are good with that many plants, that you're going to lose a couple. You could also consider doing a double row, staggering the plantings. This would provide the best visual and sound screening, but also would double the cost of the project.
Keep in mind that whatever you plant, won't be immediately "drought tolerant/resistant". They'll all need regular watering until their roots develop.
HTH
--

Eggs

A man walks into a bar with a slab of asphalt under his arm and says: "A
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On Sat, 28 Oct 2006 09:11:31 -0500, Eggs Zachtly

Thanks Eggs.
I don't mind spending the money if the results are worth it. You have certainly given some good advice and will check in to all your suggestions. I especially like the idea of staggering the plantings.
--Stu
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Try the "Green Giant" variety of arborvitae --- several sites exist online with info. These are fast growing reasonably resistant. I've having several planted for same purpose ... my concern is deer-resistance but all persons I have spoken with, including extension services, say no issue.

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I planted a half dozen "Emerald Green" about 10 years ago. They recover well after snow storms and the deer are interested in them. Plus, they're CHEAP! I seem to remember $4.95 each in an end-of-year close out sale.
Buster Chops wrote:

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On Sat, 28 Oct 2006 18:00:57 GMT, "Buster Chops"

Thanks Buster.
Hadn't thought about the deer problem. I'll look in to the arborvitae too. A poster on another group suggested pyracanthas. Thoughts?
--Stu
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My suggestion -- if your planting area has enough depth -- would be not to use just one species, which might result in losing everything at once under the wrong circumstances (disease, drought, etc.) The variety would also provide a more attractive landscape and be a haven for bird life. Some evergreens, some deciduous for variety. Your extension service should have a good list of large shrubs and trees which do well in your locale -- If I were living there I would check out the evergreens that have been suggested, plus pyracantha, crepe myrtle, etc., but concentrate on native plants which are likely to be more acceptant of weather variations and less susceptible to disease. I would also check out some of the clumping types of bamboo for one part of the screen area. Regards --
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Thanks Jim.
I have only about 12 feet or so to work with. I have privets planted there now directly on the fence line. There is one chinese privet (I think) that stays green all year. I also have a few crepe myrtles closer to the house but they lose their leaves also.
I like the idea of staggered plantings and will do as much as I can. A poster in another group suggested pyracanthas with boxwoods which sound good to me. Another poster suggested Arizona cypress. My big concern is that I only need to hide 8 feet or so of vertical space and am a little concerned about the plants/trees getting out of hand. I'd like to keep the view minus the ugly road and traffic.
I emailed the OK extension office yesterday and hope to hear from them this week.
Thanks to all who have taken the time to post to this question. All ideas and suggestion are greatly appreciated.
--Stu
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