chain link fence query

We have approx 4 acres fenced with light 4' high chain link fencing at our church. Sections of the fence have been damaged or destroyed by big trees falling across it.
We're trying to figure out if repair of damaged portions is a "do it yourself" project or not for a couple of old geezers. Some answers to the below questions will certainly help us get an answer to this query:
a. Do steel line posts have to be cemented in?
b. Are there couplings and fittings which will enable us to splice top bar tubing (horizontal) pieces so that we can just walk up to a damaged section and fix it without having to tear out more fenceline?
c. As to putting replacement chain link material in place, it appears it might be as simple as vertically cutting off just prior to bent/damaged areas, and then splicing onto that and carrying the run all the way to the next good section.
d. Do we need to fasten the top edge of the chain link fence material to the horizontal tubing?
It may be that the make or break factor will be if we have to re-dig a bunch of post holes where posts have been knocked down. If we can do that with power augers, maybe OK. If not, we won't be able to handle hand digging of post holes.
If we have to cement the posts in that's going to be a real problem, too, as some of the areas are very inaccessible. Getting fresh mix concrete to them would require wheeling in a barrow quite a ways, one way, for each.
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think.
Chain link isn't supposed to be slack.

You can get precut small soft wire to just twist around it - not a big deal.

time and dig them by hand. They don't have to be that big or deep (only a foot if you use cement.

always an old wheelbarrow around. Mix it right on the spot in the wheelbarrow. You're only talking about a few shovel fulls of cement for each post.
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You can also simply pour the dry redi-mix into the hole and let nature take its course. The cement will absorb moisture or you can hose it a bit and it will set up just fine. May require additional bracing.
If you can get a power auger in there you can get a power wheelbarrow in there too. Ask the rental yard for a Dingo.
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Buy bags of ready mix concrete, haul them out to the site of the work. Then mix each bag (or two together if they are small bags) into the barrow tub, and slowly add water from a five-gallon bucket and mix well with a mason's hoe (has two holes in the blade). It means you don't have to haul the mix all around your yard.
RB wrote:

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