UV-C Light

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kjpro @ usenet.com wrote:

There is no telling you anything, you know all......... Just one question for you genius, how would the sun's UV-C get to a coil (**HINT**, that's why UV-C Light was created) that is in a house in a closet that's inside the plenum. Read more of hat I posted, I answered the questions already. Yeah, if you live in California. Too much pollution that its overpowering our natural resources to clean the air.
--
Jim - UV-C Light Purification
e-mail: snipped-for-privacy@uvclightpurification.com
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Sun's
I think you need to learn about *where* your own products are installed.
I said *condenser* coil you stupid ass salesman!! Now please tell me you don't *think* they're installed in some plenum that's in a closet!
BTW, how'd that coil get installed "in a house" "in a closet" that's "inside the plenum"? LMAO
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kjpro @ usenet.com wrote:

Your right again genius my mistake, what is the coil inside the plenum on a residential unit the "A Coil" is where I am talking about that's where the UV-C light is placed. Like I said I explained this before.
--
Jim - UV-C Light Purification
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our
"inside
Which doesn't answer my question to you about cleaning *condenser* coils does it? No
Here it is again: "Please tell me why we have to *clean* condenser coils. Afterall, the Sun's UV-C should be keeping them clean by your ideas."
You want to twist words to make it look like you're right. Just like a snake oil salesman.
Well, let me tell you, I'm not that gullable...
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It's lots more fun to put them on the "B Coil".
Ok... you've been asked this in more technical terms than you seem to understand, so let me ask you in really simple layman's terms---
Even if this thingy of yours does kill mold, break down organics, reduce pollen to "mere dust".... What in heaven's name stops those decomposition products from dirtying up the EVAPORATOR coil exactly the same way they would have when they were "active" pollutants. They're still particulates, man. How does the magic of UV-C remove them from the air stream?
Even more interesting; how the heck does an array of lamps _clean_ the surface of the coil? Sterilize, I could understand; but _clean_ ?
That's why your story comes across as pure crap.
LLoyd
LLoyd
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

You still use filters to filter out some particulates the smaller ones the filter will not and the light kills them in either the downstream air and 12" from the coil itself. The UV light bounces around in the system (aluminum being the best reflective source) and kills them and they will fall off the coil (I can show you pictures and case studies) as the pass through the light in the air stream. Not magic science. Mold grows on the coil and everything sticks to it. Mo mold on the coil means the coil will remain clean. Not crap either, it truth.
--
Jim - UV-C Light Purification
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That's because it *is* pure crap.

"Fall off the coil", yeah... just like everything else... it falls into the built-in trash can. LOL

Crap, Period...
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Indeed: Truly not magic science.

You're telling us that the only reason a coil lints up is from mold. And when there is no mold, the coil remains new-metal bright. Right?
So... how do you handle sticky aerosols like tobacco tars? Does the UV light magically render them solids so they just "drop off the coil", too?
If they survive the UV treatment and condense on the coil, are they no longer sticky?
Does the UV prevent a fiber of lint that sneaked through the filter (or which the filter even created) from folding around the edge of a fin and sticking from mechanical force? Can the UV then prevent other fibers from tangling with that one mechanically?
By the way -- what growth medium is there on bare aluminum fins for mold? Oh... yeah... all that organic stuff; lint, pollen, live/dead bacteria.... But WAIT... you said the mold made those things stick, but they were there first, or the mold couldn't grow. I'm confused.
So is it maybe the dust that makes the mold stick? No, you said the mold makes the dust stick. Hmmmm... Molds actively trapping food... interesting.
I think I'll stick to cleaning the evaporators, and keeping the grass out of the condensors.
Too much notmagicscience makes my head hurt. Besides, all the "it not" syntax makes me believe you're the same people putting aldehydes in toothpaste and melamine in pet food. I'm on a personal campaign to avoid buying any Chinese goods I can possibly live without -- and I read labels, and I talk to friends.
LLoyd
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

-------------------------- HVAC Coil Irradiation to kill *mold Downstream Air Purification -------------------------- Proven case studies, EPA Evaluation, Etc. http://www.uvclightpurification.com -------------------------- Find an additional source of income to your present HVAC business and provide a healthier environment for you clients, energy savings, and extend life of the HVAC. --------------------------- Please contact me with any questions or input that you may have.
Thank You
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<snicker>
When was it that mold began to need "living" growth media?
LLoyd
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Most of whats in it is food for the mold.
--
Jim - UV-C Light Purification
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That's some more of your notmagicscience. Most of what's in it AFTER it's dead is still food for the mold. UV can't completely break down bacteria, et.al.., at the residence time your lights have to work on them. It mostly just kills them, as much from oxidization action of the ozone generated as from the direct incidence of the light. Even breaking up the proteins and carbohydrates like cellulose still yields compounds that are "organic" in nature (ever heard that term? No, I didn't think so). Many of even the simplest organic compounds can still be processed as food for molds and bacteria.
So... you don't eliminate _anything_ that causes all these problems except for living molds on the surface of the evaporator; and there are many places in the air stream where they can live that your silly lights can't reach -- like on the _other_side_ of the evaporator. (it have two side?)
LLoyd
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Yes the UV-C light will kill them and break them down. Organic are one that are most easily killed by the UV-C light. If a typical HVAC system has 6 - 7 air exchanges per hour, everything will have been circulated once the cfm of a system has been completed. Most HVAC systems on bring in 10% of fresh air to maintain their efficiencies. The rest is fouled air full of contamination recirculated over and over again. Engineers, scientists, EPA, Gsa, McGill Study, 3rd party case studies, petri sample test, etc. all confirm the effects of the UV-C light. These are not my opinions, forget everything I have said and argue with experts in the field that have developed, tested, and evaluated UV-C Light. They are 99.9% effective.
--
Jim - UV-C Light Purification
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Dear Lloyd E. Sponenburgh:
wrote:

Well, photoactivation and the resultant oxidation will fundamentally change the food source, so the food source is (possibly) less toxic, less allergenic. But you are spot on, "reinfection" downstream is only prevented by ozone and NOx formed by the lights. And mold is the problem usually, not the food source. If anything the oxidation makes the food supply even more tasty and desirable.

Think cube. It has six sides in 3D space, "1.5" of which can be bathed in UV-C light from a single source/bulb (which doesn't reflect too well). The "0.5" face is the fins at a very steep angle, which is really not very good coverage.
UV lamps are not a bad idea, but they really need to be used to periodically treat all the areas in contact with the air, and the condensation sump too. And they have to be cleaned, along with all the treated surfaces. They might stretch out the period between cleanings though... "silly" might not be the best thing to call them. Or the worst.
David A. Smith
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dlzc wrote:

Glad you pointed these areas out. Aluminum is the best reflective source for UV-C Light so the light will be reflected and bounce in many areas (including the 0.5 fin) of the HVAC and Clean areas that from conventional cleaning techniques as in power washing that will add water (moisture) to allow the mold to grow a faster rate than it was prior to the cleaning. or uncloogers that contain chemicals that will add VOC's to the already fouled air that is being circulated throughout the HVAC system.
--
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Gotcha! Earlier you said that condensate (water...duh!) was what flushed the "dead" materials off the evaporator. Now you're saying the presence of water worsens the situation.
Yeah, "certain" uncloogers(sic) contain VOCs. Ordinary water solutions of surfactants don't.
LLoyd
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Lloyd E. Sponenburgh wrote:

Condensation is going to happen on the coil period. Even with the UV-C application the condensation will still be present, but it will prevent mold, etc. I said if you were to power wash a coil you will add large amounts of water that will not cure a problem but in fact add to the problem. Condensation is just a little bit different than a pressurized wand spaying gallons of water.
--
Jim - UV-C Light Purification
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Dear Home Enviro Health Specialists:
On Jun 7, 8:35 am, Home Enviro Health Specialists
...

Aluminum *at best* compton scatters UV-C into less-energetic-than-UV- C, which means the first reflection is less effective at sterilizing than the incident radiation was. That is why I "rated" it as 0.5 effective. http://www.thomasregister.com/olc/54746003/coatings.htm ... not the severe decrease in reflectance of aluminum at shorter wavelengths. And this is *polished* aluminum, not that tortured and roughened stuff in an A/C unit.

Sorry, no. The reflected UV does not "scour" the fin surface. Only "elbow grease" can do this. All the light can do is keep it bright and fully oxidized.
David A. Smith
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dlzc wrote:

Dave again I have no idea what your talking about, the website that you list is a company selling coatings for aluminum. Of course it will not "scour", but I would like to see some photos of you getting an implement into every single little fin and penetrating deep enough to "scour" each individual one with elbow grease. The UV-C will keep the coil clean from containments that are in the fouled air and will not allow mold to grow, thus lowering the restrictions on the air flow.
--
Jim - UV-C Light Purification
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