Portable A/C Units

Hello,
I'm looking for a cooling unit to use in a garage "wood shop" that will make things comfortable this summer. This garage doesn't have windows, so a window unit isn't a viable option. I am entertaining the thought of getting a portable 12000 BTU unit (such as an Amcor) and installing a dryer vent fitting on the side door of the garage. Noise isn't much of a concern as I typically have hearing protection on anyhow. I've got several dedicated circuits as well. So, what is the general feeling on these portable units in terms of effectiveness, longevity, etc.?
Thanks in advance.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Mini-split
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Mini-split? What's this?
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's a small, ductless, two piece air conditioning system (Heat Pump models are also available).
The indoor unit hangs on the interior wall. It's connected to the outdoor unit via a small hole in the wall to run the line set and control wiring. Then you have the outdoor unit.
If you go to Goggle and type in "mini split", you will find as much reading as you'd ever want on the subject. Like the link listed below.
http://tinyurl.com/2judcw
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
go for it

Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24 Apr 2007 13:03:33 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Maybe it's me!!!! This is a wood shop, and you can't frame in an opening for a window shaker.
Barry
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Do not listen to stormy, he was recently released from the HVAC mental institution and is delusional. Sorry Chris, I didn't want to have to let everyone know, but you have been a very bad boy lately!
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

its you Barry. you're probably unaware of the huge number of wood framed homes that have an inch+ of stucco covering the exterior of a home / garage. I'll bet you also dont know that the stucco is applied in three seperate coats, a scratch coat, a brown coat & a color coat.
personally, I thing a portable is the perfect application for this situation.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I can't see what the Stucco covering has to do with the installation of a window unit. If you can't cut the hole close enough without needing to redo the Stucco, you better get somone else to do the job!
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hmmm most resi garages are framed w/ studs 16" on center, meaning you're going to cut at least one. Now, to do the job right, it has to be headed out. You do realize that with stucco, there is no exterior wall sheeting, it consists of tar paper & chicken wire thats nailed right to the studs. Ok, now that you've used your masonary blade in your skill saw to cut the stucco/chicken wire mess, just how do you plan on re-attaching the stucco covered chicken wire back to the new headers you framed in? You did back cut the studs 1-1/2" to allow for the depth of the headers, correct? I suppose you'll remove the sheet rock in the inside so you can nail the new headers to the existing studs? Then maybe you plan on drilling thru the stucco so that you can secure the cut edges of the stucco to the new headers around the hole you just cut? What?? You have no intenions of re-attaching the stucco to the new headers?
I would venture a guess you've never seen stucco in your life and have goose-egg for experience in cutting / and or patching it.
Oh by the way, who is paying to do all this wall surgery?
Ok, so now you got a hole in your wall. I guess we get to run some surface mount conduit & tie that back into the panel for a dedicated wall plug.
That portable is looking sweeter & sweeter by the moment.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

redo
Stainless screws or nails. :-)

Messing with the drywall (if the interior is finished) is far easier.

Yep, or reach in and install stud scabs, then attach the headers to them. Imagination is the limiting factor. :-)

Nail, screw, then cover the attachments with an outdoor coating. Or install an outside trim. Imagination is the limit to most projects.

I have in fact messed with Stucco...

The homeowner pays the bills... as in this case, it's his own A/C installation.

Or a nice little mini-split. :-)
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hi,
I'm wondering if a 12000 BTU portable A/C unit would be capable of making a 3-car garage tolerable in 100 degree weather. I'm looking at the Amcor portable 12000 BTU unit with the dryer-style exhaust duct. I'm not expecting to bring the garage temp down to the high 60s or anything. But if I could get it into the high 70s or low 80s that'd be fine.
Any other info regarding these portable units would be appreciated.
Thanks.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Would depend on the garage.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I own a 9000 BTU Royal Sovereign single hose unit. My experience is that the single-hose portable unit seems like it has the half the cooling power of a window unit with the same BTU (who knows, maybe less than half the cooling power of a 9000BTU window unit). Problem with the single-hose portable units is that they exhaust the hot air from the condenser out of the room. This creates negative pressure in the room, and if installed in a house, the room will draw air back into it from other rooms and ultimately from outside the house. The BTU rating of single-hose portable units does not factor in the warm air that is ultimately being drawn back into the house.
If I were a betting man, there is no way you are going to get upper 70s or low 80s in hundred-degree weather by installing 12000 BTU portable AC if it is a single hose unit. Maybe if it were dual-hose there might be a chance. You can get dual-hose units which solve the negative pressure issue by having an additional intake hose that uses outside air to cool the condensor, but I'm told that the manufacturers tend to warn against keeping the intake hose connected if the outside temp is above 90 degrees because there is a chance the condenser could overheat. If I were getting a dual-hose unit I would make sure it is okay to keep the intake connected hose up to 100 degrees outside. (I'm not sure I understand higher outside temps would be problematic for keeping the intake hose connected...after the condenser on window units and split systems are subject to those high temps.)
Please keep the group informed what you decide to go with and whether or not it worked to your satisfaction.
Jay
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

NO, please dont. Inform Jay only by email because no one in here really gives a rats ass. Bubba
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Problem I see is sawdust......
Here is a cheep way. Buy to identical outside units for a heatpump. (The thing with the compressor in it.)
Mount one outside. Put one inside the garage. Take the reversing valve and compressor out of the inside unit. Pipe up the inside unit to act as the evaporator for the outside unit. It should be easy because it will already have the expansion valve in place. All you will have to have going through the wall is the vapor and liquid refrigerant pipe and drain pipe.
Put a pan under the inside unit with a drain pipe running outside. The condensation from the coils will drain into the pan and out side through the pipe.
You will have a abuse resistant evaporator unit on the inside. And you will be able to wash it out with a simple garden hose when it gets plugged up with sawdust.
Temperature control will be a thermostat on the wall.
I have often thought about using a outside condenser/heatpump unit for an inside portion of an air conditioner in a workshop. It's as close to a ruggedised unit as you can get for cheep.
It will withstand the impact of an occasional 2x4 without problem. And it's coil is in full view for easy cleaning. And it will be simple to put together.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24 Apr 2007 13:03:33 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

For a seasoned professional wood worker this is a no brainer!!!! Weather it be stucco, aluminum, or brick siding. The cost of a stand alone unit verses a window shaker trumps everything.
Barry
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Agreed. Cut the hole in the wall, frame it and move on.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.