do I need a condensate pump?

My house is 24 years old; I have lived here 16 years. The furnace is a 95% about 5 years old. There is an A/C also. The humidifier also drains to it.
Two years ago there was water on the floor next to my furnace. The repair man said that the condensate drain was clogged; he blew it open with compressed air.
This year the man cleaning my furnace said the drain was slow and he blew the drain open. He said it was likely to clog and recommended I install a condensate pump.
The condensate drain goes into the floor. There is a bathroom with a drain in the concrete floor on the opposite side of the wall from the condensate drain. I presume the condensate drain plumbs into the bathroom drain, but I don't know that; it could just go into the space beneath the floor.
I asked the guy why it was clogging, but he didn't know. I asked him if draino would be worthwhile; he said it couldn't hurt.
So, my questions... 1) Why would the drain be clogging after being fine for 20 years? In fact, why would it clog at all? Isn't condensate just water? 2) A fitting inside the furnace has clogged twice also; the guy says they designed it too small and it is subject to clogging if not cleaned regularly. Clogged with what? 2) Would draino be a good try? (In the drain, not the furnace!) 3) Wouldn't a condensate pump be just as likely to clog as a condensate drain?
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I have blown out condensate drain lines that would partially clear, but could tell they were still restricted. Took the lines apart and found the lines full of semi solid crud with about a 1/4" hole in the crud. You can blow them from now till doomsday and never get them clear. Sometimes they can be taken apart and rodded out or replaced. My experience with Liquid Plumber/ Drano is that you could use liquid dish soap and get about the same results--none. I have used professional type drain opener from HD and Lowes --at about $10/bottle--- with good results. The company I'm with likes to install pumps, but I personally use them as a last resort only. FWIW, I'm talking about a/c drains only-- there are probably not a dozen condensing furnaces or humidifiers here. Larry
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jack wrote:

Jack;
Did anyone take the time to look for the drain termination? Sometimes instead of draining into the sewer, they will terminate outdoors in the flower bed next to the residence. Walk around the house and see if leaves and other obstructions haven't clogged the end of the drain pipe. Sometimes landscapers will redo the flower bed and overfill the area clogging the drain. Sometimes homeowners will pour a new patio slab and cover over the drain not knowing what it was for. A little checking can go a long way.
--
Zyp



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Jack, A condensate pump is nice.......................if you need it. In reality, it is another device that will eventually clog, leak or break. On condensing furnaces, I flush them out with hot water on every winter check up. Usually about two gallons right through the secondary and the condensate trap. They do get clogged with shit. Flue by products and condensate create crud, plain and simple. It has to be flushed. Your under floor drain is the same way. Put a tee with a short pipe and cap somewhere in the condensate line (NOT in the furnace). Every month pull the cap off, insert a funnel and dump a gallon or so of hot water through it flushing all of your condensate lines all the way to where it exits under the floor or at the floor drain? After that, pour a few ounces of bleach through it. (Again, NOT through the furnace condensate passages). Very little work for a clean running drain. Remember, dark and damp (as inside a drain) are great conditions for growing slime, mold and collecting crud. Flush it, Flush it, Flush it. Bubba Bubba
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wrote:

That is how I felt; adding a mechanical device when gravity will do can't be right.
Actually the drain is already open. The drain line goes up vertically; the furnace and humidifier go down and then horizontally to Ts on the drain line. The drain line is open at the top, so I can just pour the hot water in there. Unless it is completely clogged (which I know about because the furnace stops) it will not affect the furnace.
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The hot water and clorox should help. Have at it.
--
Christopher A. Young
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It's not just water...

BS, it's clogged with all sorts of shit...

No
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