Bypass humidifier installation

I have a gas forced hot air furnace with an Aprilaire 560 Humidifier. I would like someone to verify that the humidifier was installed correctly and if so, explain how it works in this configuration.
The unit is installed on the return plenum via a square hole in the plenum. The unit sits in front of this opening. There is a 6" round duct that connects the left side of the unit to the supply plenum of the furnace.. In this round duct there is a vent lever to control air flow. During winter this vent is open
So if I understand this correctly... as warm air leaves the furnace "SOME" air is forced through the humidifier via the 6" duct. it passes through the water panel back into the furnace via the square opening in the return plenum where it is re-heated and sent back through the supply plenum where some gets returned to the house while some gets sent back to the humidifier.
Am i missing something ? this just seems inefficient.
Thanks Ollie -------------------------------------
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pretend you have a water line with 2 tees 12 inches apart. the top of each tee has an elbow with a piece of pipe connecting them _________

is your water pressure or the flow of water through the pipe any less "efficient" ?
here is your owner's manual in PDF format
note: even power humidifiers can be mounted on the return air duct (not restricted to the supply air plenum). In either style, power or by-pass the filter can catch any "white powder" (calcium, salt and other impurities in your water source) keeping your home "dust free" (more effecient?)
the 6" round duct should have a damper on it if you have air conditioning so that you can close it in the summer time during A/C operation.
the water supply line can be from either cold or hot water source. hot water is best, this makes your humidifier more efficient because hot water vaporizes easier than cold and you're going to use BTU's to heat the water in the air (eventually) whether it be via your furnace or your hot water tank.
the 560 is a bit out-dated, you should upgrade to the 600A - consult your local licensed HVAC contractor and get it scheduled ASAP - winter is here my friend.
face=Arial size=2>...</FONT></DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>&gt; <BR>&gt; I have a gas forced hot air furnace with an Aprilaire 560 Humidifier.&nbsp; I<BR>&gt; would like someone to verify that the humidifier was installed correctly<BR>&gt; and if so, explain how it works in this configuration.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; The unit is installed on the return plenum via a square hole in the<BR>&gt; plenum.&nbsp; The unit sits in front of this opening.&nbsp; =There is a 6" round duct<BR>&gt; that connects the left side of the unit to the supply plenum of the<BR>&gt; furnace.. In this round duct there is a vent lever to control air flow.<BR>&gt; During winter this vent is open<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; So if I understand this correctly... as warm air leaves the furnace "SOME"<BR>&gt; air&nbsp; is forced through the humidifier via the 6" duct. it passes through<BR>&gt; the water panel back into the furnace via the square opening in the return<BR>&gt; plenum where it is re-heated and sent back through the supply plenum where<BR>&gt; some gets returned to the house while some gets sent back to the<BR>&gt; humidifier.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Am i missing something ?&nbsp; this just seems inefficient.<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Thanks<BR>&gt; Ollie <BR>&gt; -------------------------------------<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; ##-----------------------------------------------##<BR>&gt; Delivered via&nbsp; </FONT><A href="http://www.thestuccocompany.com/"><FONT face=Arial size=2>http://www.thestuccocompany.com/</FONT></A><BR><FONT face=Arial size=2>&gt; Building Construction and Maintenance Forum<BR>&gt; Web and RSS access to your favorite newsgroup - <BR>&gt; alt.hvac - 26851 messages and counting!<BR>&gt; ##-----------------------------------------------##</FONT></BODY></HTML> ------=
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Yep, that's how they work. And you close the damper on the side of the unit for summer cooling weather.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Nov 17, 4:15 pm, ollie2308_at_yahoo_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (ollie2308) wrote:

A house that is built tight and ventilated right should have no need for a humidifier. When is our building industry going to start building homes correctly?
Andy
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A house that is built tight and ventilated right should have no need for a humidifier. When is our building industry going to start building homes correctly?
---------------------------------------------
When they quit trying to build them cheap
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On Sat, 22 Nov 2008 08:23:34 -0800 (PST), Andy Energy

WTF?? Whe you heat air you dry it. Thus the need to ad moisture. Where did you come up with that surmization? Bubba
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Bubba wrote:

Every few months this idiot comes up with that shit. That Moron Nick Pine had the same tune.
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ICheck the psychometric chart. Raising the temperature of air does not add or remove water. It only changes the RH. The only reason a house dries out is because of air with less moisture is introduced through uncontrolled means. Thus the air with enough moisture leaks uncontrolled out of the house.
As to where the house gets its moisture from is the occupants. The breath, perspire, bath and cook to name a few.
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Andy Energy wrote:

A modern home since the early 1970's has a total wrap around vapor barrier. Modern very tight well insulated homes also being ventilated to code do have over humidity causing black mod or sick house syndrome. Other such homes show a large lack of humidity.. There is no typical situation. Obviously you are another dumb fuck without an iota of experience and come here to shoot off your mouth and prove your lack of both to everyone. Now stick a psychometric chart up you ass and go back to molesting the neighbors cat.

Not everyone is a fat sweathog like you. I guess you forgot ground moisture also. the environment changes constantly..
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Your basic message can be correct, depending on the region. Here in the mid-Atlantic, and other humid or mixed humid regions, over- humidifying is a problem in some newer houses. In others, built leaky (even with their "wrap around vapor barriers"), the winter humidity levels can be uncomfortably low. I always recommend that my clients monitor the indoor humidity to keep it at safe levels, especially if they have central humidifiers.
What many are unfamiliar with is the structural damage that is often caused by over-humidification. Every standard construction home has a variety of leaks, particularly on interior walls where most builders don't think it's important to air seal. That moist, interior air moves up through those walls, out the cracks and into the attic. Recessed lights are another particularly bad area for this. All the vapor barriers in the exterior walls won't stop any of this moisture drive from the inside from leading to condensation in the walls/ceiling with the way most houses are built. All these leaks then cause more dry air so the homeowner pumps more humidity into the home to compensate.
The worst situations I've seen is when people leave their filter cover off with an attic mounted air handler. Now you're sucking a few hundred CFM of cold, dry winter air into the system, which sucks the moisture out of the air like nothing else while at the same time forcing more moist air out through the cracks. A properly installed and sealed HVAC system is one of the most important elements in maintaining proper humidity and minimizing the chance for structural damage due to moisture drive.
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On Sun, 23 Nov 2008 21:41:27 -0800 (PST), Andy Energy

Shoot yourself now Andy because you dont know of what you are spewing. Bubba
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Andy Energy wrote:

I guess you have never been to Phoenix.. That clap trap your peddling is pure bullshit. There are many tight and well insulated plus ventilated. homes that require humidifiers. Why the hell do you think every distributorship has racks of them... Home Depot, Lowes, Mennards and every damned hardware and lumber yard. I think its time for you to pack your ass back to Alt.Homeowner and alt.idiots. How well do you think a home in cold country is ventilated? Do you even have a clue as to how many folks need a well filtered and humidified home for allergies, Lung and other breathing problems. You being on the Pacific coast might even get wet if your close enough.
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I'd tell you what i think of your foul mouth but my mother taught me to be nice and not sink to your level.
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Andy Energy wrote:

I would worry more about you getting your ass kicked then what your Mommy says. You rudely come to our house and then think we are going to be gracious hosts?
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I presume you mean summer time? Any building with ventilation (even opening the door) will lose humid air during the winter. And therefore need a humidifier for comfort during winter.
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Christopher A. Young
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