2nd thermostat

I am not an HVAC tech. I was wondering if it is possible to add a 2nd thermostat to my HVAC system. Currently, I have a digital thermostat downstair and was planning to add a 2nd one upstair. The reason for this is because, during summer time, upstair will still be very hot and the thermostat will shut down the AC since it has reach the set temp downstairs. I plan to use one thermostat at a time only. During daytime, it will be the one downstair and duirng night time it will be upstair. I plan to connect the 2 in parallel. Do you see any problem with this type of connections. I know there are wireless device out there, but I still prefer hardwire.Appreciate any input on this.
Thanks Tony
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sounds like its not a thermostat issue, so installing a 2nd stat won't help. What you most probably have is a zoning issue. Let me guess... 2 floors and only 1 system. To correct your problems is not going to be cheap and will result in at the very least, either having the ductwork re-designed/replaced with zoning damper(s) and the appropriate returns and bypasses. OR you can replace the downstairs system with a smaller one, install an upstairs system, and redesign/replace all the ductwork for both floors Either way, its not going to be cheap, and its not what you wanted to hear. FWIW, I just quoted a simular type situation for 2 heat pump systems, with the appropriate ductwork, and complete installation for around $15,000.

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wrote:

cheap bastard :-) Bubba

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Sorry, it was a typo... was supposed to be $25,000
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i dont see any problems. go for it.
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wrote:

But get programmable ones, that way you don't have to set them everyday.
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Installing two Tst. in percale Will not solved you problem
But it can help you can change your supply air some how
It depend on setup of your ducting system
And internal configuration of your house.
So for the summer try to close your supply air down stairs
And just use one up stairs these will force your cold air
To go up there where you needed must in summer,
You need not worry about return it will find the way back.
Tony

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Oh my GAWD! You should be tied up and hung by your nuts for what you just said. "Close all the downstairs supply air". That will effectively cut your duct work in half yet you are still sending the same amount of CFM through it. What do you think happens next? "Dont worry about the return" ??? Ok, now you're just being retarded. Sounds like true words of a hack there Tony. Bubba

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Do you read what you type?
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With that logic, you may as well just set the one thermostat you have down low at night. Installing a 2nd thermostat upstairs is useless, if all the air is in one zone.
-Canadian Heat
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I sympathize with your problem. Yes the guys are right...too often a 2 storey house with only one system works poorly. It amazes me that when you consider the cost of a house that the HVAC Systems is most are archaic in this day and age...Ideally you should have separate zoning...
Having said that, it is not a perfect world and we all dont have money to re-engineer the system...Here is a trick that I have used with customers in your situation and all are happy with the inexpensive solution and excellent results....
Go and purchase a Honeywell or Carrier thermostat that has a remote temperature sensor option on it..At that time, you purchase one additional sensor so now you have one thermostat with 2 sensors. Locate one temperature on the main floor wherever you like...Locate the other one upstairs where you like...You wire a wall switch in somewhere that switches the sensors...a three way switch from Home Depot works for this...in the daytime, the switch is connected to the main floor sensor so the AC unit will control to satisfy the main floor...When you go to bed, you flip the switch and the thermostat is now looking at the sensor upstairs and ignoring the main floor...Next morning flip it back...
Problem solved...minimal cost...of course you will hear lots of heckling from this group...but give it consideration...good results for about $150.00...
Steve

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Ding! There's a few more pieces involved with multiple zones than several thermostats.

I doubt it.

So, you don't understand that the remote sensor on most any thermostat that a HoMoaner will likely be able to purchase is for dsplaying the temperature, and has no effect on determining whether a setpoint is reached? Or, are you trying to explain to him that he needs to open up the thermostat - I'll use a T8611 for an example - and disconnect the internal temperature sensor, install a switch in the thermostat, and connect an (aquired from who knows where because the internal sensor is a diode, and the external sensors are thermistors) remote sensor to it, so he can switch between them. What about the fact that he's trying to cool the second floor from the first floor. You don't think he'd have to get it a little nippley downstairs before upstairs even begins to feel cool? He didn't describe whether there's any ductwork for the second floor as far as I saw in his post.

Actually, a decent Window shaker would go for a bit more than that and would be more likely to resolve the issue.
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No, I am not trying to explain to him to open up the thermostat and disconnect the sensor... As I indicated, he should purchase a thermostat that has remote sensing capabilities such as a Honeywell Vision Pro TH Series (TH8110U1011) with 2 remote sensors (T7189U1005) and a swithing arrangement to switch the two sensors. Yes, I realize that it may get a little nippley downstairs, but he has the option and flexibility to program his new programmable thermostat to find a setpoint that works...
Again, I realize this is not an ideal situation, and I also realize that there is more to zoning than thermostats. He is not asking for a window shaker. I agree, that is a good solution. He is simply asking how to use a separate thermostat for two locations, not how to re-engineer or re-design his home HVAC system. If he asked that question, I would certainly have some good advice for him...Keep it simple...
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Thanks for the idea Steve. Since 4 wires go into my thermostat, I will buy 4 pole toggle switch and identical thermostat so I can switch between the 2 thermostat. With the switch, only 1 thermostat is use at any given time. Hopefully, my cost will bring it down to $80. Again, appreciate your help.
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you
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Never experienced the workings of a Honeywell ProVision Series...
What a shame... they're only one of the best stats on the market today.
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