Which of these are easy to grow?

Hello,
I'm interested in trying to garden, but I've never had good success with it. Below, I have a list of plants. Which of these will do well in Wisconsin (Zone 4 in winter, cool in summer) and are EASY to grow? I admit, I'm NOT a good gardener.
Thank you for your help!
Ajuga Astilbe Astrantia begonia bleeding heart browallia (sapphire flower) Caltha campanula (Canterbury Bells) Cerinthe coleus columbine Corydalis Dicentra Dodecatheon Epimedium Euonymus fuchsia geranium Helleborus Houttuynia impatiens Mertensia mimulus (monkey flower) Myosotis myosotis (forget-me-not) nemophila (baby blue eyes) nicotiana (flowering tobacco) Omphalodes Oxalis Parthenocissus Primula Pulmonaria salvia shamrock thunbergia (black-eyed Susan vine) Tiarella torenia (wishbone) Tricyrtis Trillium veronica Vinca viola (pansy) Violets
Thank you very much!
Ted Shoemaker
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you might be close to the lakes??
http://66.102.7.104/search?sourceid=navclient-menuext&q che:http%3A%2F%2Fplantsdatabase.com%2Fzipbyzip.php%3Fzip%3D53181 but the first two (and maybe others in the list) are indoor/greenhouse only!

at barnes and noble, this book looked good to me. Growing Perennials in Cold Climates. John Whitman and Mike Heger
should be able to find it used http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&q=growing+perennials+in+cold+climates
and get http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&q=%22Sunset+National+Garden+Book%22

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&ie=ISO-8859-1&q=Ajuga+pyramidalis++%22zone+3
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&ie=ISO-8859-1&q=Astrantia++++%22ontario%22+%7C+Wisconsin+%22zone+3%22
many species, blow your mind here: http://www.funet.fi/pub/sci/bio/life/plants/magnoliophyta/magnoliophytina/magnoliopsida/campanulaceae/campanula/index.html http://www.funet.fi/pub/sci/bio/life/warp/plants-3-English-Photolist.html

http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&q=thalictrum+zone+3
preferring moisture.

native to north prairie/plains, but it's probably boring looking

immediate interest to me (see my imminent post!)

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&ie=ISO-8859-1&q=Salvia+Betsy+Clebsch+&btnG=Google+Search pics of many salvias, but a california author.

overwinter in WI?

also Siberian iris do well lilium (true lilies) hostas of course. tulips sedum
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&ie=ISO-8859-1&q=poppies+hardy+%22great+lakes
and beware of http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&q=Wisconsin+weeds+%7C+%22escaped+exotics%22 +
conversely (!) north central Europe should be good http://www.plantideas.com/alpine/link.html
============ (Amazon.com product link shortened)
check out Canadian gardening books. http://www.telusplanet.net/public/pchenier/thesis/appendixa.html
Lois Hole series, these are good. Nice number of recommended plants, easy reading. (Amazon.com product link shortened)
nice WI list http://www.wpt.org/garden/resource /
has rep, but I've never visited: http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&q=%22Minnesota+Landscape+Arboretum%2C+Chanhassen%22
I've never seen
(Amazon.com product link shortened)77945713/sr=5-1/ref=cm_lm_asin/002-0929535-2175244?v=glance but reviews look good. Google author: Melinda Myers. Host of Great Lakes Gardener, is an instructor in horticulture at the Milwaukee Area Technical College and holds a ... mptv.org/glghome/melinda/myers.html
NARGS, start googling here http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&ie=ISO-8859-1&q nada+nargs+wi
these people print a high proportion of good books http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&q=timberpress
==================and try plums, apricots, grapes! http://www.wils.wisc.edu/~reshaw/books.htm Bennett, Jennifer. The Harrowsmith Book of Fruit Trees. Camden East, Ontario: Camden House Publishing, 1991 a bit out of date, but looked good to me
and http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&q=nafex+nuts+pears
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a great response. I don't remember seeing so many links in one post. Thank you very much!
Ted Shoemaker
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Keep it simple. Don't bite off more than you can chew.
Depending where you are in Wisconsin, visit your country extension office and talk with the master gardener or extension specialist for help. It's free and often they are lonely and want someone to talk with.
Keep your initial planting area small and manageable. Prep the soil, get a soil test... Your plants will respond with years of beauty and pleasure.
Many factors are taken into account before buying plants: daylight, shade, soil, drainage, water. All the plants you list are good and should do fine provided they are given the right growing conditions. A garden isn't just something one does or has. It is something alive and hence requires care. Perennials are good but will need maintenance, too.
Plant grasses and then fill the holes with perennials and surprises. Grasses are trouble-free plants that just do their thing all season long. Some are spectacular in the winter landscape provided Wisconsin ever gets snow again or has winter.
Perennials each have their moment in the garden when they are spectacular. Plan the garden so you always have something happening.
On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 10:56:46 -0800, Ted Shoemaker wrote:

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http://www.jungseed.com/ in wisconsin, grows stuff in zone 4 if they got it, it will grow in zone 4. Ingrid, Milwaukee zone 5

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Looks like you may have a shady area to address. Some of these are annuals and others perennials - annuals are often considered the easiest types of plants for novice gardeners, but IMO they give the least satisfaction as they are so temporary, lasting only for a single season. I'd stick to the cottage type perennials on your list - they tend to be very hardy, require minimal care and perennialize well: - Dicentra/bleeding heart - Campanula/Canterbury Bells - columbine - Tricyrtis/ toadlily - Corydalis lutea - Hardy Geraniums/cranesbill - Myosotis/forget-me-nots - Epimediums - ajuga and vinca as groundcovers
the rest tend to be tender perennials or annuals or are fussy about conditions and climate. Some, like the houttunyia and parthenocissus can be very aggressive and difficult for a new gardener (and experienced, as well) to control.
pam - gardengal

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