Trimming Pin Oaks

Where can I find instructions for the proper way to trim this sensitive tree? My Google searches aren't successful. Every time I try tinkering with the limbs, the entire branch dies... even when I trim at a joint.
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On 7/14/2008 3:03 PM, jaygreg wrote:

In general, oaks should be pruned only to remove dead growth and eliminate crossing branches.
Because my valley white oak (Quercus lobata) has branches extending out over a public street, I must keep it trimmed so that trash trucks and street sweepers can drive under it. The county standard is 12 ft above the pavement. For this, I use a licensed tree specialist.
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David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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In article

If you're pruning lower branches, if the rest of the limb is shaded by higher branches, the shaded branch may well die because it is no longer fed by sufficient length of foliaged branch. Mine's a hardy tree that never needs pruning; I got it as a slim but very tall pot-grown tree and it had lost its lwoer branches from overshading, but has never needed even one bad limb removed since I planted it a few years ago, and it's now much taller than our two-story house. Absolutely care-free tree.
I can't help but wonder if your own limb loss is not from pruning but from the pruning being "one stress too many" and the tree should be checked for insect stress, borer holes, bark cracks; its watering schedule should be measured so as to never be too dry during heat-stressing months (especially a young tree), nor poor drainage in rainy periods. It can have moisture-stress if overwatered or in soil that drains badly; and the soil should not be at all alkaline. When to prune is partly dependent on where you live. Pin oaks generally prefer to be pruned (if at all) in mid-summer or in winter; the leaf development is very active in spring, roots are working doubletime in autumn sucking energy back from the leaves, which is why it stresses them to be pruned spring or autumn -- but check for any different advice specific to where you live. Winter pruning is easiest for really assessing the tree's structure, but summer for assessing which limbs are healthiest.
If it's oozing dark hardening sap at any point it's probably a doomed tree in slow decline, nothing can be done as that's usually pathogenic. If not stressed by any other factors it should be easy to give it a high-summer or winter pruning for shaping purposes without risk of loss of limbs. A maturing tree shouldn't need any pruning, however, unless a limb craps out then it should be removed entirely, or unless it has annoyingly tried to grow with two or three leaders the extras needing removal.
You should check out a library book on pruning if you've any questions; net advice can be iffy, and since my pin oak thrives without any pruning at all, I won't even promise my sense of what's best is guaranteed correct. And there are some niceties of pruning angles and the like that are easiest to understand with a book that has some drawings on the topic.
-pagaht the ratgirl
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On Jul 14, 8:03 pm, snipped-for-privacy@paghat.com (paghat) wrote:

Anyone know of a forum that focuses on growing trees? I doubt if this is rocket science once one knows the general rules of how and when to cut. The 75 foot tree is healthy but some of its lower branches are overhanging the sidewalk and pose a hazard to citizen. Some are also about to touch the roofs of tall vehicles that may enter my driveway from time to time.
Perhaps there is no pattern nor special approach beyond the norm for trimming pin oaks.
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You best bet is http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/TPRUNING.html
The book is called the World Wide Pruning Guide.
http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/tree_pruning/index.html
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Consulting Tree Biologist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss. Some people will buy products they do not understand and not buy books that will give them understanding.

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Jay
GREAT QUESTION!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Also MODERN ARBORICULTURE is a systematic approach to the care of trees. You should treat the system and not just the wound. The book MODERN ARBORICULTURE has large drawings and small amount of lucid words. This should help you make sound decisions on treatments to your tree based on a thorough understanding of tree biology.
Two Books For You. To remove branches correctly takes a understanding of how branches are attached to trees. Your question is a good one and these two books should be in your library or they can get them or just go to www.shigoandtrees.com to order. Suggested Readings on Pruning Roots, Branches and Sprouts as well as other Tree System Treatments of Value (TOP QUALITY)
Pruning is just one treatment. Treatment of the tree system is very important. I suggest MODERN ARBORICULTURE as a guide. When a tree is wounded, you should not treat only the wound but the entire tree. When in doubt about a treatment, go slowly and lightly.
Many tree problems are associated with the following: They are Case Sensitive.
Unhealthy Trees from the Nursery / Improper Planting http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/T/tree_planting.html
Improper Mulching - http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/M/mulch.html
Improper Pruning http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/tree_pruning
Improper Fertilization (See A Touch of Chemistry) http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/CHEM.html
Tree Farming and Related Problems http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/SOUND /
Troubles in the Rhizosphere http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/RHIZO.html
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Consulting Tree Biologist www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss. Some people will buy products they do not understand and not buy books that will give them understanding.

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Sorry, the links WORLDWIDE PRUNING GUIDE http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/TPRUNING.html
MODERN ARBORICULTURE http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/MARBOR.html
Once you have the books you can get help with questions at snipped-for-privacy@treedictionary.com
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John A. Keslick, Jr.
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