Tree ID & Damage Advice

Can someone please ID this tree?
http://www.hildenbrands.com/gallery/temp-files/gallery/tree_id_pic_1.php http://www.hildenbrands.com/gallery/temp-files/gallery/tree_id_pic_2.php
I also need advice on how to treat this chronic bleeding wound. From what the past owner said, it bleeds like that every year.
http://www.hildenbrands.com/gallery/temp-files/gallery/tree_id_pic_3.php http://www.hildenbrands.com/gallery/temp-files/gallery/tree_id_pic_4.php
Click the magnifying glass to zoom if you need a closer look.
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SWAG - elm - does effluent smell, if so, what kind of smell? Suspect internal decay. Location could help.
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Don Staples wrote:

No smell that I can detect though it's not actively bleeding at this moment.
Location is far south western KY, zone 6B.
From a closer look into the wound, it looks like there is a hole, unsure if it's deep or not.
Is there anything I can flush it with? I'm going to pack it with paraffin wax and give it a slight heating to seal it, but I do not want to seal in something bad.
Also, once sealed, is there anything I can use to clean the bark that's been bled all over?
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Trees do not bleed. I.e., if you put blood on your pancakes this morning.
There is wet wood. I would suggest two books on wetwood of trees. Common on elms. http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/MARBOR.html
http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/NTB.html
Wetwood - Wetwood is a term used for both a disease of wood and for the wood, altered as a result of the disease. Wetwood is wood infected by anaerobic bacteria mostly. See "wetwood" http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/W/index.html
Do not use drain tubes to drain wetwood.
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John A. Keslick, Jr.
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symplastless wrote:

So I should just let it alone and not try and seal it or anything?
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Scott
That would be my recommendation. The slim flux does kill bark. Also turf. This is the thing. It's better to have one fox in the hen house than 50 coming in. Wetwood alters the wood to a higher state of protection. It keeps the other bad guys out. Its a niche. Proper mulching and other treatments would be good for your tree.
proper Mulching - http://home.ccil.org/~treeman/sub3.html and http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/M/ Look up "Mulch"
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symplastless wrote:

Thanks.. I've read up on mulching the right way since I was already planning on mulching around that tree and making it more of a showcase since it's right by the main entrance we use for the home.
I did have a Q though.. Couldn't I wax over the hole where it's weeping so I can minimize the bark that's being damaged below it?
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Good question. I do not think so.
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Correction
The outer bark is dead. The slim flux kills micros living on bark. The outer bark is born alive. It uses its energy quickly buying suberin. Without energy it dies.
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Based on the picture given I would say it is an American Elm. Forget the leave the bark is the distinguishing factor. American http://images.google.com/images?svnum &um=1&hl=en&rls=GGLJ%2CGGLJ%3A2005-51%2CGGLJ%3Aen&q=american+elm+bark Chinese http://images.google.com/images?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rls=GGLJ,GGLJ:2005-51,GGLJ:en&q=chinese+elm+bark&um=1&sa=N&tab=wi
Very different bark and growth habit
As for the old pruning cut.....Looks like you have that covered but I would back up John and reccomend leaving it alone. You could do more damage than harm.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

http://images.google.com/images?svnum &um=1&hl=en&rls=GGLJ%2CGGLJ%3A2005-51%2CGGLJ%3Aen&q=american+elm+bark
http://images.google.com/images?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rls=GGLJ,GGLJ:2005-51,GGLJ:en&q=chinese+elm+bark&um=1&sa=N&tab=wi
So it may very well be an American Elm? I'll take a few more pictures if anyone wants more to go by.
As for it being an American Elm do you think anyone would like to use them as propagation plants and harvest the seeds?
I wouldn't mind someone coming by every so often to collect them when they're ready.
Still not 100% sure that it's an American Elm though because the leaves are on the small side, but with the killing frost this year nothing had done well.
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On Oct 3, 3:09 pm, Scott Hildenbrand

http://www.hildenbrands.com/gallery/temp-files/gallery/tree_id_pic_1.phphttp://www.hildenbrands.com/gallery/temp-files/gallery/tree_id_pic_2.php
http://www.hildenbrands.com/gallery/temp-files/gallery/tree_id_pic_3.phphttp://www.hildenbrands.com/gallery/temp-files/gallery/tree_id_pic_4.php
from your pictures it looks like a Chinese Elm.
However, it could MAYBE be an Amereican Elm.
A picture from a greater distance so we can see the whole tree would be useful in identification. Also a picture of the leaves with something (a ruler would be good) that tells us the size of the leaf would also help. Chinese Elms have small leaves of fairly rought texture. American Elms have large leaves that are smooth on the underside.
If it as an American Elm it is worth trying to save as they are very special trees. Those that have survived the Dutch Elm Disease are a hope for restoring them to the American forests.
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