Transplanting tulip bulbs

Now that my tulips have bloomed and gone, I've decided they need to be moved to a more convenient bed. Can the bulbs be transplanted now, any time, or during September or October as if they were just purchased, brand new bulbs?
Thanks,
SRR
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If you just have a few, and don't mind being a bit fussy with them, you can move them now. Use a spade to dig all around them, and lever them up with a lot of dirt around them. The idea is to dig deeply and widely enough that you disturb the roots as little as possible. Put them in their new spot right away, and water them in.
If you have a lot of them to deal with, you can do them anytime after the foliage browns and withers. You can use the withered foliage as a clue for where to dig. You will inevitably spear a few of them despite your best efforts....After you move them, you can water a bit to settle the earth in around them, but no other supplemental watering is necessary for the rest of the summer. Water in the fall, when root growth begins, if you don't have a reasonable amount of rain.
That said, be aware that tulips are chancy endeavor; they don't return reliably like daffodils and hyacinths. Some varieties are more perennial than others, and a lot depends on your climate and weather, but I treat any returning tulips as a bonus, not a given.
Cheers, Sue
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What varieties are more perennial? I've lived in this house for 11 years. The previous owners plantings of tulips came back every year for 10 years. My plantings of tulips lasted no more than 3 seasons tops. The smaller species tulips lasted the longest. So, either they planted true perennial tulips or it took me 10 years to kill them. Thanks
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You could have more fun if you wait until the leaves turn brown:
When you dig up the bulbs to transplant them, you'll find little bulblets. Plant these somewhere you aren't looking for flowers, but the same soil type. When these little bulbs bloom, wait one day and then cut off the flower. It's ok to cut off the whole stem to use in an arrangement. Keep doing this for a few years and your little bulblets will grow into big (read expensive) tulip bulbs. Eventually, the larger bulbs get worn out because they are "wasting" energy making seeds, etc. That's why you have to cut off the flower of the little guys, so they put their energy into the bulb instead of seeds.
Bill

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