Tomato blooms - so many so quickly

I have a cherry tomato plant and a big boy tomato plant, both are about 15" tall now,
They both are getting a lot of blooms already, especially the cherry,
Should I let them continue or should I pull these blooms off now and let the plant get bigger.
Thanks Craig
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I have about 10 tomato plants and the first red tomato from an "Early Girl" will be picked this week. More blooms = more tomatoes to eat, so I would not pull blooms off a tomato plant.
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I presume that the plant has some kind of support or cage. When it gets to the top of its' arbor, cage, or is about 4 ' to 5' tall, pick off the growing tip of the vine. At any time you can start removing all the little suckers that spring up between the branch and the trunk of the vine. Actually, where ever you have a "V" and new growth tries to spring up there, pick it off. Leave the flowers, they are your crop. Get some bone meal worked gently into the soil around the tomatoes as this will help the flowers, fruit, and roots. Do NOT apply any nitrogen, unless you start seeing yellow leaves.
Bon Appetit,
Billy, Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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Craig wrote:

Craig,
That is quite normal (especially with cherry tomatoes). Let the blooms alone. Depending on the weather and the bees not all of them will set tomatoes. If you do get too many tomatoes you can always give the extras to the neighbors (that is what we do).
--
Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

Gardening for over 40 years
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Or call your local food kitchens/senior citizen homes and ask if they want them. Most will GLADLY take fresh food in season.
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I won't assume here. Answer depends on your end purpose. Most people, its the fruit, the tomato, they are looking for. Your's may be different. Waiting... Dave
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Let 'em grow. They know what to do -- they'll keep producing. Keep the soil moisture level fairly constant -- don't let them go dry, and don't use a fertilizer high in N.
Kay
.
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Thanks for the replies, I was just wondering since this seemed unusual here in CO.
Seems they usually dont start blooming until July, maybe with June rains they acted normal, been so long since we had a moderately wet spring.
Even though we actually had a light frost the other morning, I only saw frost on the roofs and it was in the mid 30s. The airport had an actual freeze at 31 F. Latest freeze ever.
Okay I will be happy and let them bloom away, Like I said though, it just seemed unusual for me here.
Thanks again
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