So far so good

  Put all my tomato seedlings in the ground yesterday using the "posthole" method . Used  my post hole digger to make the holes , worked great . So far , they all look pretty good , nobody is layin' on the ground wailing for a safe place or a coloring book ... Looks like Tuesday will be my next opportunity to plant seedlings , it got rainy . Temps are pretty decent though , which is what helped me decide to plant the 'maters .
--
Snag
Ain't no dollar sign on
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Terry Coombs wrote:

still too cold here at night. but the trend is finally nice enough. tomorrows forecast is for 70F and sunny. Tuesday rain. all night-time temperatures are above 34F for the next week for first time this spring. if i get another two weeks of gradual warming i may risk planting some peas.
in all of the years of transplanting tomatoes i don't recall losing many, if any at all. they seem to be pretty hardy plants as long as it doesn't get too cold.
songbird
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/22/2018 7:26 PM, songbird wrote:

  I watch the forecast closely now . One year I took it for granted the "last frost date" was gospel . Planted based on that date and all my tomatoes got frosted . Had to replace about a third of them with store bought <shudder> seedlings . I did buy some seedlings this year , but my source is all heirloom and minimal chemicals . On another note , I have a partial roll of stock fencing that in conjunction with the 3 fence posts I have left over should make a pretty nice trellis for those greasy beans . I think this year I'm going to set up something for the field peas to climb instead of letting them ramble all over the ground . I still haven't got everything mapped out where what goes , gotta work on that , make sure I still have room .
--
Snag
Ain't no dollar sign on
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/22/2018 9:02 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

We are still rebuilding our raised beds, but almost done. One of them fell apart, so had to move the dirt in it and build it better this time. Thus far my husband is growing veggies via hydroponics, and he actually has about 5 squash fruit on one plant that is growing indoors under lights and in water. The squash bugs always end up killing our plants before we get fruit off of it when we plant squash outside, so, maybe we'll get to actually eat some fresh homegrown squash this year!
--
Maggie

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sunday, April 22, 2018 at 10:00:58 PM UTC-4, Terry Coombs wrote:

worked

.
nt

the

Try using safety fencing from your local builders supply. It's plastic, ine xpensive, & usually lasts several seasons. The only real issue is having to pick both sides of the trellis.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/23/2018 8:50 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

  But then I'd have to go out and buy something . I see no reason to do that since I have materials on hand . I also have part of a roll of 6x6 concrete reinforcing wire - bought to build tomato cages - that I plan on using for field peas or maybe the greasy beans . Helps that I have a pretty complete machine/welding shop ... makes many projects easy that otherwise would be basically impossible or extremely difficult .
--
Snag
Ain't no dollar sign on
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    Bummer; people don't still say that, do they? hmmm. Sadly, "average" doesn't mean _this year_; sigh.... I've been bit by "March surprises" more than one year down here in FL, even. When hanging fire on "early" planting, I generally wait until the overnight low has been above the target temperature for at least ten days or two weeks, or so just "because". Hard to do sometimes. Right now, I have some provider snap beans that were planted beneath blooming mustard greens in late February but late March freezing temperatures took out a number of plants. Those sites were re-seeded on March 26. At any rate, most survived; I'm picking from them daily now and before week's end I expect them to be sheltering their replacements.

    For many years, I provided poles (local bamboo) for the peas and those spaced as necessary to allow three or four vines per pole. This year, however, I simply am going to place one of the wire field fencing structures used by the English peas and cucumbers in the bed with the peas and see how well the peas accomodate wire. Peas do not attach via tendrils, in the manner of English peas or grapes, but wrap their stems helically around support structures. 'Til now, I've always used purely vertical supports (the bamboo poles) and whether the horizontal elements of the fence wire affect the plants remains to be seen. Foot: For all I know the plants may be repelled by metal or, at least, may not attach themselves to it.     I also have on hand–but rarely use–trellis fashioned from the 6" wire reinforcing fabric to which you refer elsewhere. Aside from being initially more difficult to bend into the desired shape, the wire breaks easily with repeated bending, or so it seems to me.
--
Derald
Peninsular FL, USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/23/2018 6:29 PM, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

  I made the mistake of planting field peas next to my tomato cages 2 years ago . They'll climb metal just fine . Tomatoes weren't happy about their sunlight getting cut off , got way tall and spindly , lousy for production .

  The re-wire is pretty high in carbon , will fatigue and crack/break faster than say field fencing wire . If I use that stuff I'll cut it into panels about 30" wide and bend the ends of the wires into loops to hinge them together . That will let me zigzag the panels to make them self-supporting . Probably drive a post about the middle anyway just for insurance .
--
Snag
Ain't no dollar sign on
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    I only have one trellis made from re-wire, of which we have a fair amount left over from construction projects. Been sitting in the back yard for at least thirty. One might say we basically don't use it for anything.     At any rate, all of the materials are salvage, much of the fencing obtained with posts attached. I roll the fence fabric to the length equal to the desired height of the trellis and cut off what becomes essentially a panel which, when rotated so that the normally horizontal wires ("lines") are vertical and the wrapped normally vertical wires ("stays") are horizontal and allow easy rotation at 6" intervals. The sections, especially when zigged and zagged across a bed, are self-supporting. I locate the bottoms with tent pegs and reave arbitrary lengths of ¾-inch thin-wall PVC pipe through the fence fabric (at whatever intervals look "right"), sinking them as deeply as possible into the Earth in order to provide some resistance to wind. The sections roll or fold to reduce storage space needed.     Often, I simply overlap the panels, securing them to each other with PVC rove through the fabric but in past years have fastened them together with SS wire or with wire ties—those yellow jobbies from Baggies.     If the horizontal lines are cut midway between the wrapped vertical stays, it is easy enough to fashion the cut-off ends into hooks and loops so that the pieces may serve a variety of other purposes.
--
Derald
Peninsular FL, USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Terry Coombs wrote: ...

we started talking yesterday about what we want to plant where. i never really know exactly what will happen because what we plan on getting and what we end up with can often change.
finally going to see some 70s this coming week.
songbird
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/25/2018 5:27 AM, songbird wrote:

I planted most of the center section yesterday . Four rows about 2 feet apart and 40 feet long , one is half white greasy beans and half red rippers , a third of the other three are given over to vine stuff , one was finished out with all the peppers and two have 2/3 left for later stuff . Okra for instance won't germ until it warms up more , and I'm not sure what else I'll plant .
--
Snag
Ain't no dollar sign on
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Terry Coombs wrote: ...

i sure hope the beans work out well for you down there. :)
do you measure soil temperatures at all?
i do, in that i stick my finger in the dirt once in a while to see how cold it is. :)
i have nine new varieties to trial this season including a single bean and am pretty nervous about planting it since it will be the only chance i get at this one this season. i have some wire mesh to go around it to protect it from groundhogs/chipmunks/rabbits even if it is going to be inside the fenced area there is always a chance of a critter finding a way in. i'd like to be able to get it to a few feet tall and the wire mesh i have will do that for me.
we drove up north yesterday to pick up some stuff and there is still snow on the ground and some of the lakes are still frozen over.
when working on my project out back the other day the hole still had some snow at the bottom from the storm we had last week.
i'm not sure what i'm up to today out there, i have a pile of old wooden pallets to bust apart and pull out the nails (don't like finding those the hard way later on).
songbird
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.