Long Term Gardening

Last fall, we gathered several pails of black walnuts at a friend's farm. S
he has several large trees, which produce more nuts than she can use. I pla
nted 32 in the back row of the garden and eight in seed trays but nothing h
as sprouted. I would have expected at least a few of the 40 planted to prod
uce trees, as that's what nuts are for, at least from the point of view of
the trees.
Paul
Reply to
Pavel314
She has several large trees, which produce more nuts than she can use. I p lanted 32 in the back row of the garden and eight in seed trays but nothing has sprouted. I would have expected at least a few of the 40 planted to pr oduce trees, as that's what nuts are for, at least from the point of view o f the trees.
Could be that squirrels got them.
Reply to
peek0703
Maybe not planted correctly as I see husks should be removed first:
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Takes decades to get mature producing trees, I see also.
I'm now contending with many type trees I planted over 40 years ago.
My Chinese chestnuts are mature and I get far more than I need. There is a weevil problem I cannot eradicate and local market would not buy them. I'll have friends over to pickup what they want. OP lucky to have one that gives him nuts.
My experiment in trying to grow English walnuts failed. Squirrels would eat the nuts green off the trees and we got essentially none. Then wind took its toll and blew them down. I had last one removed last month.
Reply to
Frank
rm. She has several large trees, which produce more nuts than she can use. I planted 32 in the back row of the garden and eight in seed trays but noth ing has sprouted. I would have expected at least a few of the 40 planted to produce trees, as that's what nuts are for, at least from the point of vie w of the trees.
Not sure about removing the husks. These trees are native to the area and g row in the wild, where nobody removes their husks. Maybe the squirrels remo ve them?
Reply to
Pavel314
Husks flake off easily sometime after they have fallen and then squirrels often bury nuts. That's why I was surprised that squirrels were going after my green on the tree English walnuts.
I saw a squirrel eating a black walnut once and it must have taken a half hour. Good thing their teeth keep growing as it took a lot of gnawing. Squirrels probably go after the easy nuts first, like acorns, then as food gets scarce go for things like black walnuts and Osage Orange. Same with deer getting my ivy in the winter. Ivy is easy to get but probably not as tasty as my chestnuts.
Reply to
Frank
In article Pavel314 writes:
Be aware that Black Walnut interferes with lots of common garden plants. The roots (and other parts) emit a substance called juglone that reduces respiration.
If you want to garden near them, do some research as to which plants are affected.
My vegetable garden is about 8 feet from a 2.5 foot wide walnut stump (felled 4-6 years back). That side is still questionable for tomatoes. It may remain so for another 20 years.
Reply to
Drew Lawson
Thanks for the warning. I plan to transplant any that sprout to locations far from the garden.
Paul
Reply to
Pavel314

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