Sudden infestation with this yellow flowered low-leaved tall gangly plant

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Danny D. wrote:

That must be the ultimate place to take out your frustrations on! :D
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On Fri, 28 Jun 2013 11:22:07 -0500, Natural - Smoking Gun - Girl wrote:

Well, it's 500 yards of poison oak jungle! I'm the only one who ever goes there (I wonder why). It's very peaceful. The birds like me because I hacked out a trail,and they were right behind me, eating the bugs that I had to dig out of the steep hillside with my gas cultivator in tow.
Note: Using a cultivator on a steep hillside of poison oak was when I got the worst case yet. Something about chewing up poison oak vines in the tines got the stuff on me, no matter how hard I tried to dress for success.
Here you can see one of the "momma vines" which was about as big as they get in my ravine, where it's just oozing with enough urushiol sap to infect every human on earth!

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Danny D. said:

My brother would freak just thinking about such giant poison oak plants. As a kid, he spent much of one summer indoors due to an extreme reaction (that required medical intervention and injections). He can get a rash just walking by a patch. As the older sib I had to learn to identify poison ivy and point it out. All these years later, it's still automatic for me to ID poison ivy, oak, or sumac to anyone nearby. I am amazingly good at spotting it.
Oh, an good on you for relocating rather than eliminating the snakes and such. Though I don't think I'd be as kind to the black widows. I only rescue jumping spiders. I sometimes rescue the crab spiders that come in on flowers. The rest get squished.
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Pat in Plymouth MI

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On Mon, 01 Jul 2013 07:47:19 -0400, Pat Kiewicz wrote:

I understand what you mean, as I am always identifying it for the grandkids, who wander by oblivious to all harm.
Nobody is immune to cell-mediated immune responses (since the T-Cell are randomly generated and passed by the Thymus), but some people just haven't (randomly) gotten it yet. Or, they haven't gotten enough of a dose that their T-Cells wandered by a urushiol quinone which has bound to a receptor site on a Langerhans cell in their skin.
NOTE: Contact dermatitis is NOT mediated by humoral antigen/antibody responses, so, all the conventional wisdom of "being immune" goes out the door.
In the case of the amount of sap in that picture, almost nobody on earth would not respond to that amount, were it to touch skin (keeping in mind, the urushiol oil is known to stay active over 100 years in dendrology drawers) and probably 10 years in my relatively dry climate.
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Danny D. said:

I've never gotten a rash from poison ivy, even when (as a kid) I was dared to rub a leaf on my skin, or when I've pulled seedlings out bare-handed. My dad's side of the family, very vigorous reactors. My mother never has, if I recall correctly.
Which is sort of odd, as both my mother and I have had serious reactions to other chemicals and adhesives. I've had at least one quite serious case of photoallergic dermatitis which required (unpleasant) steroid therapy and I have to carefully read labels to avoid certain preservatives and also avoid sun-screens other than zinc oxide. I mainly rely on sun protective clothing and hats, which means long sleeves and long pants no matter how hot it is. (Coolibar makes some clever items, but it's still easy to overheat.)

That I could believe.
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Pat in Plymouth MI

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In article

I'm the same with poison oak, but my understanding is that this can change without notice.

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Remember Rachel Corrie
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On 6/27/2013 12:27 PM, Danny D. wrote:

Cool, macro-photography. My cheap Vivitar digital camera had a Macro setting. ^_^
TDD
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On Thu, 27 Jun 2013 21:48:01 -0700, Roy wrote:

OK. I'll start putting the 640x480 pictures there.
If anyone wants the larger ones, they'll need to know to substitute "img" for "640" to get the zoomable details.
PS: They both (big or small) load fine for me, and my Internet comes in through 15 miles of air to an antenna on my roof via WiFi. It was a bear to set up, but, now it's working (for all but for the VOIP - which has jitter that's too high. Sigh.)
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Kay Lancaster wrote: ...

yes, but once you get a cover crop growing which shades the area the mustard will have a much harder time taking over again, if you can keep at it for a few seasons you can effectively eliminate it other than having to spot weed a few times a season. that's still much less time i spend in this one garden than i used to (when it was full of weeds and the soil was much poorer).
now i actually let a few mustard plants grow and bloom (but not scatter seeds) because we like the early yellow flowers.
songbird
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Ignore Kay at your own peril.
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Billy wrote:

i'm well aware...
http://www.anthive.com/flowers/100_5167_Yellow_Spiral.jpg
that was a picture from few years ago.
this year i've only had to pull a few plants out of that same patch. the seeds are still there -- if i were to return the area to bare dirt i'd have them attempt to take over again.
the roots are quite tough, if you don't get all of them they'll resprout. the good news though is that the plant doesn't grow all that fast as compared to many others. checking once a month has been good enough (after they've done their spring-time flowering). i keep clipping them off and letting them lay as compost. the few that do resprout don't grow much at all, they can't get much light through the trefoil or alfalfa.
songbird
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On Wed, 26 Jun 2013 02:01:03 +0000, Kay Lancaster wrote:

Thanks for that information.
Here's a picture of the underside of the wild mustard flower:

Is the green arrow pointing to a (football-shaped) sepal?
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Looks more like a petal that hasn't completely colored up yet. But that's really hard to tell in a photo.
If you look at sepals and petals on almost all flowers, you'll find that each series of flower parts are in whorls -- multiple parts all coming out at the same level. So the lowest series is the sepals. Let's say in an opened out mustard flower, they're laid out like a + sign. The next whorl is petals, and if the sepals are laid out like a + sign, the petals will be an X. Then there will be 4 stamens, laid out like a + and two more like two arms of the X, and finally in the middle, the two chambers of the ovary, the two carpels joined together to form a single fruit.
http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20p?img=I_MWS95452&res=mx is a pretty good view of the flower of a different species of mustard from the side... in this case, both the sepals and petals are yellow, but different shapes, and you can also see the four long stamens and two shorter ones most of the mustards have.
http://www.plantbiology.siu.edu/PLB304/Lecture09FloralMor/images/FlowerGeneral.jpg and
http://www.tsflowers.com/lilyphotos/Lily_Stargazer2.jpg is a lily flower straight on, and you can see the different shapes of the sepals, the narrower "petals" and the wider petals. Unfortunately, it's not a good photo of the stamens or ovary, but I'll take what I can get here. <g>
And yes, I can rattle on for hours about flower parts and how to interpret what you're seeing... it's one of the major tools for plant identification, once you get beyond pure recognition of different species.
Kay
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It looks very much like a member of the mustard family. Maybe Wintercress aka Barbarea. Count the petals on the flower. If there are Four petals on each flower, it is a mustard.
Emilie NorCal
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On Sun, 23 Jun 2013 20:17:35 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

We've a new weed infestation this year here in northern NJ. I have assumed it came in with Superstorm Sandy last fall, as it is ubiquitous this spring/summer and I have never seen it before, or surely never did in any great numbers such that it made an impression on me.
Anyway, check out field hawkweed photos and see if they match. That is what seems to be all over the sides of the roads here now.
Boron
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On Sunday, June 23, 2013 1:17:35 PM UTC-7, Danny D. wrote:

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On Sunday, June 23, 2013 1:17:35 PM UTC-7, Danny D. wrote:

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You need goats, lots of goats.
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