Steppable Mosses?

While browsing the web I found a picture of something I would like to try. The person had taken irish moss and made circles on a path to form 'stepping stones' with white pebbles around the moss circles. I'm in Northern Viginia, zone 5, and have tried to grow irish moss in two places with no success. Is there another 'steppable' moss that would do the same thing? Or would what I'm describing not even be worth the time?
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Ig.Gardener

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On 4/29/11 7:06 PM, Ig.Gardener wrote:

Irish moss is not really a moss. It's a flowering plant, Sagina subulata. While it will take some foot traffic, it really will not take the constant traffic of a frequently used path. Actually, it will do better between stepping stones than as something on which to step.
Irish moss requires conditions quite different from true moss. It requires good soil, good drainage, and full or part sun.
Very similar to Sagina subulata in both appearance and culture is Aremaria verna, which is also called Irish moss. Both are sometimes called Scotch moss. Both are hardy to around 5F but will also thrive in mild-winter climates; however, neither will survive the heat and low humidity of a desert.
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David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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Irish moss is not really a moss. It's a flowering plant, Sagina subulata. While it will take some foot traffic, it really will not take the constant traffic of a frequently used path. Actually, it will do better between stepping stones than as something on which to step.
Irish moss requires conditions quite different from true moss. It requires good soil, good drainage, and full or part sun.
Very similar to Sagina subulata in both appearance and culture is Aremaria verna, which is also called Irish moss. Both are sometimes called Scotch moss. Both are hardy to around 5F but will also thrive in mild-winter climates; however, neither will survive the heat and low humidity of a desert.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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The only non-grass ground cover that I think will take some foot traffic is dichondra. D. micrantha (aka D. repens) is hardy to about 20F, but walking on it in freezing weather will leave dead footprints.
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--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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