squirrels, again

Page 1 of 2  
Another young, green tomato on the deck yesterday morning. Not how I like to start the day... I had been lax with the vinegar soaked rags. Been raining a lot and that dilutes it. I will have to redouble my efforts... Or, where do I get some Red-Tailed Hawks? (I don't think coyotes or foxes exist where I live, in the city.)
"Ground Squirrels are active during the day and the nocturnal Barn Owl will not help with a squirrel problem. However, in areas of infestation, you can erect a substantial post of 20-25 feet in height to provide a perch from which hawks will hunt during the day. Red-Tailed Hawks in particular will hunt ground squirrels. If your vineyard is enclosed in deer fencing, you may wish to cut several coyote sized holes in the bottom of your fence to allow easy access for coyote, bobcat and fox. These animals are very good at hunting ground squirrels and rabbits. If you are concerned about these predators chewing drip lines, place a few pans underneath your drip lines to collect water for their use during the dry months." http://www.hungryowl.org/services/vineyards.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Please don't feed wild animals, it's a very bad idea.
The fact that it won't help with your vegetable garden, but make the problem worse is another issue.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes:

I have heard of some people planting tomatoes, etc in another part of their yard and leaving that for the squirrels etc. Is that so very different? Though it just seems like a bad idea, and I would attract more, and a larger population than there should be.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Same basic idea. Might work for a little while, but I doubt it.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/27/2013 8:32 AM, Gus wrote:

I've had problems this year and put out the old Havahart trap. Caught and released 6 squirrels before I caught the real culprit, a raccoon who now lives in a more affluent neighborhood.
I advise buying the biggest Havahart trap as the largest raccoons can escape without it latching. Peanut butter is universal bait, I've caught squirrels, raccoons and groundhogs with it - once even a bird and a skunk.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 27 Jul 2013 15:32:04 -0400, Frank

I live on severl rual acres surrounded by thosands of rural acres... there aren't enough hava-a-heart traps on the planet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

New ones will just move in... My NIL cousin has four acres in the country and has killed 43 squirrels this year. They've gotten into his wiring and caused lots of damage besides just stealing tomatoes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gus said:

front of the house (and collected the corpse for My Daughter the Zoologist).
By noon, and through the rest of the day, there were at least three male squirrels chasing, fighting, biting, tail-flicking, growling and sqealing their way around our yard. Apparently the Capo di tutti capi squirrel snuffing it left a power vaccuum. They must have settled things in short order--the next day everything was back to normal.
(Squirrels are excluded from the vegetable garden during the growing season by a carefully reinforced fence with a charge wire at the top.)
--
Pat in Plymouth MI

"Yes, swooping is bad."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/27/2013 8:54 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:

I live in a semi-rural area too. Figure I just remove the creatures that are bothering me and it will take a while for others to take their place. Since my trapping venture over a week ago, I have not seen a squirrel since.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 07/27/2013 05:32 AM, Gus wrote:

Hi Gus,
Try modifying this Red Neck Mouse Trap for squirrels. A metal trash can should suffice. Fill the bottom with RV radiator fluid.
Here are the instructions: http://www.instructables.com/id/Redneck-Mouse-Trap/
Here it is in action: http://giggletime.thoughts.com/posts/giggle-time-redneck-mousetrap
Anyone who viewed the second link, JUST TRY AND TELL ME YOU DIDN'T LAUGH!
-T
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/29/2013 1:06 AM, Todd wrote:

Just as I walked into my family room a couple of winters ago, I heard a snap trap go off in the adjacent utility room.
Getting trap and mouse, I decided to flush him rather than open the door to the cold.
He splashed into the bowl and revived, desperately trying to escape, so I flushed him.
He now resides in my septic system with a diet of stink bugs ;)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wonder how long a mouse can survive? I had one in a trap in a brown paper bag once in the morning and assumed it was dead, but was running late for work and so decided to deal with it after work... When I got home, the trap was empty.
A little off topic, but apropos to the revival of the mouse but regarding humans:
"What happens when we die - wouldn't we all like to know? We can't bring people back from the dead to tell us but in some cases, we almost can. Resuscitation medicine is now sometimes capable of reviving people after their hearts have stopped beating and their brains have flat lined."
"[Dr. Sam Parnia:] So today when we define someone as being dead, we look at those three criteria - no heartbeat, no respirations, and we check the pupils of the eye for a reflex that when it's absent, it tells us that the brain stem and the brain is no longer functioning. The person is motionless - and they're dead, and we define them as dead.
However, what we've now discovered - in the past decade or so - is that actually, it's only after a person dies. So in other words, when someone has actually reached that point and they've become a corpse, that the cells inside the body start to undergo their own process of death, and that the period in which the cells die is variable depending on the organs, but it certainly goes on to hours of time.
So for instance, brain cells will die at about eight hours; again, there is some variation, but around eight hours after a person has died. And therefore, our work in resuscitation science is to try to study the processes that are going on in a person after they've died, but before they've reached the point of complete, irreversible and irretrievable cell damage such that no matter what we do, we can't bring them back.
And if we manage to restore oxygen and nutrients back to those cells before they've reached that point, we are able to successfully bring someone back to life. And that's why today, with numerous advances that have taken place in the field of resuscitation science, we have managed to push back that boundary to well beyond the 10-, 20-minute time frame that had been perceived in the past, into many hours of death."
http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId 2495667
'With today's medicine, we can bring people back to life up to one, maybe two hours, sometimes even longer, after their heart stopped beating and they have thus died by circulatory failure. In the future, we will likely get better at reversing death.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2381442/Dr-Sam-Parnia-claims-corpses-soon-revived-24-hours-death.html
"He [Sam Parnia] specializes in people who survive cardiac arrest. Eighty to 90 percent of these patients do not have stories of bright lights, tunnels, out-of-body experiences and luminous beings." http://www.npr.org/2013/02/21/172495667/resuscitation-experiences-and-erasing-death
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/30/2013 6:53 PM, Gus wrote:

for a while and just got a stinking carcass. Poison inside the house can also lead to stink. Glue traps are torture. I've seen them gnaw off a leg to try to escape. As I discovered, the snap traps may not just break their neck but suffocate them. Still preferred to suffering in other traps.
I believe life span of mice and rats is about 3 years and most that don't suffer predation, expire of cancer. Mice are used to test chemical toxicity as they do not have a throw-up mechanism. The chemicals are injected down their throats with a blunt syringe.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank wrote: ...

funny name for turds.
songbird
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/30/2013 8:06 PM, songbird wrote:

Haven't the stink bugs made it to your area yet? If not, you're in for a real treat.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We have them here in central NJ.
I don't mind them at all, but my only contact with them is that I find 3 or 4 a year inside the house, especially in the winter.
I pick them up and put them outside but don't crush them.
I've read that the problem is that you can see a LOT of them. I haven't experienced that.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes:

I get an occasional black beetle in my basement, they seem to be just passing through and generally don't seem to be a bother. Haven't seen any lately, but crickets come down here too. They are kind of funny hopping around unpredictably. I'm not sure why the come down here, not much to see or eat. No food in the basement.
The worse bug problem to have is bedbugs. I would not wish those on my worse enemy. What a f***ing nightmare.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank wrote: ...

i'm not sure. do you have a good picture reference for them?
i was just making a bit of a joke. :) good earthy humor is never far away around here.
songbird
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/31/2013 2:17 PM, songbird wrote:

I see they first showed up in Allentown, Pa in 1998:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_marmorated_stink_bug
I quit growing peppers a couple of years ago as they were mottling the peppers and they were small.
Hopefully a natural predator will set in and keep them in check.
They are funny coming into the house when fall sets in and leaving in the spring.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank wrote: ...

i've not seen too many of those here. we have something a bit longer and skinny (similar otherwise) that we call a squash bug, but perhaps it is the same bug.

i've never seen the type of damage to peppers as described in the wiki article. we don't grow fruits other than strawberries.

plenty of them around in the spring and fall, but the rest of the summer i don't see them much at all.

that is what these do too.
they stink like green apples when overly disturbed.
i'll have to capture one and get a good picture to compare.
songbird
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.