snow damaged new zealand flax? fix?

have a couple of very big nz flax plants
got snowed on this week and a lot of the exterior leaves got leveled
got the snow off them asap but they are still down
any thoughts about them, the leaves, springing back upright?
any help?
thought about running a rope all around the plants to give them a temp lift?
what is the physical mechanics going on here?
thanks
bill
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Not sure what your experience might be, but my recollection is that Phormium hybrids, like 'Sundowner', 'Apricot Queen', 'Maori Maiden' can't stand temperatures below about 20 F.
I'd probably do what I could to protect the growing crowns, including tying leaves up over them.
Gregg Catanese www.sprinklerplus.com

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Exactly where on the planet are you?
Are you trying to grow them where they normally don't survive the winter?
Most Phormium cultivars cannot tolerate freezing temperatures.

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They are reliably winter hardy to zone 8, 20F. Many of the hybrid cultivars (with P. cookianum parentage) are somewhat hardier, specially if drainage is very good. These originate from high mountainous, even alpine, areas of NZ and can tolerate quite a lot of cold weather.
pam - gardengal
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What you say is true. Phormium cookianum ssp. cookianum occurs in the highest altitude regions of New Zealand and would be the most tolerant of cold. The problem is identifying the cultivars of Phormium cookianum ssp. cookianum that are specifically the most cold hardy. Much experimental testing for cold hardiness needs to be done. An effort should be made to produce improved cold hardy cultivars.
There are many Phormium cultivars in the trade but most of them, especially those of P.tenax, would not be expected to be cold hardy.
http://www.houseleeks.freeserve.co.uk/phormium.htm
Wardle, P. (1979) VARIATION IN PHORMIUM COOKIANUM (AGAVACEAE). New Zealand Journal of Botany 17 (2): 189-196.

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pac nw
well they have survived at least 10 winters and i know it has been in the 20's every now and then for periods of time
spent 2+ hours yesterday ropping and belting up the leaves and cutting dead leaves off the bottom
left it bundled up
good idea or bad?
only did it to one of the plants
plan/theory is to gradually release the ropes over a couple weeks hoping that this will restore the uprightness
good or bad idea?
bill
On Mon, 12 Jan 2004 04:55:02 GMT, "Cereoid-UR12-"

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You still haven't answered the question you were asked, stubborn Billybob.
Exactly where on the planet are you?
How about telling us which USDA hardiness zone you are in too?
**************
Bundling up the leaves is a bad idea and a waste of time. The ropes rigmarole is a waste of time.
It is far more important to protect the rootstock from cold. Try mulching the plants instead.

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seattle
about 200 feet from puget sound
On Mon, 12 Jan 2004 22:06:46 GMT, "Cereoid-UR12-"

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