Sevile Oranges

Anybody know where I can get some Sevile oranges? I live in Pennsylvania and will pay to have shipped..
l8r Jack Hill
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http://www.floridaorangeshop.com/Seville-Oranges_p_183.html
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On 1/18/2010 1:54 PM, Jack wrote:

There was an article about Seville oranges in last Wednesday's Los Angeles Times "Food" section. See <http://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo-sourorange13-2010jan13,0,3867910.story .
If you just want to buy the fruit, see <http://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo-sourbox13-2010jan13,0,1264793.story .
If you want to grow the plant, you live in the wrong area. Among citrus, Seville oranges are relatively hardy. That means they are much more hardy than limes, somewhat more hardy than sweet oranges, and slightly less hardy than kumquats. They might grow in Sunset zone 8 where winter temperatures from 29F down to 13F, corresponding to USDA zones 8 and 9. I suspect that they would not thrive at that lower temperature (13F) since kumquats are hardy only down to 18F. In any case, your winters in Pennsylvania (USDA zones 5 and 6) are too cold for any citrus, with temperatures from 0F down to -20F.
If you want fruit, winter temperatures are important because many seasonal citrus ripen in the late fall and early winter. Freezing weather before or while fruit is ripening will damage the fruit and might make it inedible (not toxic, just not useful).
Citrus does poorly as house plants and will generally not flower or bear fruit indoors except in a climate-controlled greenhouse. Indoors, they need 50% relative humidity and strong light through a window. Although they must be kept from freezing, they must also be kept a good distance from radiators, furnace registers, and other sources of heating.
Longwood Gardens in southern Pennsylvania has (or did have) an orangery in its huge conservatory. You might inquire there about growing Seville oranges.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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Thanks all -- I make jams and jellies and sell at the local farmer's markets and I have had seveal requests for marmalade made from seville oranges. I know I can't grow them here, but since I am only 15 miles from Longwood gardens, who knows...
Thanks to all who took the time to reply
Jack Hill Jacks jams and jellies www.jacks-jams.com
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I've just been making Seville-orange marmalade today. The season for finding them on sale here is short, only 6 to 8 weeks.
Janet (Scotland).
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