Seed stratification using ice when it's already in the ground?

I planted a lot of Swamp Milkweed seeds 3 weeks ago for our butteryfly garden here in Southern California. I didn't realize until now that these seeds require 1 month of stratification in the refrigerator. The temperature here has been hovering around 40F to 55F.
Is it too late to save these seeds from permanent dormancy? I was thinking about possibly spreading ice on top of the soil each evening for a week in a last attempt to allow the seeds to get the right signals to start sprouting.
I wouldn't be able to get new seeds and re-plant, I am just wondering if spreading ice would be of any help as a last chance, or a wasted effort since the seeds have already been moist in the ground for 3 weeks.
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Are they planted in such a way that you could get under them with a trowel, put the accompanying soil into a container, freeze the container and then replant? I mean, if they were in the first 1-3 inches of soil, you could probably snag a lot of them.
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That is a good creative idea.

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wrote:

If you let ice melt every night on the soil you will keep the seeds way too wet. If you can dig out the whole spot where you planted them and put them in the fridge for a month it may help. I never had an easy time with milkweed from seed. Most wildflowers really do need to germinate. They fall off or pods open in late summer and they lay on top of the soil for the winter, only sinking in the soil as it rains. You may want to search online for plants as I think you will have a real shot at it that way.
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I just bought some heritage seeds the other day and I swear I saw someone mention that one of them needed stratification to bloom but the instructions in the packet never mentioned it. Now I'm worried about what I bought and whether or not they need stratification.
Do any of these need to spend the month in the 'fridge:
Bread Seed Poppy Marshmallow Balsam African Marigold Money Plant Luffa Gourd
??
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wrote:
in

FW Most of those I find nothing regarding cold treatment. They are mainly annuals that come from warm places and wouldn't be likely to overwinter in cold. In fact, they need to be planted out _after_ all danger of frost. Marsh Mallow, hard to find information, it grows as a wildflower, but isn't native to US. Scientific name Althea officinalis (aha,found it in my Rodale Herb book) moist soil, full sun, easily grown from seed, cuttings, rootstock. Very cold hardy; nothing about stratification. Hey, a good plant to grow with your mint!! Emilie NorCal
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<HEE>
Thanks, Emilie!
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The swamp milkweed actually likes the soil to be really wet, so wouldn't it be ok if the ice melts on top of it? The part I am not sure about is whether it is too late for stratification treatment after I have already exposed the seeds to the mild-warm and wet winter environment for 3 weeks. The temps here have been 55F-65F lately. Would there be anything else to consider about ice treatment besides the wetness? Would it be a waste or worth a try?
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