Roundup - how far travel?

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Lynch her;-)
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Billy
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Glysophate does not travel. It is a contact, indiscriminate herbicide which will kill most all plants with the exception of perhaps nutsedge. If you read the label before using it, you will see it gives instructions very specifically about how to use it, what herbicide drift is, etc. I am not sure what you mean by "...the middle between bushes, will it hurt them?"
The spray must contact the weed you are looking to control and has absolutely no residual properties in the soil to kill weeds. Maybe you can ask your question differerntly.
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I made a few experimental shields to use with RoundUp on the lawn. Just about every time the surrounding grass died when the application was sprayed. However, if I used a paint brush I could selectively kill a weed without affecting the surrounding plants or grass. Using a paint brush eliminates the chance of overspray, plus less product is used. The downside is that this method is time-consuming, but beats hand pulling weeds. RoundUp changes chemistry when it hits the ground and it should be mixed up in a clean container.
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wrote:

What do you mean about "changing chemistry"? Anxious to learn.
Persephone
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wrote:

Thanks for reassurance about travel.
I am definitely NOT planning to spray, as the rosebushes are only about 2-3 ft. apart, and would be affected by spray. I was planning to apply the Roundup topically, directly to the crab grass. A polite poster mentioned painting it on. An impolite poster had another opinion.
In the end, as I posted above, I didn't get the Roundup at Home Despot, but instead bought what the clerk recommended for spot work: Ortho garden grass killer, which shouts on its label "Won't Harm Landscape Plants!"
Will try it and see how it works.
Appreciate your feedback.
Persephone
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On Mon, 02 Jun 2008 15:38:25 -0700, Persephone wrote:

Many thanks to the kind (mostly!) posters who offered help. Your experience & advice appreciated.
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On Wed, 04 Jun 2008 19:55:31 -0700, Persephone wrote:

There is nothing kind about using poison or supporting monsatano or any of the other purveyors of death with even one penny or moment of consideration. I don't give a fat baby's ass if you consider me unkind or not.....quit poisoning my nest!!!
Charlie
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Charlie wrote in

how do you remove poison ivy? if not glyphospate painted on cut stems, then how? i hate Roundup, but the poison ivy has to go... is there a better way than cutting the vines & painting the stumps with glyphospate?
lee
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wrote:

What did people do before glysophate? How did the earth turn back then? I mean, do what you want, but there are other methods and if you have the Internet in your house you have a world library to search through.
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On a small scale. I keep an eye out and mark new plants. Wait for a few back to back rainy days. Then dress to cover. Slowly pull the plant out trying not to leave rootlets. This is placed in a black trash bag. Followed by a good shower. Works if the ivy is somewhat under control already. Ivy here is shallow rooted but spreads via runners.
Bill
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news.net:

on a small scale, i agree. i use vinegar to good effect on any small plants that pop up here at the home farm. poison ivy berries are excellent winter bird food, so i leave the PI over on the other side of the pond alone for the birds. my problem PI is at a place i bought in NY, where i have ivy vines up to 4" across running up trees. just cutting the vine kills the top, obviously, but then there's a dead urshurol loaded vine up the tree & huge amounts of shrubby growth coming from the huge root system that supported that vine. i'm violently allergic. the ivy needs to go. how did people cope before glyphospate? hmm. perhaps by dying from their allergies? poison ivy grows in woodland borders. i *could* cut down all the trees & shrubs in the yard & thereby make it inhospitable for poison ivy, i suppose, but then *i* wouldn't want to live there either... lee
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Copper nails ?
Bill
<http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&client=safari&rls=en-us&q=poison+ivy + copper&as_q=nail&btnG=Searchwithinresults>
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news.net:

there's a thought... how would that affect the stream next to the ivy? it's not really deep enough for fish, but it feeds a larger creek... and does copper affect frogs? they're very sensitive to chemicals (another reason to avoid them, although i'm sure the apple orchard across the street uses more chemicals in a season than i *ever* will...) still copper nails sounds like a great experiment at least. lee
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You might be able to recover your copper nails after the ivy is dead.
Here is MSDS for Copper.
<http://www.sciencelab.com/xMSDS-Copper-9923549
Bill
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On Thu, 5 Jun 2008 12:58:17 +0000 (UTC),when reading "rec.gardens", I'm

Yes sell your house and live somewhere else. ;-)
Honestly, I'm not acquainted with poison ivy but sometimes something like Roundup is necessary to get rid of a pest in the garden.
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Erik.

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Somewhere between assertiveness and laziness, concern and apathy, regard nurturing and pillaging there must be a better answer.
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If you must use an herbicide for poison ivy, use Bonide Brush Killer Bk-32 Conc. (2,4-D) or Brush Killer Bk-32 RTU (Triclopyr). You'll have to make your own assessment of which poison to choose. Our Parks Dept. recommended Triclopyr. And yes, I sold part of my soul, as their alternative was Roundup. Effective in one spraying, it did not kill the grass or even other woody vines in the vicinity. Claims it does not uptake in tree roots, non-toxic after drying, and rainproof in hours. It did kill the roots. It was a huge infestation with arm-sized vines.
http://www.bonideproducts.com/products/category.php?category_id=2
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but how/why would this be better/different than cutting the vines & painting both sides of the cut with glyphospate? i certainly wouldn't be *spraying* anything. that's horribly inefficient. isn't using the 2,4-D just selling out to Dow rather than Monsanto? lee
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Almost all descriptions/recommendations for glyphospate suggest repeat applications. Two years after one application of Bk-32 Conc.(2,4-D), we're only now seeing some small re-emergence. Although as I recall, absorption through the leaves seemed most effective, with painting on the larger cut vines required a second painting.

That was part of the soul-selling I mentioned. At $12 a bottle through Bonide, Dow isn't getting much. I did spend four days removing everything I could. My gloves were so soaked in oil that I threw them away and went barehanded. The forest of "babies" got sprayed, as that was the most efficient for us. Nothing else died. One can't say the same for Roundup.
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<Persephone> wrote in message

My dog patrols the property regularly. She likes to chase squirrels through a line of pine trees that border the yard, and poison ivy was all throughout that stand of trees. I was very proud of myself for donning my "HazMat suit" and pulling out 20-foot vines, peeling the ivy off of each tree, and carefully taking up each 3-leaved plant that I could find. In the end, I had only three little blotches of allergic reaction on both arms, even though I was wearing long gloves and a jacket - I guess I didn't shower quickly enough.
Then I noticed the back fence. 125 feet of chain link fence that separates us from the local reservoir, with poison ivy growing generously along most of its length. It seemed to have come up quickly - I'm sure I would have noticed before it got that bad. But it was daunting. Large growths of the ivy, and I don't have access to the other side of the fence, so I thought I'd try Roundup.
Being an ignorant stool, I read the instructions, then walked slowly along the fence, spraying the foliage as I went. I was supposed to see withering within 24 hours and dead plants within days. But perhaps the deluge of rain a few hours after the spraying had negated the Roundup, because I saw no significant changes four days later. So I sprayed again.
Now, more than a week after the second dose, it looks like I've salted the earth. To be sure, there is nothing back there that looks like poison ivy today, but I've also sacrificed everything within a foot of the fence on both sides.
I walk the grounds regularly, making note of every growth of ivy I find. I don't mind the monthly poison-ivy-pulling weekends (my family is VERY allergic). I won't (can't) have it on the property. But I'm sitting here wondering whether the overkill was worth it. Looking at the dead and withered vines, I have to say, "Yes." But pictures say thousands of words:
http://www.tfrog.com/digitals/daily/daily.htm
Also, while I was back there taking these photos, I see a very healthy growth of what looks to be Japanese honeysuckle and a couple of weeds that look very much like Tree of Heaven. Joy.
dwight
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