root stimulator

I am planting some herbs indoors. I know that it is way early, but I am experimenting with about 24 Jiffy-Pellets and a few herbs like basil, cilantro, and marojorm. (I am getting excited for spring) Is it a good idea to use root stimulator? I used it to expand the pellets. The basil and marojarm sprouted within 3 days. It has been 6 days but have not seen any cilantro sprouts. Should I cantinue to water with a solution of root stimulator?
Also, for grow lights. Can I use normal flourescent tubes or should I buy special plant light tubes?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 16 Feb 2006 12:53:48 -0800, higgledy wrote:

Good day higgledy. I doubt that root stimulator will have much effect on the sprouting times of your seeds. Look on the cilantro seed package to see how long the seed takes to sprout. 6 days may not be long enough.
It's o.k. to start your herbs this early indoors. You will want to keep a watchful eye on them and "pot them up" to larger pots soon. Put them in 4 inch pots, peat plug and all, and cover them with potting soil. Just cover the peat plug, don't plant them deeper than the plug. This can cause trouble. After a few weeks in a 4 inch pot, they may need to be potted up again to a 1 gallon pot. The goal is to not to have the roots constricted. As the herbs grow, pinching the tops may help with their hight and branching.
For grow lights you can use flourescent tubes with no problems. Make sure you keep the lights as close to the plants as possible. Other wise the plants will get "leggy" as they strech for the light. You can use plant lights if you wish, or you can cheat and go the cheaper route. Buy one plain old shop light and a "kitchen and bath" light. Place one of each in your light fixture. The shop light will give you the blue light your plants need, while the kitchen and bath light will give you the red light your plants need. Together they make pretty good full spectrum lighting.
Good luck and good day.......
--
http://resources.ywgc.com











Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I bought the shop light. I got one soft white tube and one tube that I cannot remember right now but it has a redish glow compared to the soft white tube. I also have an incandescent plant bulb, should I turn this on too?
I have these plants in my finished basement, about 68 degrees F, all the time. Is this warm enough?
As far as root stimulator, a local nursery owner told me that is how they get there tomatoe plants to have such terrific roots, they are bounded in the cups. But a soild root is ideal for tomatoes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

different kinds should work well. Incandescent bulbs do not produce enough light and get too hot. Reflectors on the fluorescent holders increase the foot candle power. Mirrors or aluminum foil sheets work well too. Having the lamps on chains will help adjust the lamps as the plants grow.

Sixty five degrees is about ideal for most plants. Eighty degrees for sprouting seeds.
A timer is almost a necessity. Some plants grow much better than others under artificial lighting. African violets respond exceptionally well to fluorescent lighting.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
When I grew cilantro it took 10 days to get the first sprout and 14 days to get 2/3 germination. My temperature was about 72F, so at 68F your seeds will take longer.
Andrew

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A heating pad would be a good idea. Just make sure to check the watering as the soil will dry faster. A heating pad for germinating seeds will keep the soil several degrees above ambient temps and help keep the roots warm and help them grow.
Layne
On Fri, 17 Feb 2006 21:21:46 -0600, "Andrew Ostrander"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 18 Feb 2006 16:01:10 +0000, Layne wrote:

I'm too poor (really I'm too cheap!) for a heating pad. Seeing as seeds need more heat than light, I put a florescent light on the table, floor facing up. I place my seed trays on top of the light fixture.The mild heat from the light is good enough to warm the soil, but not hot enough to hurt anything. Ofcourse you must not water the flats while _on_ the light or you'll get a good zap... but this does work.
--
http://resources.ywgc.com/photo /

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.